Soul Food Fest unites students and Redlands community with Black culture

By MEANNA SMITH

Stronger Together Now, a community outreach organization, hosted their second Soul Food Fest on Sept. 11 at Ed Hales Park in Downtown Redlands. This event was sponsored by Chase Bank.

Stronger Together Now, the organizers of the event, set up a booth with an inspiring promotional banner advocating against racism and other prejudices. At this booth, t-shirts and tote bags could be purchased and a donation jar was available for people who would like to see more events like this in the Redlands  community.  (Ethic News photo)

This festival gives many Black owned businesses and organizations a chance to showcase their products or services. This festival was also a great way for the Black community to be recognized in the city of Redlands. The Soul Food Fest gave the local high school club Black Student Union a chance to connect with each other while also connecting with the community and its citizens.

Showcasing a game booth table with cup stacking and cards, various Redlands Unified School District Black Student Union members work together at the Soul Food Festival on Sept. 11. Students from Redlands, Redlands East Valley, Citrus Valley and Orangewood High Schools were present at the event.  (Photo courtesy of Quinkitha O’Neal)

Some of the businesses that were present during the festival were House of Purvian Cookie, Brooklyn’s Bakery Bites, Delviccio’s BBQ SmokeHouse, Asdelina’s Agua Frescas, and most popularly known, The WingMan. Citrus Valley, Redlands, Redlands East Valley and Orangewood High Schools all had BSU clubs present at the festival. 

The House of Peruvian Cookie at the Soul Food Festival was a popular choice among the many food booths, selling many desserts and cookies. The House of Peruvian Cookie is mainly located in Santa Clarita and is a cookie selling business based on Peruvian desserts. (Kevin Kambey/Ethic News photo)

Andrew Simmons, senior from Orangewood High School’s BSU, said, “ I really enjoyed seeing other schools’ Black Student Unions and helping all the different booths set up.”  

Jazz Daughtrey, a junior at Citrus Valley High School, attended the festival with the Citrus Valley’s BSU and said she loved “the soul food fest and seeing the Black culture.” 

“The food was amazing and I love how welcoming the other Redlands BSU clubs were,” said Daughtrey.

Another member of Citrus Valley’s BSU, sophomore Kalaya Felton, stated, “The shirts that people were selling were so beautiful and everything was so well put together. The soul food festival was just overall awesome.”

Various activities were available to participate in during the festival. These activities included spades and dominos contests, music, and food competitions. The food competition consists of three different categories: best main dish, best side dish, and best dessert. 

The award for best main dish was given to The WingMan with his lemon pepper wings, the winner for best side dish was Papa’s BBQ for their mac n cheese, and lastly the winner for best dessert was Still Standn Barbq with their famous banana pudding. 

The winners of the competition were awarded a certificate of appreciation as well as an additional prize. Spades and dominos winners were awarded a customized domino or card set. 

While the judges were tasting food from all the different food competition competitors, Kologbo Daughtrey gave a live performance on his soprano saxophone. He played a variety of songs including “Lovely Day” by Bill Withers. 

The Soul Food Festival had a mission of bringing the Black community and all people in Redlands together to bond and unite as one. 

Redlands citizen Kaylee Doll, junior at Citrus Valley, stated, “I think the Soul Food Festival was really a pure, safe, and fun environment and it was a great way to spend my Sunday afternoon.” 

News brief: Redlands East Valley High School’s Mental Health Awareness Club holds a suicide prevention event

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

The Redlands East Valley High School Mental Health Awareness Club held a suicide prevention event during lunch on Thursday Sept. 8, 2022.

The booth was held in observance of National Suicide Prevention Week which is from Sept. 4 to Sept. 10. 

“I think that it’s good that more people are talking about mental health and the stigma around it,” said sophomore Eliana Campa, “So, the booth was really cool because people were able to talk about what mental health is and why it’s important.”

At the booth, there were pins with green ribbons for mental health awareness, candy for students, and a positive affirmation station. There students were able to write positive anecdotes on notes or on a poster that will be hung up at REV. Finally, an interactive mental health check was available where students could have placed a paint dot for how they were doing in a certain section. 

“I was in charge of the positive affirmation notes,” said Mental Health Awareness Club Vice President and senior Amélie Palacios, “and I saw that many students were more than happy to leave a kind note for a student that would need it in the future.”

“[Mental Health Awareness Club’s] goal is to provide a safe space to learn, talk and listen to each other,” said Mental Health Awareness Club President and senior Sarinna Schwendiman. 

Mental Health Awareness Club’s next event is their annual Mental Health Fair where multiple clubs from REV and organizations from the county hold educational booths with games, giveaways or resources. 

On Sept. 8, 2022 during lunch time, Wildcats came by the Mental Health Awareness Club’s booth dedicated to suicide prevention. There were many activities at the booth including an interactive mental health check and a positive affirmation station. Among the Wildcats, sophomore Eliana Campa picks up a pin and reads the table cover which shows that National Suicide Prevention Week and a crisis hotline: 988. (Credit / Amélie Palacios)

Q&A: New Wildcat theatre teacher talks perfectionism, plays and ‘Pride and Prejudice’

By KENDRA BURDICK

Starting in the 2022-23 school year, Ashley Visco is teaching at Redlands East Valley High School for her first year. She will be teaching Theatre Arts I and II. (Photo courtesy of  Ashley Visco)

Ashley Visco is a new teacher to Redlands East Valley High School staff. Visco teaches Theater Arts I and Theater Arts II and tries to make a colorful and inspiring learning environment for her students. Visco answers some questions about herself and her career below. 

Why did you choose this course to teach?

I loved theater forever. For as long as I can remember I was raised on it, a bit because when my dad was in high school he was heavily involved in theater. My sisters all loved musicals and things like that so I kinda grew up with a lot of plays and musical performances. Stories in general, I loved. I volunteered at my former high school Pomona Catholic High School, I volunteered for their theater program, helping out with their productions. I was working with the kids and I was like, I could teach this, it’d be fun and I’d enjoy doing it. But I didn’t know if I’d have the opportunity to teach a drama class, I’d always thought I’d go for English, so when this came up “Hey do you want to be our drama teacher?” I said “Yeah! I do.” I love this and it’s been really fun.

Did you teach at any other schools before REV?

This is my first teaching position and I did student teach at Upland High School and that is about it. Only Redlands so far.

 Why did you choose to teach at REV?

For sure I am really happy with REV and Redlands in general, Redlands Unified. I’ve had the opportunity to teach before this. I finished my program two years ago to work at charter schools and different things but I felt “It just doesn’t feel like a good fit.” Other schools just didn’t feel organized and it didn’t seem like they were prioritizing the kids. I almost worked at an arts high school which had a lot of theater kids coming in, but it still wasn’t the right fit for me. I got hired to do summer school for Redlands and I just really liked the district. Everyone was so nice and professional. Then this school interviewed me and was very nice and I hoped that I got the job. Everyone I’ve met has been so nice and lovely and the campus is big and beautiful and has this big, beautiful theater. My high school’s theater was like one-twentieth [the size of] of REV’s. 

 Why did you choose to become a teacher?

I talked to my English teacher saying “Hey, I want to be a writer.” Things changed with college. I was majoring in English and it didn’t feel purposeful enough, it didn’t feel like I was doing anything. It was like “what’s the point, what am I here for.” When I volunteered with those kids I thought it felt important. So I tried teaching because I liked working with young people and doing something that could matter. 

What would you be if you could have been anything other than a teacher?

I wanted to be a writer for a long time. I was very book obsessed and still am but my brain gets tired so unfortunately I haven’t sat down and read a good book in a while. I thought I’d be a writer because I love historical romance, Pride and Prejudice, and things like that. I wrote Pride and Prejudice fan-fiction back in the day. 

What’s important to you?

Respect is huge for me. Confidence is also very important because I like working with younger people and helping them find who they want to be. Especially because we all can remember what it’s like being at this time in your life (high school) its really difficult and you need those people who support you and build you up and being that person to students is important to me. Respect and love are all around for everybody. That’s something that I love about this theater department. “I can do anything and I’ve got people from different parts of theater that can come in here and try something new.” It’s an exciting position and I’d say that the most important thing is respect and love for everybody.

What’s something that you would like to tell students?

Focus on yourself. I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately cause it’s easy to get stuck in the day and your schedule and you try to get through it with your friends but it can get frustrating and it’s good to remember to focus on yourself and your needs. Especially with school, get done what you need to get done and you might not know where you’re going necessarily but that’s okay as long as in the moment, they are happy, healthy, and surrounded by people that are good for you.

What college did you go to?

I started at the University of La Verne right after I graduated from high school but my mental health started to slip a little bit to where I was struggling and I just wasn’t happy and finally I was struggling too. So I decided “Let’s take a break.” I worked and matured and tried to figure out what I wanted to do, that’s when I volunteered. I was like “Teaching sounds good. I worked with kids at the theater program and loved it.” So I went online and went to Grand Canyon University which is a cool program and I highly recommend that people decide if they want to go to college in person or not in person. I was struggling with the anxiety of being in college and being with all of those people and I realized that online works better for me. I got a Bachelor of Arts in English for secondary education, specifically for teaching English. 

What’s the biggest thing that you welcome into your classroom?

The bravery to try new things is huge and even if it’s the smallest thing. You don’t have to be “look at me” but if normally you’re kinda shy and you step out of your shell and do some of the exercises and games we play. The courage to do something silly is really important. Another thing I’ve been thinking about is that there’s so much shyness I think and the awkwardness of standing out in high school which I understand. Something that I value and appreciate is seeing someone willing to just do something as opposed to having the fear of standing out.

Who got you to where you are now?

My parents in the sense that they helped me get through a lot of school just by being very accepting and supportive. There was never too much pressure or too little pressure. They were like “Hey, we know you’re smart and do your best.” I didn’t struggle with school because of that so I appreciate that they were like that. I had an English teacher who was also the drama director at my high school. She was wild and wacky and we had a lot in common. We’d talk about Pride and Prejudice. We’d go out to Cal Poly Pomona and do Shakespearean competitions, we’d perform in front of people for prizes and stuff. My fiance has been super supportive, he’s somebody who helps you be yourself, to find out who you are and what you need. Finally, me. I helped myself get here and I don’t think I give myself credit enough which is something that I’m trying to work on cause I’ve worked hard and it’s difficult to look at yourself and say “You’re doing great right now.” I constantly think about what I did wrong and what I could do better. But it’s like “No. I’m doing great and I worked hard.” 

What is something that you’ve had to change about yourself to fit the job?

Perfectionism is deadly and I lived with it throughout my life. I didn’t realize it until I got older. There’s a part of you as a teacher, I found, that feels responsible for everything. I think that’s why some students see teachers as controlling because there’s a part of you (as a teacher) that makes you feel like it’s all your fault. If it’s not going well, you have to fix it. If a lesson didn’t go well it’s like “Oh my god, I’m the worst.” With cheating, I try to figure out what I did wrong and try to give the students a second chance. I’ve learned I need to just step back and realize that people make their choices. Everybody does what they do, naturally, you can’t step in and try to change it cause you’d be controlling them saying “Hey this, hey this.” Sometimes you’ve got to step back and let them make their choice and if their choice is to not do well in the class then it’s not my fault. If I did everything that I could do, it’s not my fault.

What is the main goal you want to see your students achieve?

Confidence is an important goal I want to see my students achieve. I want them to have enough confidence in themselves to be like “Hey, I can do this and it’s going to be okay.” My ultimate goal is to have them try acting, try to get up on the stage and use their voices. Acting did that for me, it built my confidence like now I can give back the wrong order and talk to people on the phone. Exploring is also a big thing. That’s why I picked the fall play that I did, cause I want them to explore different things from every culture and variety.

Baby food trend emerges at Redlands East Valley High School

By MIYAH SANBORN and KENDRA BURDICK

There has been an emerging trend of students bringing various types of baby foods to snack on throughout the day at Redlands East Valley High School. Although this may seem like a strange choice of food to bring to school, there are some components that compel students to eat it other than just taste. 

People of all ages have been eating baby food as a snack and with the goal of getting the nutrition that they need from a smaller portion. (KENDRA BURDICK/Ethic News photo)

Most high school students are eating baby food for the perceived benefit of losing weight, due to its nutrients and small portions. 

According to the health site Verywell Fit, Shereen Lehman, a healthcare journalist and fact checker, said, “Some proponents of the baby food diet claim that baby foods are healthier because they don’t usually contain any food additives.” 

The health site Healthline Writer Aimee Eyvazzadeh further explains how the diet is used for the reason that “the small portion sizes of baby food will reduce your daily calorie intake. There are several less restrictive versions of the diet, like replacing only one meal a day with baby food.”

With restrictive diets like the baby food diet, it’s also important to keep in mind the risk of developing disordered eating, which could lead to an eating disorder if the diet is followed for a longer period of time, according to Healthline.

