Teacher Feature Q&A: Karen Knudson Wilson welcomes students to Orangewood

By STEPHANIE ELENA PEREZ

Karen Knudson Wilson, is a teacher at Orangewood High School. She teaches American Government and OASIS. OASIS stands for Orientation, Assessment, Study Skills, Insight, Success. Every student who attends Orangewood, starts by taking the OASIS class for three weeks with Wilson and Stephanie Sachs, Foods and OASIS teacher. OASIS is an introduction class where students learn about the school, themselves and each other. For example, Wilson guides students through writing an essay about themselves, such as where they grew up, the school they came from and other topics. Students see Wilson as a caring teacher, and OASIS teachers as the “moms” of new students at Orangewood.

Wilson answer questions about her teaching career, interests, and people who influenced her.

How many years have you been teaching?

Wilson: I have been teaching for 14 years. Prior to teaching I was a school administrator and counselor. 

If you were able to choose a different career path would you still choose to teach or would you choose something else?

I really love being a teacher. Knowing I have a positive impact on young people means so much to me. I’d very likely choose being an educator all over again, even though I had the chance to go to law school.

Have you had a different job besides teaching?

Yes! I started out my career as an elementary school counselor and was then promoted into school administration overseeing counseling and intervention programs for a neighboring school district. When I became a mom I took some time off and returned to education (as a teacher) so I could be on the same schedule as my children.

What do you enjoy about being able to teach students?

I love the day to day fun teaching brings. Everyday is different, and it’s definitely never dull. What I enjoy most about educating students is helping them realize the decisions they make today will impact their future. 

What made you want to teach?  

I grew up with a mom who worked in public education for over 30 years. Seeing the impact she made on kids made me want to have a career with a purpose like that, too.

Did you have role models growing up? 

My parents were amazing role models. My dad served in the military, went to school at night, coached little league and still managed to make time for his family everyday. My mom took care of all of us and always made time to take us to practice, our games and the events with our friends. 

If so how were you influenced by them?

The best thing they did for me and my brothers is give us their time. It really shaped who I became as a person and a parent myself.

If you could, what advice would you give students?

Put down your cell phones. Try not to spend so much time watching everyone else’s life go by that you forget to live your own.

If you could travel anywhere in the world where would it be and why?

I love, love, love to travel and have been fortunate enough to visit many places around the world. I’d really like to make it to Bali and Greece someday…places by the water make me very happy. I also like to experience different cultures and foods.

Do you speak another language? If so what language do you speak and if you don’t, what language would you like to learn?

I know a little bit of Spanish and some ASL. I really wish I knew more!

What do you enjoy doing when you aren’t teaching? Do you have hobbies, interests?

When I’m not teaching I love to travel, read, cook and spend time with my family.

Do you have any goals you’d like to accomplish?

I would really like to move home closer to my parents. I’d also like to live by the beach someday and retire when there’s still plenty of time left to play and enjoy my life.

Is there something you would want people to know about you?

Playing little league baseball growing up and softball in high school led to a wonderful opportunity for me to attend college – I was the first person in my family to graduate.

Soul Food Fest unites students and Redlands community with Black culture

By MEANNA SMITH

Stronger Together Now, a community outreach organization, hosted their second Soul Food Fest on Sept. 11 at Ed Hales Park in Downtown Redlands. This event was sponsored by Chase Bank.

Stronger Together Now, the organizers of the event, set up a booth with an inspiring promotional banner advocating against racism and other prejudices. At this booth, t-shirts and tote bags could be purchased and a donation jar was available for people who would like to see more events like this in the Redlands  community.  (Ethic News photo)

This festival gives many Black owned businesses and organizations a chance to showcase their products or services. This festival was also a great way for the Black community to be recognized in the city of Redlands. The Soul Food Fest gave the local high school club Black Student Union a chance to connect with each other while also connecting with the community and its citizens.

Showcasing a game booth table with cup stacking and cards, various Redlands Unified School District Black Student Union members work together at the Soul Food Festival on Sept. 11. Students from Redlands, Redlands East Valley, Citrus Valley and Orangewood High Schools were present at the event.  (Photo courtesy of Quinkitha O’Neal)

Some of the businesses that were present during the festival were House of Purvian Cookie, Brooklyn’s Bakery Bites, Delviccio’s BBQ SmokeHouse, Asdelina’s Agua Frescas, and most popularly known, The WingMan. Citrus Valley, Redlands, Redlands East Valley and Orangewood High Schools all had BSU clubs present at the festival. 

The House of Peruvian Cookie at the Soul Food Festival was a popular choice among the many food booths, selling many desserts and cookies. The House of Peruvian Cookie is mainly located in Santa Clarita and is a cookie selling business based on Peruvian desserts. (Kevin Kambey/Ethic News photo)

Andrew Simmons, senior from Orangewood High School’s BSU, said, “ I really enjoyed seeing other schools’ Black Student Unions and helping all the different booths set up.”  

Jazz Daughtrey, a junior at Citrus Valley High School, attended the festival with the Citrus Valley’s BSU and said she loved “the soul food fest and seeing the Black culture.” 

“The food was amazing and I love how welcoming the other Redlands BSU clubs were,” said Daughtrey.

Another member of Citrus Valley’s BSU, sophomore Kalaya Felton, stated, “The shirts that people were selling were so beautiful and everything was so well put together. The soul food festival was just overall awesome.”