“All the baby food that you can buy in the US meets strict US FDA regulations for safety,” said the health site Baptist Health.

Regardless of whether they bring baby food for dietary purposes or purely based on the taste,  some students enjoy this unusual snack to munch on throughout the school day.

Q&A: Wildcat teacher Alexandria Driscoll talks new beginnings

By KENDRA BURDICK

Alexandria Driscoll is a new teacher to Redlands East Valley High School staff. Driscoll teaches Special Education English and tries to make a colourful and inspiring learning environment for her students. Driscoll answers some questions about herself and her career below. 

Why did you choose this course to teach?

I teach special ed and this was the opening that was here. My background is a little more in science but I thought that it’d be fun and I liked English a lot when I took it as a student.

Did you teach at any other schools before REV?

I taught at a school called Shandin Hills in San Bernardino. It’s a middle school and I taught science there.

 Why did you choose to teach at REV

I really wanted to be closer to home and closer to my daughter. I figured it was a good transition because I only live five minutes from here. I went to school in Redlands and I liked it a lot, so I thought it would be a good place to work.

 Why did you choose to become a teacher?

So, originally I studied child development and I liked it a lot. I liked learning how children grow and develop and it kind of got me into the whole ‘how children learn’ and so I was really interested in that. When I graduated from grad school, my friend and I were like “what should we do next” we didn’t really know. So, I kind of dragged her along with me to a credential program with me at the University of Redlands. We really liked it and honestly I’d say that my friend and I influenced each other and with the background in child development it was really easy to transition. 

If you could have been anything other than a teacher, what would you be?

Growing up, I really wanted to be a veterinarian at the zoo. But, that takes a lot of school. Science was not my strong suit growing up and definitely not going to the medical field. But if I could go back in time, I would just be taking care of a baby koala, just feeding it with a bottle.

What’s something that’s important to you?

I would say teaching in a way that’s inclusive for my students and making sure that they’re comfortable here and they feel like they’re represented. That’s my main goal here, even before I start teaching I make sure that this is a comfortable environment for them and that they feel when they’re here they won’t be judged. That they’re comfortable to discuss things here. That’s my main goal—to have inclusion in my classroom.

What’s something that you would like to tell students?

One, mainly for my students, is to not to give up because that’s life and it’s going to be really hard. If you give up the second there’s a struggle, you’re not going to, I think, make it in this world. I’d say, if you’re struggling and it’s hard just kind of push through the best that you can.

What school did you go to?

I started at RCC in Riverside and I got a couple of associates there then I transferred to Cal State. I got a bachelor’s and I stayed there for grad school and then I got a master’s in child development. Then, I went to the U of R and I got my credential there. 

What’s the biggest thing that you welcome into your classroom?

Difference of opinions. I tell my students if you don’t agree with what I’m saying, let’s discuss it. I really welcome an open discussion and that healthy disagreement as far as if you disagree then let’s talk about it.

Who got you to where you are now?

Mainly me because it was a lot of work. My family, they’re very supportive. Both of my parents didn’t really go to college so they didn’t really know how to help me. They were always like “She’s gonna do what she’s gonna do so we’ll just support her.” I’d say that my dad is a really big supporter of me, even if he doesn’t understand fully he’ll always agree with what path I choose.

Miss Driscoll has taught at Redlands East Valley High School for a year. (KENDRA BURDICK/Ethic News Photo)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Berkeley bound Wildcat chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Arnie Corpus. Corpus responds to questions about his future at University of California, Berkley and on the badminton team winning first place in the Citrus Belt League this year. As always, Corpus answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Redlands Educational Partnership hosts basketball fundraiser with Harlem Wizards in Wildcat Gym

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

“A high-flying, slam dunking, rim-rattling basketball show is coming to town!” said the email sent to Redlands East Valley High School students the day before the Harlem Wizards basketball game.

In an effort to raise funds for the Redlands Education Partnership, REP hosted the Harlem Wizards for a fun and friendly game of basketball versus Redlands Unified School District staff on Friday, April 22 at the Wildcat Gym.

Both sides of the gym were packed with students, family, and staff members from the various Redlands schools including Franklin Elementary School, Crafton Elementary School, Kimberly Elementary School, Redlands High School and REV.

“It was fun for the kids,” said REV senior Arnie James Corpus. “[The Wizards] got the crowd going and I think people who came got a good show.”

Hailing from Fairfield, New Jersey, the Harlem Wizards, not to be confused with the Harlem Globetrotters despite both teams’ similar comical antics, was originally found by Howie Davis who had “a passion for the merger of sports and entertainment,” according to the Harlem Wizards website, and have five different team units: Broadway  Unit, Showtime Unit, Swoop Unit, Rocket Unit, and Assembly and Special Events Unit.

For the REP game, the crowd saw the Broadway Unit of the Harlem Wizards which included Eric “Broadway” Jones, Arnold “A-Train” Bernard, Devon “Livewire” Curry, Lloyd “Loonatik” Clinton and Leon “Space Jam” Sewell.

The players who played on behalf of the REP Rebounders were Redlands teachers, classified employees and administrators. The team captain was RUSD Superintendent Mauricio Arellano. Bill Berich, REV history teacher and recently retired head basketball coach, was the coach for the REP Rebounders.

“My favorite moments of the game were watching the staff and the Wizards play, but also, honestly and most important, was just seeing those faces in the crowd having a good time,” said Sabrina Thunderface Mercado, AP Secretary from Cope Middle School, who was the shortest player on the team at 4 feet and 11 inches. 

Mercado says she volunteered to play because she “thought it would be fun for my 19-year-old son to see his Mom out on the court playing ball with The Harlem Wizards. He loves basketball.” 

(MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News visual)

The referees of the game included Redlands East Valley High School’s new athletic director, Chad Blatchley. Brandon Ford, sociology and career foundations teacher and softball coach, Ted Ducey, badminton coach and earth science teacher and Ryan Parson, teacher, also represented REV. RHS Advanced Placement Teacher and Volleyball Coach Nathan Smith joined the high school teacher players.

“The game itself was a lot of fun and I hope it raised a lot of money,” said Smith, “I would play it again.”

Middle school staff players were Mercado, TeAnna Bermudez and Kiele Pratt from Cope and Matthew Villalva from Moore.

“Joining in on the fun, especially after the last few years we’ve had, where people couldn’t hang out with each other, students weren’t in school like normal. It was great to have some normalcy return to us all,” said Mercado.

Elementary schools staff players included Jennie Dyerly from Crafton, Jeff Stamners from Cram, and Natalie Wood from Judson and Brown, Carolyn Bradshaw from Kimberly, Scott Ferguson from Lugonia, John Smith from from McKinley, Damion Sinor from Mentone and Jeff Doolittle from Mission. Franklin Elementary had Rebecca Acosta, Erick Nowak, Katy Swift, Leah Timpe and Alexis Padilla participating in the game.

Numerous sponsors supported the game including Pacific Dermatology Institute, Redlands Police Officers Association, Redlands Community Hospital, Maupin Physical Advisors, Welsh Insurance Services, Neal and Joyce Waner, Holiday Inn Express, Trader Joe’s and Chick-fil-A.

As soon as one team got the lead, the other managed to tie the game again, but despite this pattern throughout the majority of the game, the Harlem Wizards left the Wildcat gym triumphant.
The Redlands Educational Partnership website  has more information on their programs and donations.

Before the game started, Jamel “The Voice” Thompson, brought by the Harlem Wizards, played music to hype up players and audience members. Thompson and Redlands East Valley High School announcer Kirk Escher watch the Harlem Wizards warmup. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Teachers from some of Redlands’ elementary schools took part in the game, and mascots from Cope middle school and Clement middle school stood in front of the crowd while watching the court. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

The REP team is seen standing in a line while high-fiving their coach Bill Berich as he runs past them with his name being announced. Berich is retiring this year from being Redlands East Valley High School’s boys’ varsity basketball coach. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Both the REP Rebounders and the Harlem Wizards leave the Redlands East Valley High School basketball court while waving to the fans. The game ended with the Harlem Wizards magically winning. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Chad Blatchley, one of the referees of the game and Redlands East Valley High School’s athletic director, watches the game as the bleachers are packed with families, students, and staff. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

With the Harlem Wizards already having a lead of eight points, their player Devon “Livewire” Curry attempted a backwards half court shot, and when the ball fell in the hoop, the players and crowd alike erupted into cheers. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Both the REP Rebounders and the Harlem Wizards leave the Redlands East Valley High School basketball court while waving to the fans. The game ended with the Harlem Wizards magically winning. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Guadalajara native Dona Ayala chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Translated by DANIELA MORA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School Guadalajara native Dona Ayala. Ayala responds to questions in Spanish about her life inside and outside of school as well as maintaining her culture in America.  As always, Ayala answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Redlands East Valley High School boys basketball coach Bill Berich retires

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS and MAURICIO PLIEGO

Bill Berich has been involved in education for 41 years and has been a teacher and coach at Redlands East Valley since its opening in 1997.

Berich says, “I wanted to get back into coaching high school basketball – and REV was opening up so I applied.”

In an away game against the Redlands High School boys varsity basketball team, Redlands East Valley High School boys’ varsity basketball coach Bill Berich dismisses his team from a timeout. The end of the game resulted in a win for the Wildcats. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

He taught at Yucaipa Junior High for two years, 13 years in Yucaipa High School, and 25 years at REV. Berich has taught social studies, physical education, health, English and science classes over the course of his career along with coaching basketball and several other sports. 

Berich says, “I have so much fun teaching. I am not the best teacher, but I doubt anyone enjoys it as much as I do. I like helping kids [who want to be helped] and seeing them succeed.”

 “I have so much fun teaching. I am not the best teacher, but I doubt anyone enjoys it as much as I do.”

Bill Berich, Redlands East Valley High School Head Boys Basketball Coach

Head coach Bill Berich (far right) watches his team rejoicing as Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick and junior Jeremiah Bolaños jump with enthusiasm after winning their final CBL game of the 2021-22 basketball season in an overtime clinch. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Berich has coached basketball for 43 years and that has included six years in freshman basketball, seven seasons as the head boys’ varsity coach from 1986-1993, four seasons as assistant coach at the University of Redlands from 1993-1997 and has been head coach at REV since 1997.

Along with basketball, he has coached for softball, golf, track, junior varsity softball and badminton.

During his time as a coach at REV, basketball has won four Kiwanis Tournaments, two Beaumont Tournaments, four Citrus Belt League and several other tournaments. Since REV’s opening in 1997, the team has qualified for the California Interscholastic Federation playoffs for 20 out of the 25 years.

Redlands East Valley High School boys’ varsity basketball coach Bill Berich stands on the sideline during the first and last CIF game for the Wildcats of the 2021-2022 season on Feb. 11, 2022. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As coach, Berich can think of two memories that he can say were his favorites but he cannot choose a favorite season.

He says, “CIF Finals at the Honda Center in 2015. Winning a game in the State Tournament.  Our first CBL Title.  But, maybe above all of that, was the retirement send-off I was given at our last home game on February 4, 2022. That was amazing.”

Over the years, he has grown to love the students, faculty and everyone who works at REV. Berich feels it has “become infectious” and feels blessed to have taught at REV.

Coach Berich speaks to the Redlands Educational Partnership Rebounders team in hopes to lead them through the game against the comedic, traveling basketball team the Harlem Wizards. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As the coach for the REP Rebounders, Bill Berich talks to his team of Redlands’ teachers, classified employees and administrators before they begin their fundraising basketball game against the comedic basketball team the Harlem Wizards on April 22, 2022. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The only thing he would change is to hold the students to a higher standard regarding attendance, academics and behavior because he feels that it would be possible to do.

Berich lives by the Golden Rule, and he believes that students should know that “what is popular is not always right, and what is right is not always popular.”

He says, “I try to treat people the way I would like to be treated. I try to do my best and take satisfaction in that regardless of the results.”

During his free time, he golfs, fishes, and takes care of his disabled son, Billy. For his retirement, he hopes to be able to teach at a junior college, or community college, and continue fishing, golfing, and boating.

Originally an assistant coach to Berich, Head Coach Mike Aranda has coached REV basketball since the 1999-2000 season.

 “He has worked very hard over the years to build up the REV basketball program. We’ve won CBL titles, preseason tournaments, a state playoff game, and reached the CIF Final in 2015,”  says Aranda. “He cares deeply about his players but not just in regard to their basketball abilities, he wants his players to be successful in all aspects of life. He’s taught his players about responsibility, work ethic, and accountability to prepare them for their lives after their basketball career is over.”

Aranda says, “I am very thankful to Coach Berich for his help and guidance in my coaching and teaching career.”

News brief: Redlands East Valley’s class of 2022 celebrates senior commit day

By ELLA FITZPATRICK

The Redlands East Valley senior class of 2022 gathered at lunch on April 29 to celebrate senior commit day—an event to recognize the future graduates education plans after high school.

Between the M and K buildings at REV, the Associated Student Body set up a small gathering of free pizza, soda and chips for the seniors attending college in the fall.

Because the grass yard between both buildings was closed off for only seniors, the students were able to enjoy the lunch with themselves and connect with each other about their plans for college.

“It was nice being able to see where other people are committed to. It makes it feel as if we’re going our separate ways but we’ll always have a shared high school experience,” says Alicia Gullon, a senior at REV with plans to attend University of California, Berkeley.

“It makes it feel as if we’re going our separate ways but we’ll always have a shared high school experience.”

Redlands East Valley High School senior Alicia Gullon

Along with eating food, the students could also take photos together in front of the photo booth with friends and sign a banner with their name and the college they plan on attending.

Between the M and K buildings at Redlands East Valley High School, Wildcat seniors Prescott Neiswender and Katelyn Kennedy pose in front of a decorated photo booth to take a photo for Senior Commit Day on April 29 during lunch. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley seniors Giselle Sefiane Coady, Ella Martinez-Spencer, Luca Smith and Corey Ford sign a banner with their names and the colleges they plan on attending in the fall on Senior Commit Day at REV on April 29. ( ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

News brief: Students invited to participate in Redlands Day of Community Service

By JASMINE ROSALES and SPENCER MOORE

All students in Redlands are invited to participate in the Redlands Day of Community Service on Saturday, May 7 from 8:30 am to noon.  

Steven Mapes, community member, invites everyone of all ages to come out and take part in the Redlands Day of community service. Mapes encourages students to wear their respective school colors to uplift others by seeing the youth serving in our community.

Digital image representing a day of community service created using Adobe Spark (MAURICIO PLIEGO/ Ethic image)

“One of the best things about the Community Day of Service is the way that it brings so many different people together,” said Judy Cannon, Director of Communications for the Redlands Stake of Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints. “We have all age groups and affiliations working alongside each other. It’s part of what makes Redlands so great.”

Students can obtain volunteer hours and take pride in their community by partaking in Redlands Day of Community Service.

“Some of our favorite volunteers are the students from our local high schools. They bring their youthful energy and a unique spirit of fun to the day,” said Cannon.

To volunteer visit Just Serve and search for “Redlands Day of Service May 7th, 2022.”  From there, choose a project to participate in.

The projects to choose from are: Heritage Park-Grounds Landscaping, State Street Planters, Redlands Sports Park Fence-Painting,  Ford Park Pond Stabilization and Gateway Ranch Cable Fencing.

For more information visit Just Serve: Annual Redlands Community Day of Service

Wildcat artists place at San Bernardino County art show

By CYRUS ENGELSMAN

Several Redlands East Valley High School students received recognition for their art on March 15.

The Young Artists Gallery Reception is an annual event hosted by the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools and Riverside Inyo Mono San Bernardino

California Arts Project in association with The Arts Education Network.  

A total of 27 schools entered the competition and 177 pieces of art were judged for the event.  The categories of the show were drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, digital art, comic art, ceramics, mixed media and film/animation.  

Out of the 177 pieces of art juried at the show, there were four winners from REV. 

“Living in life, that’s probably the best inspiration that I get,” says second place winner REV sophomore Mia Altenbac said. “Things that just come naturally I find inspiration from that.” 

The following art pieces are the winners from REV.  The winners were also recognized at REV’s spring rally on April 8.

Redlands East Valley High School student Jay Gutierrez, third place winner, sends in this piece for the art category. (Courtesy of Tracy Massimiano)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Luke Loomis wins second place with a ceramic cup for the competition. (Courtesy of Tracy Massimiano)

Second place winner Mia Altenbach has her digital art piece sent in for the competition. (Courtesy of Tracy Massimiano)

First place winner and Redlands East Valley sophomore, Matthew Thorig, displays their drawing piece.  (Courtesy of Tracy Massimiano)

Wildcat Associated Student Body organizes demonstration to support advisor

By MAURICIO PLIEGO and SPENCER MOORE

On March 17, a protest was organized on Opal and Colton Avenue by #savefash, a movement created by the Redlands East Valley Associated Student Body junior class in hopes of reinstating their advisor, Matt Fashempour, of eight years.

Members of the ASB class felt that there was not an explanation given. 

Robert Clarey, the REV Principal, says, “ This is a personnel decision and, as such, it would be unprofessional of me to discuss openly.”

Shannon Cockerill, current senior and ASB Executive President at REV, says, “I realize protest and petitions don’t guarantee anything, so at the very least, I hope Fashempour gets an explanation and he see’s just how many people support him and appreciates everything he does.”

Clarey says, “I hear the rumors as well, it is unfortunate that a lack of information causes people to make up their own narrative. People feel the need to be in the know…or at least to appear that they are in the know.”

More students joined the crowd throughout the morning prior to the start of school. Participants received shirts printed by a parent of one of the students involved and held student-created posters.

Redlands East Valley High School junior Nathan Derry holds a “Save Fash” poster along the sideline of Colton Avenue before school on March 17. (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomores Lily Shaw and Amanda Morrison carry posters for passing cars to “honk for Fash” along the sideline of Colton Avenue before school on March 17. (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Lights, camera, action: what Wildcat & eAcademy performers have to say about Spring Showcase

By ISAAC MEJIA

The Redlands East Valley High School theater department presented its Spring Showcase on Friday, March 11. While the department traditionally performs a musical in the spring, this year they decided on a showcase in which students were allowed to perform and collaborate on acts of their choosing. 

The show consisted of many scenes from popular movies and tv shows including “Mean Girls” and “Victorious” as well as acts from acclaimed musicals such as “Hamilton” and “In the Heights.” 

“My favorite part has been working with my friends, and seeing how talented everyone is. Getting to act is amazing, but my favorite part [is] having fun with other actors,” said Connor Bromberger, a senior at REV. 

REV senior ​​Leilani Baldwin said, “The people are so supportive and loving. Needless to say, they are some of the most fun people I know.”

Many of these acts required students to work together creatively for weeks. 

Grace Castell, a senior at REV, said her favorite part about the showcase “has to be working with my friends. There’s never a dull moment with them.”

Bella Mia Fraley, a freshman at Redlands E-Academy said, “Being on stage, the lights, the sounds, it’s all so fun, and I hope I can do more productions with this school in the future.”

While preparing for the showcase was full of excitement, performers admit that the process was stressful at times. 

Nina Brown, a freshman at E-academy said, “The preparation process has been really stressful, but also really fun. It’s always fun to go to rehearsal and practice.”

Ella Fletcher, a senior at REV, said the showcase was “definitely a little stressful, but that is always a part of performing onstage because performers care so much that what you see onstage is as perfect as possible.”

(From left down to right down) Evie O’Brien, Lizeth Lopez, Rose Blatchley, Ella Fletcher, Dana Hatar and Megan Rimmer starred in Ex Wives from “Six” the musical. Their performance was the closing act of the night. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Junior Evie O’Brien (left) and senior Connor Bromberger (right) stand next to each other with weaponry during their portrayal of Henry vs his Demons. (ISAAC MEJIA/ Ethic News photo)

The actors and actresses of the showcase had their own unique individual experiences. Behind the scenes, the tech and stage crew had their own experiences as well.

eAcademy freshman Dakarai Marshall said “I have learned a lot more than I expected, such as using power tools. I have had fun learning these life lessons and skill sets that I will benefit from forever.”

Moments before the show, the cast sits around the set patiently waiting to be called by the tech crew for their last mic check. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Liliana Arroyo (left) and Lelanie Baldwin (right), two of the soloists of the night, pose for a picture outside of the theater room.  Arroyo performed “Hopelessly Devoted To You” from Grease while Baldwin performed “Breathe” from In the Heights. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

(ISAAC MEJIA/ Ethic News video)

For some students, the Spring Showcase marked the beginning of their theatrical career at REV. However, for seniors, the showcase was the last time that they would set foot on the Blackstone Theater Stage and perform in front of a live audience.

Fletcher said, “I am happy to be a part of this production, but it is a little bittersweet. I do wish it was a full show though, but I’m happy to be involved!”

“It’s a surreal feeling to know this is the last time I will walk on and off of the Blackstone Theater stage as an attending REV student, ” said Baldwin. “I had grown so much in my craft in this very building.”

 “I do wish we could have done an actual play, but having the freedom to create a scene on our own is still just as great,” Catell said. “As long as I have fun and get to be with my friends, then I don’t mind! I will miss all the people I got to work with once I graduate though.”

Wildcats bring awareness with mental health fair

By ELLA FITZPATRICK, CYRUS ENGELSMAN, DANIELA MORA, MIA ARANDA, MIRIAM YORDANOS, AILEEN JANEE CORPUS and KENDRA BURDICK

To raise more awareness and combat the mental health stigma at Redlands East Valley High School, the Mental Health Awareness club hosted a mental health fair from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on March 8 in the main quad.

Wildcat students explore the Mental Health Fair during third period in the main quad on the East Valley campus to participate in the Mental Health Fair on Tuesday, March 8. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Julie Castillo, teacher of the Mental Health Career Pathway classes at REV who advises the Mental Health Awareness club at REV, says, “People know what they hear in the media. People know what they hear from friends. People know what they hear from family. But people don’t always know what people who work in the field of mental health want them to know.”

“Many people with serious mental illness are challenged doubly. On one hand, they struggle with the symptoms and disabilities that result from the disease,” according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.  “On the other, they are challenged by the stereotypes and prejudice that result from misconceptions about mental illness.” 

Booths led by students from the mental health pathway classes, clubs on campus and organizations partnered with the Mental Health Awareness Club and offered a variety of different resources, education, and activities. 

 “The mental health fair is here to educate people who know nothing about mental health,” says Castillo.

 “We always need to bring this education and awareness to the public. And that has always been our main goal: to eradicate the stigma through the education of mental health, wellness, and illness,” says Castillo.

Mental health resource and education booths

Through Castillo’s efforts, the Mental Health Awareness club and the mental health career pathway classes were able to team up with multiple mental health organizations based outside of REV. 

These outside organizations that made an appearance, and also made up half of the 20 booths at the fair, included The Spring to Autumn Counseling Services, the Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program, the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health, the Behavioral Medical Center of Loma Linda Hospital, Redlands Unified School District employees, the University of Redlands Alliance for Community Transformation and Wellness members, the Inland Empire Therapy Dogs, the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools and Generation Rise. 

Ranger, a dog who works with the Inland Empire Therapy Dogs, poses for a picture looking into the sun. He joined other dogs from the program at the Mental Health Fair at REV to receive pets and belly rubs from the students visiting the fair. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Wildcats students eagerly wait for their turn using the virtual reality headset offered by the Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program on Tuesday, March 8. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

The other ten booths were run by students from the Mental Health Awareness Club and the mental health career pathway classes. The students put together educational booths on various mental health topics and coping skills. 

Above: Joshua Zatarain, a junior at Redlands East Valley High School, plays a game at the Mental Health Awareness Club booth at the Mental Health Fair on March 8. Joshua Masangcay, a senior and the president of the Mental Health Awareness club, shows Zatarain how to play the game. The game involves throwing a ball towards a pyramid of collapsable cans; if the player successfully knocks down a can, they win the game. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School seniors Avery Zercher and Grace Mcastell, students in the mental health careers pathway classes, give a presentation on the realities of substance abuse at a booth for the Mental Health Fair on Tuesday, March 8. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Breanna Routhieux and senior Alison Bradshaw provide information about different types of foods that improve brain health at their nutrition booth at the Mental Health Fair on Tuesday, March 8. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

REV’s clubs, including Rock Painting Club, the Wildcat Pride Association and Art Club, were also encouraged to participate in the fair with their own educational booths about stigmas and how to practice healthy mental wellness.

Rock Painting Club

The Rock Painting Club’s booth provided students with supplies to paint their own rocks that they could keep. 

Redlands East Valley High School freshmen Vibha Athreya (left) and Eliana Campa (right) use the booth’s supplies to paint rocks on Tuesday, March 8 in the Wildcat quad. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

“Rock painting is a way to prevent stress and find a healthy coping mechanism,” said Rock Painting Club President and senior Tejazvi Gopalan. 

Rock Painting Club President and senior Tejazvi Gopalan helps oversee the booth where students had the opportunity to paint their own rocks on Tuesday, March 8 in the Wildcat quad. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Rock Painting Club welcomes any new members every Thursday at lunch in room K110 to paint rocks that can either be kept for personal use or be used to help decorate the campus. 

Art Club

Art Club’s booth allowed students to display their emotions on paper by scribbling on paper then using colors to express the emotions they feel daily.  

Art Club encourages different interpretations of art, therefore they reinforced the idea that not everyone’s color interpretations will not be the same. 

“Most of us, whether we know it or not, have a mental illness of some sort. Eliminating the stigma is really going to be beneficial for the future,” said Art Club Vice President junior Lana Nutter. 

Wildcat Pride Association 

The Wildcat Pride Association had a booth with a game of Myth or Fact where WPA Vice President Finn Stewart would make a statement and it would be up to the player to decide if the statement was a myth or a fact. If the participant got the statement correct, then they would be able to get a raffle ticket and a candy or prize. 

“Our station is about mental health in the LGBTQ+ community and how it’s stigmatized, and we have written down myths and facts about certain parts of it,” said junior and WPA Vice President Finn Stewart. 

Wildcat seniors Rishi Patel, Neo Morrison and Corey Ford talk to Finn Stewart, the vice president of The Wildcat Pride Association, as they fill out an interactive worksheet for their class. The worksheet was provided by Julia Castillo to encourage students to interact with the booths at the fair by answering the questions as they went around visiting booths. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

The WPA had a poster presenting facts about LGBTQIA+ mental health.

Stewart said, “We have a lot of help lines. The fair will be more awareness for students to understand more about people with mental illness and understand that they shouldn’t be hidden away from society and they should be considered people too even though they are struggling with something.” 

Student table on schizophrenia 

The student-run schizophrenia booth offered educational information about what it’s like to have the mental illness. The booth also provided knowledge on the experiences people have when living with it. 

Alicia Gullon and Shannon Cockerill, Wildcat seniors and members of the Mental Health Awareness Club, educate students on the realities of schizophrenia on Tuesday, March 8. Seniors Shireen Takkouch, Luck Mathis and Gavin Oliver watch as senior Isabella-Martinez Spencer plays an interactive game of “this or that” on the computer. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

REV junior Jaylene Lopez said that the booth not only had information to learn about schizophrenia but it also had an interactive game you can play. The game provided a little insight as to how it feels to have schizophrenia and if the player can handle living with it.

Lopez says, “if you really wanna learn, you’re gonna learn more about different types of mental illnesses and different ways to help cope with other mental illnesses.”

The San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health

At the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health booth, they offered pamphlets and flyers  about urgent mental health care, teenage depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, adverse childhood experiences and more.

The pamphlets offered resources and included symptoms of mental health illness that are common within teens.

Volunteer Services Coordinator Susan Abito said, “This event is going to open up a dialogue between the students, where maybe they might not feel comfortable talking. But, now that everyone here and there is a lot of support, they will be more open to discuss mental health.”

Charlotte Baldes, a Wildcat senior, talks with Lana Frausto who works with the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health. Baldes and Frausto discuss mental health resources and potential volunteer program information provided at their booth at the Mental Health Fair at in the Wildcat quad on Tuesday, March 8. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Wildcats visit elementary schools for National Read Across America Day

By ELLA FITZPATRCK and CYRUS ENGELSMAN 

National Read Across America was established in 1998 to encourage children and adults to find enjoyment in reading. March 2 has continued to be National Read Across America day, where groups such as local police, city council officials and high school students go to elementary schools to read to children.

Celebrated on the birthday of Theodore Seuss Geisel, American author of children’s books under the pen name Dr. Seuss, National Read Across America day is distinguished by the tradition of reading his stories such as “Green Eggs and Ham,” “Horton Hears a Who,” and “The Lorax.” 

This year, Redlands East Valley High School students went to Crafton Elementary, Judson and Brown Elementary, Mariposa Elementary and Mentone Elementary.  Each school gave the high school students two hours to read to as many classes as possible.  

Shannon Cockerill, Alicia Gullon, Ella Fitzpatrick and Katelyn Kennedy read the children’s book “The Day the Crayons Quit” by Drew Daywalt to a group of second-grade students on Wednesday, March 2 at Mariposa Elementary School in Redlands, CA for Read Across America. (Credit to Anthony Gomez)

“Interacting with kids brings a whole new wonder of joy,” says Shannon Cockerill, a senior at REV. “When working with them, they have so much energy and joy.”

At Mariposa Elementary School, the 22 participants from REV were given booths–which were set up on the field–to coordinate. At the five booths, classes of about 20 elementary school students would rotate to as many booths as they wanted and each booth offered a different reading and activity. 

Gavin Oliver, Shireen Takkouch, Carston Marich, Isabella Martinez-Spencer and Soraya Gisele Sefiane Coady read a book by Dr. Seuss to a class of elementary school students at Mariposa Elementary School on Wednesday, March 2 in Redlands, CA for Read Across America. (ELLA FITZPATRICK / Ethic News photo)

“It was a lot of fun! I helped read ‘The Day The Crayons Quit’ and helped set up relay activities for the kids,” said Alicia Gullon, a senior at REV.

Seniors Piper Hanson, Ella Fitzpatrick, Lily Cooper, Alicia Gullon, Shannon Cockerill, Emiline Morrison, Tejazvi Gopalan, Katelyn Kennedy, Denver Neff, Isha Saife, Shireen Takkouch, Riley Bouer, Nicholas Sadowski, Gavin Oliver, Carston Marich, Isabella Martinez-Spencer, Soraya Gisele Sefiane Coady, Rishi Patel, Nicholas Perna, Corey Ford, Patrick McIntyre and Sammy Zackowski pose for a photo in front of a mural on Wednesday, March 2 at Mariposa Elementary School located in Redlands, CA. They participate in Read Across America which involves reading books and playing games with the elementary students. (Courtesy of Juliann Ford)

At Judson and Brown Elementary, 13 students were given books to read to children, and hats to wear. Students were told to read their books from one class to another, rotating between classrooms and reading to all grade levels.  

Similar to the group who visited Judson and Brown Elementary, the group of REV students who went to Mentone Elementary school were also instructed to go to every classroom and read a book or two to the students. 

“It was really cool,” says Arnie James Corpus, a senior at REV who visited Mentone Elementary School. “All of the kids wanted to hear the stories and were full of questions. It was very heartwarming to have been able to read to them.”

Editor’s note: The Mariposa Elementary School group photo credit was mistakenly given to Ella Fitzpatrick in the original post. It has since been corrected to Juliann Ford on March 8 at 2:57 p.m.

East Valley students shocked cold by snowfall

By ELLA FITZPATRICK and SPENCER MOORE

Redlands and other cities were greeted with unexpected snowfall across the Inland Empire on Feb. 23, 2022.

According to the Washington Post, a severe drop in temperature was reported to be expected in the Central United States starting the week of Feb. 21, 2022. Cold winds of 20 to 40 degrees were set to blow into the Northern and Midwest areas of the country.

Picture taken at the end of third period at 10:36 a.m. on the top of the stairs connected to the K-wing (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News Photo)

The sudden blast of cold weather was initially thought to only make an appearance in the early hours of the morning, being a time of colder temperature. However, near the end of third period at 10:20 a.m., students and staff at Redlands East Valley High School were surprised by a light snowfall. 

During fourth period, snow began to fall in the quad area of Redlands East Valley High School (SPENCER MOORE/ Ethic News photo)

The dramatic change of weather from cloudy and partly sunny to snowing roused excitement among students and staff at REV. Some students were even let out of their classrooms to enjoy the snow, which is a rare occurrence in Redlands.

“It was super unexpected, and I like that my teacher let us all out of class to go look at it,” says Rose Blatchley, a sophomore at REV. 

The snowfall lasted for almost an hour, continuing until the middle of REV’s lunchtime which starts at 12:39 p.m. and ends at 1:09 p.m..

Sophomore Jolene Kilday explains her joy in seeing the snow this time of year. (SPENCER MOORE/ Ethic News photo)

Photos: Wildcat varsity girls’ basketball loses in second round of CIF playoffs

By MIA ARANDA

Redlands East Valley High School’s varsity girls’ basketball team lost to Louisville High School 43-56 in the second round of CIF Southern Section Division 3A playoffs in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16.

By halftime, REV was losing 18-26 and was able to narrow the gap further by the end of the third quarter with a score of 32-38.

However, Wildcat junior and starter Shaelyn McClain was substituted by senior Carly Copeland following an injury in the fourth quarter. McClain had a total of 13 points for the Wildcats during the game.

Louisville High School, a private, Catholic school in Woodland Hills, has an overall basketball record of 16-5 now. They advanced to the quarterfinals against San Marcos High School at LHS on Feb. 19 and lost 50-49.

This was the first time REV’s girls’ basketball team had qualified for playoffs since 2017. They qualified for Division 1A playoffs, but the team lost to La Cañada High School in the first round.

This year, the Wildcats had a league record of 5-5.

“The team showed huge improvements starting our league season and had to beat a very competitive Cajon squad to qualify this year,” said REV varsity girls’ basketball head coach Robert Tompkins. “That was a big win for us.”

REV senior Ebonny Staten, who had been on the varsity team since her freshman year, and freshman Ci’ella Pickett were attributed by Tompkins as being some of the team’s greatest strengths for having advanced to the second round. In addition, junior Myla Gibson’s improvement at the post also helped the team considerably.

“I am very proud of this team and what they achieved this season. They were able to turn a ‘rebuilding’ year into a successful CIF qualifying run,” said Tompkins.

Tompkins continues, “We set our goals preseason as making the playoffs, we exceed that goal by not only qualifying, but also reaching the second round.”

Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook makes a 2-pointer while being guarded by Redlands East Valley High School junior Shaelyn McClain during the first quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom attempts a 3-pointer during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten drives to the basket and makes a 2-pointer during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Louisville High School freshman Eva Van Lokeren guards Redlands East Valley High School junior Shaelyn McClain during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom attempts a layup while being guarded by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten looks for a teammate to pass to while being guarded by Louisville High School freshman Talya Sepand  during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez and other players watch Lopez’s 2-point shot go in during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16.  (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom looks to pass to teammate Ebonny Staten while being double-teamed by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook and junior Stevie Carmona during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten looks to pass to a teammate while being guarded by Louisville High School sophomore Miye Kodama during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez is eventually blocked by Louisville High School freshman Ava Van Lokeren when she attempts to go up for a 2-pointer during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten is fouled by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook with six seconds left in the third quarter on Feb. 16 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez is double teamed by Louisville High School senior Katherine Csiszar and sophomore Taylor Westbrook during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Following a shot attempt from Louisville High School, LHS freshman Ava Van Lokeren catches the rebound amid pressure from Redlands East Valley High School during the fourth quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Louisville High School sophomore Miye Kodoma attempts a layup during the fourth quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

East Valley’s new Maker Lab encourages creative skills

By CYRUS ENGELSMAN

Sophomore Deacon Carreon stares at a sign made by the librarians that says, “THE LAB”.  Each letter of the sign is meant to represent a different piece of technology available for students to use in the Maker Lab at Redlands East Valley High School. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)  

The Redlands East Valley High School has had a few recent additions on campus, renovating and updating the library, including a new Maker Lab.  

The Maker Lab is a new area filled with technology to help benefit and to inspire creative passion for students.  The Lab is managed by head librarian Korrie Krohne, who was excited to finally be able to show off the Maker Lab.

The Lab is equipped with sewing machines, cricket machines, arts and crafts supplies, fifteen cameras, and 3D printers and scanners.  

The new Maker Lab had been in preparation and construction stages since 2019 and had it soft opening in the Fall of 2021 with a few events.

Krohne said, “I am so thrilled to have the space available to students. When we came back from Winter Break this year, all the scaffolding and other parts of the renovation were out of the way, and we can now use the lab the way it was meant to be used.”

Junior Josh Buridck adds strings to a face mask he recently created in the new Maker Lab at Redlands East Valley High School.  This is one of the final steps of the face mask making process.   (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

To counteract large amounts of students from overcrowding the area, students have to sign up in advance to use the lab.  There are a variety of ways to sign up for the maker lab: the library tab on the schools webpage can bring up a form for personal projects, teachers can sign up the entire class to do a lab, and the librarian-led labs that students can sign up for.  

Librarian-led labs can be a variety of activities. The first of which was face mask making, students from all grades came together to create their own masks to make and keep.  When the second librarian-led lab was announced in December of 2021, students created their own Christmas ornaments.

Senior Amira Carthell sews her face mask together with the help of librarians at Redlands East Valley High School. This is the first step to the face mask making process.   (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Krohne plans to have many more maker lab events in the future.

“I intend to run labs using the different lab equipment both after school and during lunch,” said Krohne. “Additionally, starting in the month of March, I plan on opening the lab one day a week during lunch time to support what people need–if they are working on a project they can come up on that day and use supplies available to them in the lab.”

Korrie Krohne, head librarian at Redlands East Valley High School, demonstrates how to use a sewing machine to the participating students.  The machines were used for students to sew face masks together and take home.  (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat Key Club president chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School Key Club President Audrey Yoh. Yoh responds to questions about how she balances taking all AP classes while also being a varsity athlete and what her future plans are after high school. As always, Yoh answers fast, controverisal “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Photos: Wildcat coach’s last league game ends with overtime win against Thunderbirds

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS 

The Redlands East Valley High School Wildcats had their final game of the Citrus Belt League on Friday, Feb. 4 versus the Yucaipa High School Thunderbirds. This was also the boys varsity basketball annual Senior Night and the final CBL home game coached by the Wildcat’s head coach Bill Berich.

Pre-game

Before the game, announcer Kirk Escher told the audience that “Coach Berich is retiring from teaching and coaching at the end of this year after 42 years in education.”

“It is fitting that we honor him tonight as we host Yucaipa High School, where Bill began his teaching and coaching career in the Inland Empire,” said Escher.

Berich has been REV’s only head boys basketball coach since the school opened in 1997.

The pre-game speeches started with a few words by Berich, saying “This is senior night and maybe one senior citizen night,” with laughs from the crowd.

He then spoke about how thankful he was for being involved in the basketball program at REV and the announcement of the eight REV seniors that were being celebrated on Senior Night.

Before the athletes began their warmup and after the crowd had settled down from the junior varsity game, the final game of the Citrus Belt League started with a few words from Redlands East Valley High School head coach Bill Berich. REV Athletic Director Chad Blatchley and REV ASB Advisor Matt Fashempour also made brief speeches in honor of Berich. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

During Wildcats head boys’ basketball coach’s speech before the game at Redlands East Valley High School on Feb. 4, the boys’ varsity basketball team wait in anticipation for the game to begin. Seniors sat closest to Berich with the younger players sitting near the end of the bench. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Bill Berich hugs his son, Adam Berich, also Wildcat alum, after his family surprised him on the court before the game on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

As a gift to Berich, the Wildcat Associated Student Body presented him with a banner that listed his years and accomplishments as head coach of boys’ basketball at Redlands East Valley High School. He is accompanied by his family and REV seniors are also accompanied by their families on the baseline. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As a surprise, Berich’s daughter and Wildcat alum, Carly Berich-Brunjes, sang the Star Spangled Banner, with the audience, referees, players and coaches standing respectfully. After this, the final Citrus Belt League game for Redlands East Valley High School and Yucaipa High School began. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The Wildcat Gym was decorated with posters of the Redlands East Valley High School seniors for Senior Night on Friday, Feb. 4. Top: Posters of seniors Arnie James Corpus, Piave Fitzpatrick, Luke Mathis and Jaydin Hardy. Bottom: Posters of seniors Jacob Watson, Justin Mills, Aram Bangou and Jacob Zelaya (right).  (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photos)

Game time

The final CBL game of the 2021-23 season started with the Thunderbirds gaining first possession.

The Thunderbirds’ Nathan Hernandez at 6’5 and the Wildcats’ Jacob Zelaya at 6’2 went for the jump ball to begin the game. After the referee had tossed up the ball, Hernandez tipped the ball and gave Yucaipa the first possession of the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Luke Mathis is guarded in the corner by Yucaipa High School senior point guard Joshua Macias in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alfred Lee looks for someone to pass to while being guarded by Yucaipa High School senior Matthew Selbert on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Yucaipa High School senior J.D. Shah, junior Nathan Hernandez and sophomore Tristan Doty and Redlands East Valley High School Piave Fitzpatrick rebound for the ball after a free throw shot in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Jeremiah Bolanos attempts a two-pointer against Yucaipa High School senior Mitchell Hendrickson in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

By the end of the first half, the Thunderbirds had a lead with 36 points and eight fouls with the Wildcats down by eight points with 28 points and 10 fouls. It looked bleak for the Wildcats, but the Litter Box continued to encourage their team.

The varsity cheer squad of Redlands East Valley attended Senior Night and sat by the sideline while still cheering. During halftime, they made three pyramids which resulted in cheers and applause from the crowd. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

The home side stands were packed with athletes’ family and friends, as well as former co-coaches and players of retiring head coach Bill Berich as he coached his last league game. Cheers from the crowd shifted into more quiet tension as the game progressed and neither team was consistently dominating. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Fourth quarter proved to be a challenging for both teams.

At eight minutes in the fourth quarter, Yucaipa was still in the lead with 56 points and REV with 51 points, but because Yucaipa had six fouls and REV had only one, if the Wildcats continued to drive into the Thunderbird’s defense, they could garner enough fouls to get into the bonus and shoot free throws to gain more points to chip away at the deficit.

At five minutes and two seconds left in the fourth quarter, REV and Yucaipa were at a tie of 56 points, but Yucaipa had seven fouls and REV had two fouls. Another tie was hit with three minutes and 59 seconds of the fourth quarter with both teams at 58 points.

The Thunderbirds managed to break away by leading with two points at three minutes and 48 seconds left of the fourth quarter, and Yucaipa gained two more points by two minutes and 57 seconds.

With only two minutes and 7 seconds left of the fourth quarter, Yucaipa was in the lead 64-58 with five fouls for the Wildcats and seven fouls for Yucaipa which made REV in the bonus.

The Thunderbird’s continued this lead even into one minute and seven seconds left of the fourth quarter, but this time, both teams were in the bonus. If either team hoped to win, they would have to minimize their fouls and attempt drawing fouls from the opposing team.

Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick, who plays forward, catches a rebound while on offense on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Luke Mathis prepares to receive a pass from junior Malachi Williams on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Malachi Williams jumps to catch a rebound while on offense on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw attempts a lay up during the second half of the game against Yucaipa on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

At one minute left in the fourth quarter, Yucaipa continued to lead REV by five points with 64 points on the scoreboard.

At 45.4 seconds left of the fourth quarter REV was down by two points with 62 points and Yucaipa still at 64 points. The Wildcats had managed to stop the ball movement for the Thunderbirds and score.

This continued until there was 14.4 seconds left and REV tied the game at 64 points. REV maintained the tie until the end of the fourth quarter, causing the game to go into overtime.

Yucaipa High School sophomore Tristan Doty looks to pass to senior J.D. Shah during the fourth quarter of the game in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Over-time

Thunderbird Nathen Hernandez and Wildcat Ashir Shaw returned to the half court line for the jump ball to begin overtime. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

With extra minutes on the clock for overtime, players, coaches and audience members prepared for the final deciding four minutes of the game.

At two minutes and three seconds, Yucaipa led with 68 points with REV behind by a mere point.

At two minutes REV got the lead with 69 points with Yucaipa still at 68 points. The game continued it’s back and forth pattern by Yucaipa leading with 70 points with REV at 69 points at one minute and 44 seconds left in overtime, but by Yucaipa having 9 fouls and REV with eight. Both teams had the chance of going into the double bonus and for more free throws.

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Darrell Green guards Yucaipa High School senior J.D. Shah during the fourth quarter of the game against YHS on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

With one minute and 17 seconds of the game left on the clock, REV had the lead of 71 points, Yucaipa 70 points, and both teams with the same amount of fouls. 

The Wildcats got the possession at 47.6 seconds left in overtime, gaining more points.

At 18.9 seconds, the Thunderbirds had the possession, but time had run out and the Wildcats’ defense held Yucaipa from scoring.

The Wildcats ended the game victoriously by one point with an end score of 71-70.

Although Yucaipa High School drew a foul from Redlands East Valley High School with 1:02 left on the click, they missed both of their free throws. The Thunderbirds’ Tristan Doty was at the free throw line. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick and junior Jeremiah Bolaños jump with enthusiasm after winning their final CBL game of the 2021-22 basketball season in an overtime clincher. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Meet Redlands East Valley new counselor, Arline Troncoza

By SPENCER MOORE

Arline Troncoza is the newest addition to Redlands East Valley High School counseling staff. Troncoza is just like a regular counselor; however, she specializes in helping freshman students acclimate to the high school experience as they transition from middle school distance learning that occurred over the 2019-2020 and the 2020-2021 school years. 

The freshman Counselor Arline Troncoza smiles for a photo. (SPENCER MOORE/ Ethic News photo).

Troncoza says, “Typically, freshmen are mixed into the alpha for all counselors. But, this year because they have a single counselor assigned just to them, they are able to receive more one-on-one support.”

Troncoza says that she wants “to provide as much support as possible to ease the transition.” 

Troncoza would like the students at REV to know that she was the first person in her family to attend college, earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology at California State University, San Bernardino. 

Troncoza further cemented her place in her family legacy by being the first person to also attend and complete a master’s degree, continuing her education at California State University, San Bernardino.

As a student, Troncoza was very introverted and didn’t ask for help because she didn’t feel that there was any for her. 

As the new freshman counselor, she plans to help students who possibly feel the same way as she did to be as successful as possible. She plans to do this by being available for her students’ needs including social, academic or even if they just need someone to talk to. 

“This is my passion, being a counselor is not just a job for me, it’s something that I love to do, and I’m here for the students who need me,’’ Troncoza says.

Troncoza further details efforts that the counseling department has put in place for this new, post-distance learning Class of 2025, saying, “The goal is to be a bit more preventative to prepare them for the next three years, so we are doing whole class presentations and academic interventions for those who are struggling with grades.”

“I try to put myself in their shoes, and try to share similar struggles that I had when I was a student, to let them know that they are not alone, and that it is possible to get past the obstacles that they may be going through,” Troncoza says. 

One piece of advice that Troncoza thinks that every freshman would benefit from hearing and adhering to is “to not be afraid to ask for help.”

Troncoza says, “This is a new phase of your life, and high school is very different from middle school, so if one is struggling, ask us for help, ask us to teach you what we don’t know.”

Arline Troncoza is here for every freshman that may need her, and she wants everyone on campus to know that the counseling department is there for them, no matter what their need may require.

Redlands East Valley High School’s Executive Cabinet election begins

By MAURICIO PLIEGO

The Associated Student Body at Redlands East Valley High School is organizing its annual Executive Cabinet election for the incoming class of 2023 Seniors. The election ballot will become open on a Google Form on Feb. 9, with two candidates for three positions such as president, vice-president, and secretary with treasurer having no challenger for the position. Voting ends on Feb. 11.

An image depicting a person casting a vote in an election. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News image)

Candidates for President

Marin Mohr

Marin Mohr is a current junior and candidate for the Executive President position. She has worked the last three years as class president and is saddened that this will be her last year campaigning but is hopeful for what the future may hold.

Marin Mohr, a junior, works in hopes to maintain her place as class president of the Class of 2023. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Marin Mohr is a current junior and candidate for the Executive President position. She has worked the last three years as class president and is saddened that this will be her last year campaigning but is hopeful for what the future may hold.

She has been involved in Cheer for three years and is an honors student. Mohr plans to attend a four-year college.

Mohr describes herself as a dedicated, compassionate and ambitious person. She loves being with friends, going to the beach and listening to music. She prefers to spend her free time with loved ones and traveling. 

Mohr says, “I love REV’s inclusivity, school spirit, teachers, staff and all the positivity.”

If she is elected, she plans to continue her goals for the Class of 2023 as well as setting an example for the classes to follow.

Mohr says, “I have many fun ideas for school activities coming up and want to create the best possible senior year.”

Brooklynn Rios

Currently, junior Brooklynn Rios is a candidate for the Executive President position for the incoming school year. She is an involved student on campus as she is currently the Vice-president for Compact Club and Helping Hands, a member of the varsity Song Cheer, Track and Field, National Honors Society and the California Scholarship Federation.

Brooklynn Rios, a junior, hopes to become each “student’s biggest advocate” when she becomes Executive President.(MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Rios describes herself as self-motivated, creative and organized. She loves Italian food, the color pink and blasting music in the car. She prefers to use her free time with friends, go to the gym, play games with her family and watch Netflix. 

She plans to attend Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California and study business marketing. 

Rios loves the atmosphere at REV and the dedication of the students.  

She says, “Students work their absolute hardest to achieve their goals and they are always striving for the next best thing.”

If she is elected, she plans to bring Summer Fest back because she believes that it is important to continue making memories in high school. Rios would like to bring more recognition to students in performing arts, band, sports and choir. 

Rios says, “I feel our students do such amazing work, and all groups on campus deserve equal recognition.”

Candidates for Vice-President

Max Cannon

Max Cannon is a junior at REV who would consider himself observant, ambitious and driven. He loves country music, shoes, sushi and prefers using his free time with friends and playing video games. 

Max Cannon, a junior, hopes to maintain his position as Vice-president as he is being challenged for the spot by Ryder Freeman.(MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Cannon is involved in varsity swimming, NHS, CSF, and Key Club and has been Vice-President for three consecutive years and hopes to gain a fourth.

He hopes to attend Brigham Young University and gain a Ph.D. in American History.

He says, “I did an Eagle Scout Project here by fixing and painting the Blackstone theater.”

Cannon loves the atmosphere that REV promotes and supports and believes that many of his teachers have had a lasting impact on him. He has enjoyed the Litterbox for both basketball and football games as it truly showed how energized the student body is.

He hopes to keep doing the work he has done the last three years and to incorporate the REVWAY into the campus.

Ryder Freeman

Ryder Freeman is a current junior at REV who would describe himself as communicative, a perfectionist and open-minded. He loves animals, being helpful and doing anything related to ASB.

Ryder Freeman, a junior, challenges Max Cannon for the Vice-President position in hopes to change the ASB System. (DANIELA MORA/Ethic News photo)

He says, “I find that I’m happiest and most productive when doing stuff that doesn’t only serve myself.”

In Freeman’s free time, he prefers to play games, spend time with his pets and be on his phone. Besides ASB, he has small involvement in Wildcats For Change.

After he graduates, he plans to spend a year helping and working for some of the teachers at REV and continue ASB, and hopefully attend college afterward. 

If he is elected Executive Vice-President, he would like to address them and hopefully amend the toxicity in the class.

Freeman says, “I feel that a lot of opinions and different backgrounds are invalidated in it and I want to try and make it a class that is as welcoming as it can be.”

He hopes to become a mentor for any incoming new members of the class.

Candidates for Secretary

Morgan Dawson

As part of the graduating Class of 2023, Morgan Dawson has been secretary for two years and part of ASB for four years by the end of her senior year.

Morgan Dawson, a junior, is the current Secretary for the class of 2023 and has maintained that position for two consecutive years and hopes to finish high school with a third.(MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Dawson describes herself as positive, loving and meticulous. She feels that these are the qualities that leaders at REV should have. She loves soccer, the color pink and Açai Bowls. She spends her free time playing soccer, going to the beach with friends and driving around listening to music. 

She is currently part of the varsity soccer team and she hopes to attend a four-year college and live somewhere on the coast. 

Dawson says, “I love the environment of being at the beach and hope to someday live there and continue to grow as a person by getting to experience the joys of college.”

She loves the environment at REV as she feels loved and welcomed by everyone and feels that the school has given her a good foundation to enjoy her years in high school

If Dawson wins, she hopes she will be able to help lead the school in a very loving and uplifting way. She loves helping others and showing them what ASB truly stands for. 

She says, “I have enjoyed the things I have done to prepare for the position of Executive Secretary over the years and hope to lead the school in a positive way.”

Faith Morales

Faith Morales, a junior at REV, describes herself as outgoing, compassionate, and creative and loves Italian food, comedy movies and her family and friends.

Faith Morales hopes to contribute to the Class of 2023 through the Secretary Position.(MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

She is an involved student by being involved in Link Crew, Founder and President of Investment Club, cross country and basketball. Morales is a member of Key Club, Compact Club and Christian Club.

In her free time, she loves playing the guitar, listening to chill R&B music, spending time with friends, and being outdoors such as skateboarding, hiking, and running. 

Morales says, “I hope to go to a four-year university, get a bachelor’s in kinesiology and travel across the globe helping third-world countries by being a teacher and occupational therapist.”

She has plenty of leadership experience as she has helped manage family business accounts on both Facebook and Instagram. Morales has created various websites and social platforms to market businesses and has interned in Marketing Communications with her father for three years. 

Morales says, “I also have great time management skills from doing ASB, taking all AP classes, working part-time and volunteering at church 1-2 times a week.”

She hopes to be elected as Executive Secretary to be able to work cooperatively with other executive members to create a safer and more inclusive student body. Morales hopes to incorporate more inclusive events and be open to trying new things.

She says, “I speak for you, so any suggestions you have for next year, I will be sure to bring them up in our meetings.”

Treasurer

Nathan Derry

Nathan Derry is a current junior who was not challenged for his position as Executive Treasurer for the incoming school year. He considers himself to be outgoing, fun and thoughtful. Derry loves sushi, video games and the color blue.

Nathan Derry is a current junior who is excited to be Executive Treasurer for the Class of 2023 for the incoming school year. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

He spends his free time riding dirt bikes and cliff jumping. Derry hopes to go to a decent college and start a career in computer science. 

Derry says, “I think REV has a great environment and even though not all our sports are great, our student section is.”

Wildcats’ boys varsity basketball team triumphs over Terriers 62-50

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

The Redlands East Valley High School Wildcats were looking for a rematch with their cross-town rival Redlands High School Terriers on Jan. 31, three days after the Terriers had beat the Wildcats in intense game of back-and-forth with a score of 51-48 on Jan. 28.

Although REV had lost against RHS by three points, the Wildcats’ boys’ basketball team had momentum after winning first in the San Bernardino Kiwanis Tournament last Saturday, Jan. 29, 2022. 

On Monday, Jan. 31, 2022, the Wildcats faced the Terriers in the RHS main gym. 

Both students and teachers attended the game from REV and RHS; the Wildcats’ previous athletic director Rhonda Fouch had come to watch the game as well as the varsity girls’ basketball coach Robert Tompkins.

Whenever a steal, three-pointer, layup or good play was executed, students from both REV and RHS erupted in cheers or jeers. 

By the end of the third quarter, the game was at a tie of 39-39 with three fouls for RHS and six fouls for REV.

If either team hoped to win the game, they both had to leave their best on the court that night.

There was slight discourse throughout the game including the referees assigning fouls to the wrong players and a player from REV and RHS slightly arguing, but despite this, the game continued.

Energetic cheers were thrown across the gym from both REV and RHS’ sides and the echoing acoustics of the gym amplified their loud cheers.

The eventful game ended with a score of 62-50 giving the Wildcats’ their sixteenth win for their boys’ varsity basketball team.

RHS had beaten REV by three points last game, but REV made sure to leave their mark by defeating RHS by 12 points.

Tonight, Feb. 4,  the Wildcats will have their final game and senior night at the REV gym against Yucaipa High School at REV at 7 p.m.. Not only is it a final game for their seniors, but also for their head coach Bill Berich.

Redlands High School sophomore Connor Clem practices free throw shots during warmups on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

During warmup, the Wildcats’ varsity boys’ basketball team huddle and talk before they continue back into their practice shooting. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: For the Wildcats, it came down to defense to start their adrenaline to run, and for the Terriers, it came down to their quick passes and offense to excel during the game. The student section for REV, in the far left of the picture, supported the Wildcats’ team through their cheers. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw attempts to block a three pointer from Redlands High School senior Elijah Hester. RHS managed to get multiple three pointers around the three point line which helped them to get a lead during the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Arnie Corpus guards Redlands High School senior Mateo Toledo on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. The defense from the Wildcats helped to stop the Terriers’ movement of the ball and possibility to score further. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School junior Jeremiah Bolaños shoots from the three point line during the second quarter in the Terrier gym on Jan. 31. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Spirited and joyous yelling could be heard, especially from the RHS students. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands High School senior guard Cooper Bell, defended by Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw, helps to move the ball around for the Terriers on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands High School senior point guard Elijah Hester, defended by Wildcat junior Jeremiah Bolaños, manages to drive, pass and open up the court for a chance to either deliver a jump shot or drive in the Terrier gym on Jan. 31. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Jadyn Hardy brings up the ball while being guarded by Redlands High School senior Elijah Hester on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The Wildcat Litterbox supported their team despite the team being down in points during some parts of the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: The game ended with the Wildcats winning 62 to 50 and both teams in the double bonus. RHS and REV lined up, clapped each other’s hands, and left the gym to chat with friends and family about the eventful game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Wildcats’ first Spring Sports Fair encourages athletic participation

By ETHIC NEWS STAFF

The Redlands East Valley Associated Student Body hosted their first Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28 during lunch in order to recruit more players and fans to support the spring sports season.

This is the first year that a sports fair was organized as well as the first year for the new Athletic Director Chad Blatchley. Blatchley is now in charge of the day-to-day workings of all the sports programs at REV. With the help of the ASB and the sports representatives, he was able to organize the Spring Sports Fair.

Blatchley said, “We wanted to get more fans coming to games and build support. We plan to have a fall sports day.”

In order for students to participate in any sport, students must have a current physical, fill out a clearance form on the REV website, turn it into the office to the athletics secretary Gabi Heinel and wait for an email that confirms that they have been cleared to participate.

Softball

Softball is looking for new players for their junior varsity and freshman teams. Some tryouts have already occurred and more tryouts are coming soon.

Sophomore Ivy Walker is looking forward to having a full season since last year’s season was short due to the lack of pre-season games. 

Peyton Angelini, a senior at REV, said, “Just come out and have fun and try something new.”

Boys golf

Boys golf will be under new leadership this year with coach Jake Ducey. Ducey, a current physical education teacher at REV, played golf at REV and the University of Redlands. 

Senior Bailey Jung joined the golf team his sophomore year and feels that he has improved greatly since then. 

“It helps you learn to keep your cool, helps you learn proper etiquette, and be a better person,” said Jung. 

Due to not having a golf course on campus, the team practices at the Redlands Country Club and Oak Valley Golf Club in Beaumont. 

The team will compete in a Beaumont golf tournament at the Morongo Golf Club at Tukwet Canyon on March 14.

Redlands East Valley High School seniors Bailey Jung, Patrick McIntyre, Alex Miller and Kadin Khalloufi advertise the boys golf team during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Track and field

Track and field is unique in that it has various events to partake in: sprints, jumps, hurdles, long-distance and throws. Despite not having an all-weather track, REV’s track and field team competes in Division 2 in CIF. The team’s head coaches are Camille Andreas and Matt Sartori. 

Redlands East Valley High School junior Craig Morrison speaks to Track and Field players, seniors Felix Espericueta and Keyvon Rankin, about the incoming season during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Senior Felix Espericueta, a sprinter on the team, said, “It’s interesting to meet new people and see what their passions are about sports.”

Track and field’s first meet will take place against San Bernardino High School at San Bernardino on Feb. 22 at 3 p.m.

Badminton

The badminton team, the only co-ed sport on campus, including the fall season, encourages students to represent the Wildcats on the court.

Badminton players Quinn Larson, Ashley Hernandez Osorio, Angelita Cornejo Talavera, Prescott Neiswender and Arnie James Corpus collect sign-ups at their table during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Ted Ducey, the head coach of the badminton team, says, “My favorite element of badminton is the fast pace and approachability—there are so many strategies, that just about everyone regardless of physical ability can find some key role to play on the court.” 

Ducey, also mentioned some of the more unique aspects of badminton, saying, “A few things that make badminton unique include that it is the only sport on campus that has one team for both boys and girls. Another interesting thing about badminton is that it is very approachable for newcomers.”

Join badminton if interested in an opportunity for exercise and making lasting, strong bonds with fellow teammates.

Boys tennis

The tennis team is looking forward to new players, especially with the season starting in a few weeks. Because of COVID-19 lockdown, the boys’ team was prevented from having a full and proper season. They are confident that will have a complete season this year.

“Honestly, I don’t think it will affect us much because the last two seasons were very rough due to COVID-19. And as difficult as it was, we still continued to play through it,” says Logan Wells, REV senior and boys varsity tennis captain. 

“I’m looking forward to the whole season, but specifically our match against RHS because it is our biggest match of the season,” continues Wells. 

Tennis players Abigail Washburn, Maryn Strong, Denver Neff, Colin Hawkins, Dorothy Clerk, Logan Wells and Hayden Rentz encourage students to join their sport during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Baseball

Going into the spring season, the REV baseball team is looking for new players. Daren Espinoza is the coach for the REV Baseball team. If interested in joining the team, there are available positions.

Senior Emmanuel Palos, who plays pitcher and field, says, “It’s cool, I’ve never done it before.”

Sophomore Donovan Gonzalez, who plays first base and pitcher, says he is excited about the spring season. 

Redlands East Valley High School students Devynn Heller, Cameron Leaney, Korbin Fickett, Dayton Thompson, George Cordero, Laviel Pickett, Emmanuel Palos, Aidan Hermosillo, AJ Daniel and Donavan Gonzalez represent baseball with their sweatshirts at their table. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Boys volleyball

The REV boys volleyball team is asking to have Wildcats’ support. If interested in joining the team, positions are available. Supporting fellow Wildcats from the bleachers is appreciated, as well. 

Senior varsity player Aiden Hernandez said, “I’m excited that other students that might not know about certain sports get an opportunity to find other sports they might be interested in.” 

Hernandez adds that he believes that this fair is “to get more athletic involvement in the spring sports because fall sports are more popular, like football. Spring sports are not as popular with the student body.” 

The boys volleyball team is currently having sign-ups and will be holding their first open gym clinic on Feb. 1 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wildcat Gym. 

Boys volleyball will have their first away game on Feb. 25 against Martin Luther King High School with junior varsity at 3:15 p.m. and varsity at 4:30 p.m.

Redlands East Valley High School seniors Aiden Hernandez and Noah Snodgrass represent boys’ volleyball in hopes of gaining more support and new players for their upcoming season during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo) 

Swim

The swim team adds new coach and REV teacher Austin Brown to their coaching staff this year. Many new swimmers have signed up, but the team is still looking for new players. Interested students are encouraged to contact coaches. 

 Joined by coaches Julianne Ford and Austin Brown, swimmers Bryce Coen, Nathan Derry, Max Cannon, Gregory Coffield, Ethan Geureca, Emma Guerrero, Anastasia Tardie, Isabella Martinez Spencer and Nico Perna help gather new recruits during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/ Ethic News photo)

Ethan Guereca, a junior at REV, said, “As I saw more and more people sign up, it got me excited for the season. With the help of Mr. Brown, Mrs. Ford and all the other coaches that come out to help, I believe that myself and several others would improve as swimmers.”

Reminiscing of his first season, Guereca said, “As of competition-wise I think it would be better than we did last year. Last year was my first year being on a swim team and participating in swim meets and I was nervous and several others were the same as me. Now that I’m more experienced with how everything works I would be less nervous I was last year and I believe others on the swim team think the same way.”

Juliann Ford, assistant swim coach, said “We have the best workouts and we’re just the best.”

Editor’s note: Walker’s name was mistakenly published as Ivy Wilder in the original post. It has since been corrected on Jan. 28 at 11:09 p.m.

Redlands East Valley’s Black Student Union promotes community book drive

By MIA ARANDA

Redlands High School and Redlands East Valley High School’s Black Student Unions as well as community non-profit organization Stronger Together Now have collaborated to host a book drive. 

All books will be donated to Superabilitee, a tutoring service in San Bernardino. Superabilitee’s staff works with students one-on-one to help improve their literacy. 

The book drive started on Jan. 17 and will last until Jan. 28. Lightly used or new book donations are requested ranging from a kindergarten to a fifth-grade level. 

“The book drive was initiated by the friendship between the advisor at RHS BSU and one of our advisors here at REV’s BSU. Both have worked together with Stronger Together Now,” said REV BSU co-advisor La’Rena Garcia. “All three agree on the importance of giving back and taking care of our community.” 

RHS will accept book drop-offs in classroom 450 and the office and REV in classrooms J-33, J-10, J-22 and the office. 

In addition, REV BSU is hosting a raffle with the chance to win a Foodie Gift Basket to encourage participation. Students receive one raffle ticket for each book that they donate. Raffle winners will be announced on Friday, Jan. 28, at lunch. 

Redlands East Valley High School Black Student Union co-advisor Duan Kellum, sophomore Alma Shelly King, junior Myla Gibson and senior Keyvon Rankin manage a booth at lunch on Jan. 25 to collect book donations. For every book a student donates, they will receive a raffle ticket to be entered into a raffle drawing for a Foodie Gift Basket. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

“One person brought like 45 books to the book drive,” said REV BSU member and senior Keyvon Rankin.

Fellow REV BSU member and senior Timothy Berry adds, “Some teachers have brought like over 60.”

REV BSU will be in the quad at lunch collecting book donations until the end of this week. 

As of Jan. 25, REV BSU has collected approximately 150 books from students and staff. 

On Sat., Jan. 22, the community had the opportunity to drop-off books in downtown Redlands from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., in which 100 books were collected, according to Garcia. 

The book drive ends on Friday, Jan. 28. 

Redlands School District gives students free COVID tests as cases rise

As a result of the surge of COVID-19 cases, RUSD schools distributed these rapid antigen tests to students today. (BELLA ESPINOZA/Ethic News)  

By ETHIC NEWS STAFF

The Redlands Unified School District distributed iHealth COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test at-home self-test kits for all RUSD students on Jan. 12. Each student was to receive a kit that contained two tests. 

Teachers and staff were given specific instructions as to how to distribute the tests and to give only one test kit per student. If a student was absent, teachers were to return their kit to the front office. 

Students were informed that there was only one test kit per student. Therefore if they lost or destroyed theirs, it would not be replaced. They were told to not self administer the test during school, but rather when they arrived home.  

Citrus Valley High School received their COVID test kits during second period. An announcement was made before teachers handed out one to each student.

Redlands High School students received their test kits during fourth period. 

Redlands East Valley High School students received their test during their English class. REV students got their tests during different periods.

Orangewood High School students received their COVID tests during their second period advisory class. 

On Jan. 12, an email was sent out to families of the RUSD by Redlands Schools Districts stating, “The test kits were provided for all students in the state of California by Governor Newsom and the California Department of Public Health.”

These tests would normally be $19.80 according to the iHealth website, but were provided for free to all RUSD students.   

Number of confirmed COVID cases in the Redlands Unified School District’s high schools in the last 14 days from Jan. 12, 2021. (Redlands Unified School District Covid Dashboard https://www.redlandsusd.net/Page/18775

Video: Students show their skills in Redlands East Valley’s Talent Show

Created by ELLA FITZPATRICK

On Nov. 19, Redlands East Valley Highschool hosted the annual talent show at 6 p.m. in the Blackstone Theater located on campus. The show consisted of 14 students of all grades who showcased their talents for three cash prizes for the top three winners. The first place winner, Eric Napoletano, won a one-hundred dollar cash prize for his performance on the drums playing “Tom Sawyer.” The packed crowd was also treated with a surprise performance from the Eduskators, the REV teacher band of Doug Porter and Andrew Hoch. 

The Marching Wildcats end season at finals


By JOHNATHAN GHAZAL

Redlands East Valley High School marching band advanced to Division 3A finals on Nov. 20. Their success in previous competitions allowed them to reach the finals.

Prior to the Great Orange Classic, REV received first place at the Citrus Valley Classic on Oct. 2 at Citrus Valley High School and fourth place at the Mustang Classic on Oct. 16 at West Valley High School while Citrus Valley had received third place and fifth place. 

On Oct. 21, the Wildcats used the Blackhawks’ Hodges stadium to finish learning their sets and positions for their performance, “The Artist.” 

Marching band is a large time commitment that involves practice sessions, the loading and unloading of the trailer, and setting up the props. It takes a whole team of students and parents to simply get all the equipment to each practice away from REV, as they do not currently have a football field.

The Marching Wildcats perform their show “The Artist” on Oct. 22 at Ramona High School. They are performing one of their squatting visuals. (Courtesy of Richelle Ghazal)

Wildcat High Winds Captain, Carlos Cruz, said that the key to success for the band as a team and in competition is the strong bond that they have formed after having spent many hours together.

“We [have] spent over 200 hours together since school started,” said Cruz. 

In addition, the majority of the REV band members attended band camp over the summer before the school year began.

Since the Citrus Valley Classic, the Wildcats have admitted that their enthusiasm and focus have waned. Practices have not been as productive as others have been. However, through the determination of the band members, they have been able to improve their score each time throughout the following competitions.

At Ramona High School in Riverside, they performed the entire show and used their newly painted black props for the first time in competition on Oct. 22. 

After the performance, Sarah Bocanegra, a sophomore REV tenor saxophone player, said, “[I’m] tired. [It was] well worth it, and [I feel] relieved.” 

After the other bands performed that afternoon, the awards were distributed with the scores read out by the announcer. Citrus Valley placed seventh with a score of 74 points and REV placed third with a score of 76.30 points. 

Daisy Felipe, a sophomore REV alto saxophone player, said, “I feel we did our best, and we all deserve what we got. We will keep pushing further.”

The next competition for the Marching Wildcats occured at San Gorgonio High School. They scored 79 points earning third place, followed by the semi-finals in Mission Viejo where they scored 80.79 points in 12th place, qualifying them to compete at the finals amongst 14 other bands. 

Having advanced into the finals on Nov. 20, they placed 11th with a score of 81 points at Newport Harbor High School in Newport Beach.

Marching Wildcats perform at Newport Harbor High School for the California State Band Championships finals on Nov. 20. They are seen without their colorful smocks, as they transition into the “Painted Black” portion of the show. (Courtesy of Richelle Ghazal)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat athlete chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School athlete Laviel Pickett. Pickett responds to questions such as “What his go-to-hype song is before a game,” “If he’s ever slid into someone’s Dm’s,” and more. As always, Pickett answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Involved Wildcat senior chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Sadeen Elfaqir. Elfaqir talks about her life inside of school, what her favorite hobbies are and much more including some fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

(ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News video)

Students cite safety and choice in response to potential vaccine mandate

By MIYAH SANBORN and AVA LARSON

On Oct. 1, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced plans to require the vaccines for the 2022-2023 school year. The upcoming school vaccine mandate is causing many controversies within school districts, parents, and students.

According to the California Office of Governor Oct. 1 press release, “After implementing first-in-the-nation school masking and staff vaccination measures, California becomes the first state to announce plans to require student vaccinations – adding the COVID-19 vaccine to list of vaccinations required for school, such as the vaccines for measles, mumps, and rubella Students will be required to be vaccinated for in person learning starting the term following FDA full approval of the vaccine for their grade span (7-12 and K-6).”

Students at Redlands East Valley High School express different opinions on the issue.

“I feel like it’s definitely needed, it’s very important that all of us are safe and have the vaccine and I’m definitely for it,” says Isabella Estrada, REV sophomore.

By making the vaccine mandatory, some students believe that life on campus would become a lot safer for the students and the teachers. 

“I feel like it’s really definitely needed because a lot of people, at this school specifically, and I guess every school, really don’t follow covid guidelines, and at least if they were vaccinated it would be a little bit better.”Says Samantha Covarrubias  a sophomore at REV. 

While some expressed that the vaccine mandate is necessary to stop the spread of COVID-19, others worry about the side effects that getting the vaccine may cause.

“I think it’s stupid because of the problems it causes. Women who are in their like 70’s and 80’s who are hemorrhaging and getting their periods all over again, and then there’s infertility with younger women, and it’s causing deaths, and a bunch of other stuff that’s not good for humanity,” said REV sophomore Ashley Ranabuer.

There are also students at REV who believe that it is unnecessary and unfair to force the vaccine on those who do not want to get the vaccine. 

“Myself, next year if it becomes a mandate I’m not going to go to school. It is your own choice so if you would like to get it, you can get it, if you don’t want to get it you don’t have to get it, it shouldn’t be pressured,” said REV Junior Molly Sullivan. 

REV sophomore Anabelle Alviso, says “I’m also against it. I mean get it if you want but I don’t think it should be forced for us to go to school, because what are all the kids who can’t get the vaccine because of what their parents’ going to do? Just go straight to online, lose all their friends. I don’t think it should be forced to go to school, but I think it would be a good thing, Not to have it forced, but for it to be like you should get it but we’re not going to force it.”  

Joelene Kidlay, REV sophomore, agrees with Kidlay and says, “I’m against it. I don’t think we should have a vaccine mandate. It kind of goes against our constitutional rights because you know we have the freedom of speech and stuff like that, but that’s not really what it is. If you’re forcing your citizens to get the vaccine, that’s…, because now it’s political. Even if the vaccine is science, it’s political now so you can’t force everyone to get it.”

The cast of ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ shares their preparation for the production

By ALISSON BERMUDEZ and ISAAC MEJIA

Redlands East Valley High School Theater Department brought Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest” from print to live production. Set in Victorian London, “The Importance of Being Earnest” is a comedic play with an equal amount of satire and drama.

Students from the Moderate-Severe program were given an opportunity to present themselves in this production during the garden party scene where they sat and spectated discussions between Gwendolen and Cecily. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

The play stars a pair of Englishmen, John Worthing played by Keyvon Rankin and Algernon Moncrieff played by Aiden Gonzalez, who falls in love with two young women—Gwendolen Fairfax played by Megan Rimmer and Cecily Cardew played by Evie O’Brien.

At the end of the play, the entire stage production team bowed and received a round of applause from the audience. The stage production team worked to change the stage’s scenery and props a total of three times during the play. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Both men lie to the women and claim their names are Ernest. The women immediately become infatuated with them and the men are placed into a difficult, comedic situation as they try to continue the charade.

From stage production to costume changes to memorizing lines, putting together a play requires lots of dedication and hard work. With the play being almost two and a half hours long, actors set aside a lot of time preparing for the live performance.

Aiden Gonzalez (left) and Keyvon Rankin (right) stare intently at each other.  During the play, the actor’s characters, Algernon Moncrieff and John Worthing, often have opposite attitudes and opinions. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Keyvon Rankin, a senior at REV said, “I memorized my lines and most importantly, had to work on my British accent. Having already an accent of my own, practicing my British accent has been the most difficult.”

Rankin continued, “Memorizing with an accent is a whole other thing than just memorizing a line period. When you add an accent to it, you still have to convey what the line is trying to give.”

In Act 1, Keyvon Rankin and Megan Rimmer’s characters first meet each other. Throughout the play, Rankin’s character continuously seeks Rimmer’s character’s hand in marriage. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Ella Fletcher, a senior at REV, plays Lady Bracknell, Gwendolen’s controlling mother, and she believes she prepared for the role “too much.”

Fletcher said, “I memorized and memorized and memorized until my brain was dead.”  

Ella Fletcher poses at the end of the play as the audience applauded her for her performance of Lady Bracknell. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Some of the actors including Fletcher, Gonzalez and Jonathan Black, a senior at eAcademy and Algernon’s manservant in the production, mentioned that they have had previous play experience that helped them prepare for their role.

Black said that his experience had “given [him] an idea on what he needed to do and what things [he] needed to prepare for.”

Adam Garcia, a junior at REV, plays Rev. Canon Chasuble. Garcia said that it is actually the audience who helps him improve his portrayal of his character.

“I want the audience to feel what I am trying to portray,” he said. “I can gage the way I act, or how dramatic and funny I am based on the audience’s reactions.”

Evie O’Brien and Aiden Gonzalez stand close to one another during the play. O’Brien who plays Cecily Cardew is Gonzalez’s love interest throughout the play. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Similar to how each actor prepares differently for their role, they all appreciate different aspects of the play process.

“I enjoy the professionalism of this theater and the play itself, ” Gonzalez said.

Unlike his time in middle school theater, “the set pieces and costumes actually make [him] feel more intrigued with the play itself.”

Patricia Musselman, a freshman at REV, plays Merriman the butler and agrees with Gonzalez on the influence costumes can have on an individual’s performance.

“The costumes help me feel more confident on stage,” said Musselman.

Megan Rimmer and Evie O’Brien embrace each other during the second act of the play. Their characters establish a friendship after learning that both of their lovers lied about their names being Ernest. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Megan Rimmer, a senior at REV, acknowledged that playing a character whose personality is completely different from hers makes the play really fun.

“I feel like characters that are not similar to me are the most fun to get into because it’s acting more. You have to make yourself to be this extravagant person that you’re not really, so you have to act,” Rimmer said.

Keyvon Rankin’s character, John Worthing, gets on his knees as he talks to his governess, Miss Prism, who is played by Rose Blatchley. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

Rankin said his favorite part of the play process was “seeing it all come together. We all started off sitting in a circle reading the script and this small little thing turned into a bigger production that people can come and see for themselves: to witness all the work and time we have put in so they can enjoy.”  

He further said that he finds the whole process to be fun.

“I have the opposite of stage fright,” he said. “Watch me, I am the attention.”

In Act 3, all the characters gather around a table as the lead character, John Worthing, discovers that his actual name is Ernest. (ELLA FITZPATRICK/ Ethic News photo)

The actors performed the play live for audiences three nights in a row. Due to current COVID-19 guidelines, they had to perform with masks on for the entirety of the play. Despite this challenge, the actors still delivered their best performances and the play consisted of a well rounded cast, featuring actors from the moderate-severe classes and Redlands eAcademy. 

Community fundraises for Wildcat hero

By MIA ARANDA

After a Redlands East Valley High School student, Ayden Lagrand, sustained injuries following a car crash on Oct. 22, the community has been supportive by raising money for his recovery.

According to GoFundMe fundraiser organizer REV senior Ralph Veach, two students were caught in a car accident, in which the REV senior Lagrand, who had flown out of the crashed truck, rescued his friend from the flaming truck. As a result, he suffered substantial second and third-degree burns.

As of Nov. 17, the GoFundMe page has raised $18,148.

The car accident took place in the parking lot of Hops and Spokes Brewing Company, a family-owned brewery in Yucaipa.

On Oct. 27, Hops and Spokes Brewing Company hosted a fundraiser from 4 to 9 p.m. in which $1 from each pint of beer and root beer would be donated to the Lagrand family.

As a result, $6,458.68 was raised, according to Hops and Spokes Brewing Company.

At school, the REV Associated Student Body students brainstormed ideas of how they could get the school involved to support Lagrand, and ultimately, they decided on hosting a food day.

Photo 1: Redlands East Valley High School junior Carson Bascom serves hot dogs as a part of Link Crew during Food Day on Nov. 5. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 2: Redlands East Valley High School senior Leilani Baldwin sells peppermint bark to senior Melody Kamgar Haghighi as a part of Thespians during Food Day on Nov. 5. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 3: A poster for Redlands East Valley High School senior Ayden Lagrand features “get well soon” messages from fellow students during Food Day on Nov. 5. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 4: A sign from the Redlands East Valley High School class of 2025 encourages students to purchase donuts from them to help support REV senior Ayden Lagrand and his family during Food Day on Nov. 5. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Clubs sold food items all for the benefit of Lagrand’s recovery. In the end, around $5,000 was raised for Ayden.

“It actually blew me away as it exceeded even my expectations,” said REV ASB advisor Matt Fashempour. “This school really shined as the students literally purchased everything that was offered.  Not one item was left by the end of the event.”

Lea este artículo en español aquí: https://ethic-news.org/2021/11/18/noticias-breves-recaudacion-de-fondos-de-la-comunidad-para-el-heroe-wildcat/

Redlands East Valley takes home the smudge pot

 By CRAIG MORRISON

The Smudge Pot game took place on Oct. 15 between the Redlands East Valley Wildcats and the Redlands High School Terriers.

The Smudge Pot game was a thrill to watch. Fierce competition was present in the field and stands as the game ran into two overtimes. 

In the first quarter of the game, both teams showed great defense. The ball hardly moved from the Terrier’s end zone as both defenses were making great stops. 

The first touchdown graced the audience in the second quarter with a passing play that resulted in a 7-0 lead for the Wildcats. After this touchdown, Redlands High School made a fantastic kickoff return that would have tied the game; if the flags were not against them. Shortly after, the Terriers threw long for a touchdown to make the score 7-7. This tie would stay for the remainder of the first half of the game.

Redlands East Valley, in the red uniforms, attempting a field goal kick against Redlands High School, in the blue and white uniforms. This field goal kick by the Wildcats to win the game in overtime was just shy of the uprights. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News photo)

Seven minutes into the third quarter, the Terriers threw another touchdown to make the score 14-7. Tension and excitement was audible in the stands as chants and cheers increased. Two fumbles by the Wildcats and Terriers were seen before the end of the third quarter resulting in the Wildcats having possession going into the fourth.

After another passing play by the Wildcats, the score was once again tied at 14-14 with 9 minutes left of the fourth quarter. The defense increased dramatically on both sides as the clock winded down. 

The last two minutes of the game seemed to crawl by. The Wildcats were holding the Terriers to their end zone and created many attempts to get a touchdown. With just a few seconds remaining before the last quarter ended, the Wildcats attempted a field goal kick to win the game. As the game clock expired, the ball was sent flying into the air, heading just right of the uprights. This sent the game into overtime.

The Terriers started with the ball in overtime. They began a drive that led to an almost game winning touchdown pass. But, it was blocked by the Wildcat defensive player Nate Wells. The Terriers decided to finish their overtime possession with a field goal kick that was just shy of making it in, giving the ball to the Wildcats.

The Wildcats used many quarterback runs to gain yards in their drive. A few long shots were seen but were unsuccessful. The Wildcats resorted to a field goal kick that went to the Terriers sideline and stayed in bounds. This was recovered by the Terriers and almost led to a win for the Terriers, if not for the Wildcat kicker Yaqiym Halliburton. 

The second overtime of the game started with the Terriers’ drive but with no touchdown or field goal, giving possession to the Wildcats. The Wildcats moved the chains with more quarterback runs which ultimately showed little success. An unfair matchup was spotted on the field by Wildcats coaches with Wildcat receiver Laviel Pickett and Terrier cornerback number 15. The sizable height difference gave huge advantages to the Wildcat receiver. 

The Wildcats decided to use this matchup and threw up the ball to Pickett in the endzone. Pickett caught the ball and landed in the endzone, securing the Wildcats as the winners of the Smudge Pot game.

Redlands East Valley Wildcats holding up the Smudge Pot trophy. This win was no easy feat for the team, so the excitement was apparent. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News photo)

Both teams showed great effort. The suspense and tensions of the game made for an enjoyable experience that will leave many fans waiting in anticipation for next year.

Photos: Wildcats show creativity on ‘Anything but a backpack’ spirit day

By MIA ARANDA

Photos by AVA LARSON

Spreading to spirit weeks across the nation, the “Anything but a backpack day” trend has escalated in popularity as students approach unique alternatives to bringing their backpack to school.

Redlands East Valley High School held their “Anything but a backpack” spirit day on Wednesday, Oct. 28 as a part of their Halloween spirit week.

The idea is for students to creatively store their school supplies in a carrier that isn’t their everyday backpack. Although the possibilities were endless on what students brought, among some of these substitutes were ice coolers, strollers, mop buckets, suitcases and trash cans.

Photo 1: Redlands East Valley High School seniors Ebony Staten and Jalyn Gilkey bring a double baby stroller and a rolly chair on Oct. 28. (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 2: Redlands East Valley High School junior Raquel Van Diest pulls a mini metal shopping cart on Oct. 28.  (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 3: Redlands East Valley High School sophomores Haylee Lyon carries a bindle alongside her friend Ashley Ranabauer on Oct. 28.  (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 4: Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Jesse Mendez holds a Pampers Swaddlers box on Oct. 28. (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 5: Redlands East Valley High School junior Davinson Porto (left) pushes junior Xaviar Guardado (right) in a wagon on Oct. 28. (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 6: Redlands East Valley High School senior Kieran Robson carries a piano bench decorated with fake spider webs on Oct. 28.  (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Photo 7: Redlands East Valley High School junior Seth Bruer stands next to his mini fridge on Oct. 28.  (AVA LARSON/ Ethic News photo)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat executive president chats candidly 

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School Associated Student Body Executive President Shannon Cockerill. Cockerill answers questions about her life inside and outside of school as well as some fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the video. 

Photos: Wildcat varsity boys water polo team crushes Beaumont

By MIA ARANDA 

Redlands East Valley High School varsity boys water polo team defeated Beaumont High School with a score of 22-3 at REV’s pool on Oct. 18. Their win has allowed them to maintain their rank as first place in the Citrus Belt League.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Nick Sadowski (right) attempts to block passes from Beaumont High School’s Sean Dickinson (left) during the first quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Sadowski scored one goal overall in the first quarter. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photos)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Gavin Oliver dribbles the ball toward Beaumont High School’s half during the first quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Oliver had a total of five points scored throughout the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Beaumont High School goalie Noah Lopez attempts to defend a shot from Redlands East Valley High School junior Ruben Villanueva during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Lopez surrendered 22 goals throughout the game.  (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

REV secured the lead quickly as they were winning 8-0 by the end of the first quarter. REV seniors Gavin Oliver and Riley Bour tied for most goals in this quarter with three goals scored each.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Riley Bour receives an assist prompting him to successfully score against Beaumont High School during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Bour had a total of five goals scored during the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Beaumont High School’s William Peters prepares to pass the ball while being guarded by Redlands East Valley High School senior Ralph Veach during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Peters would go on to later score Beaumont’s third goal in the fourth quarter. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

By the end of the second quarter, REV maintained their spacious lead by continuing to not surrender any goals to BHS. They also scored nine goals in this quarter equating to a score of 17-0.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Nico Perna guards Beaumont High School’s Peter Williams during the third quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Perna had a total of three goals scored throughout the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

During the third quarter, Santino Nicassio-Ortiz scored the first goal for BHS while REV continued to gain five more goals.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Luca Smith guards the goal during the fourth quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. REV varsity water polo captain Gavin Oliver said, “Luca Smith [was] great in the goal. Not too many shots on the goal, but everytime there [was] one, it’s mostly blocked.” (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

With a final score of 22-3, Brady Hall and William Peters were able to score two additional goals for BHS during the fourth quarter. 

REV seniors and varsity captains Nico Perna and Gavin Oliver attribute their team’s strengths to being cohesive and adaptable. Perna and Oliver have both been playing water polo for about six years, thus have gained much experience. 

Oliver said, “If someone says to another person ‘hey, do this,’ they’ll do it right away. We listen to each other. We respect each other.” 

“Our current game plans are working pretty well and we can adapt quickly,” said Perna. 

Despite the win, Perna and Oliver express personal improvements they could have made during the game. 

Oliver said, “I feel like in this game, I could have made better passes. I made a few that were too high, too low, but if they were more accurate, we could have had two more goals maybe.” 

Perna feels he could have improved on his shooting.

The REV junior varsity boys water polo team also beat BHS following the varsity game on Oct. 25. The final score for junior varsity was 22-2. 

The REV junior varsity team captains are sophomores Zachary Cash and Lucas Torres.

Torres, who has been playing water polo for two years, said, “The JV team worked great together and excelled in defense. It’s amazing seeing how all our practices helped bond the team to where we can trust each other’s decisions versus how we first started.”

With the season wrapping up, Torres said, “I just hope all my boys had some fun and consider joining the club team [Renegades Waterpolo] or maybe continue next year if they’re up for it.”

REV varsity boys water polo will play in the CIF playoffs  on Nov. 13.