Various activities were available to participate in during the festival. These activities included spades and dominos contests, music, and food competitions. The food competition consists of three different categories: best main dish, best side dish, and best dessert. 

The award for best main dish was given to The WingMan with his lemon pepper wings, the winner for best side dish was Papa’s BBQ for their mac n cheese, and lastly the winner for best dessert was Still Standn Barbq with their famous banana pudding. 

The winners of the competition were awarded a certificate of appreciation as well as an additional prize. Spades and dominos winners were awarded a customized domino or card set. 

While the judges were tasting food from all the different food competition competitors, Kologbo Daughtrey gave a live performance on his soprano saxophone. He played a variety of songs including “Lovely Day” by Bill Withers. 

The Soul Food Festival had a mission of bringing the Black community and all people in Redlands together to bond and unite as one. 

Redlands citizen Kaylee Doll, junior at Citrus Valley, stated, “I think the Soul Food Festival was really a pure, safe, and fun environment and it was a great way to spend my Sunday afternoon.” 

News brief: Orangewood High School hosts first Black Student Union meeting of the year

By DIAMOND STONE

Orangewood High School hosted their first Black Student Union meeting this year on Aug.31 at lunch.  

The staff who attended the meeting were Orangewood AVID Coordinator and teacher LouAnn Perry, Family and Community Liaison and BSU advisor LaRena Garcia and Orangewood teacher and BSU advisor Vanessa Aranda.  

There were around 35 students and pizza was provided for all the kids that attended.

“The meeting was an introduction about BSU and it was also enjoyable and entertaining,” said Orangewood senior Blessen Thomas. 

At the meeting they talked about upcoming events like the Soul Food Fest on Sept. 11 at Ed Hales Park and the Historical Black College and University Fair.

“This was a good time and it was for students who wanted to join BSU. It’s a new club at Orangewood,” said Orangewood senior Anniyah Allison.

20 Questions with Orangewood High School’s English teacher Mrs. Lott

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

Kimberly Lott is an English teacher at Orangewood High School who is always welcoming to her students. She is known as someone who is real and honest with her students, in a way that is inspiring because she always stands in what she believes. She is unapologetically herself in the best way. Her efforts for students that are struggling don’t go unnoticed.

Q: What is your position or title? Pronouns? 

Kimberly Lott: English Teacher; she/her

Q: What are some of the classes you teach or main responsibilities with this position? 

Lott: I teach English 11 and English 12 as well as Advisory this year.  I have taught all four grades of English since I have been at OHS.  I have also taught English at the three middle school levels.  My favorite is English 12.How long have you worked in education? 24 yearsHave you held any jobs outside of education? Before I started teaching,  I worked as a teller at Bank of America; I also worked at Little Red School House which used to sell teacher supplies and a daycare with infants. I started teaching in 1998 at 23 years old.

Q: What led you to the position you are in today?  

Lott: A good friend taught at OHS and she convinced me to transfer over here.  She has since retired.

Q: What is one of your favorite parts of your job? 

Lott: My students.

Q: What is a challenging part of your job? 

Lott: My students. 🙂

Q: What is something others may not understand or know about who you are or what you do?

Lott: Students say I always look depressed, but I’m not.  That was the one good thing about masks; no one could tell if I was or wasn’t smiling under it.

Q: Who were early influences for you?

Lott: In high school, I was a TA in the library.  I got put in there because I was having a conflict with one of my teachers and that was the only place the counselor would move me.  I was so upset that I begged my parents to tell the counselor no and make her put me in another class because the librarian was so mean, but my parents said no.  It turned out to be the best part of high school.  I clicked with the librarian and we stayed in contact until she passed away.  She came to my graduation party and wedding.  Mrs. Carver taught me a lot and she had my back when I had another conflict in my senior year.  She is the reason I would love to be a high school librarian.

Q: Where did you grow up? What was life like then and there?

Lott: I grew up in San Bernardino.  My dad was raised there.  It used to be such a nice city, but that is no longer the case.

Q: What were you like as a teenager? 

Lott: A pain.  My parents would definitely agree with that.

Q: Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?  

Lott: Mrs. Carver-the librarian at San Bernardino High School and Mr. Tetlock at Golden Valley Middle School.  Mr. Tetlock introduced me to the game of basketball.

Q: Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today? 

Lott: I look back over my teaching career and I think how strict I was when I first started because I thought that was how I was supposed to teach.  I wasn’t flexible at all.  I have learned so much since coming to OHS that has impacted my teaching style.  I have learned respect goes both way. Sometimes the lesson just isn’t working and that is ok. You’re only as good as your word. The connection you make with your students is worth so much more than a grade. My students are worth fighting for.

Q: What advice would you give your teenage-self? 

Keep your mouth shut.  Once you say something, you can’t get it back.  And thank goodness there was no social media back then.

Q: Do you like to travel and What notable places have you visited? 

Lott: I have been to Mexico and Canada.  I have been to multiple states during my life.

Q: What music do you like?  

Lott: Country and early rap

Q: Would you be willing to share a little about your family and/or pets? 

Lott: I have two kids.  Emily is 21 and Justin is 18.  Both are currently in college.  My husband and I have been married for 24 years, but I have known him since I was a teenager.  He used to ride his bike down my street to visit his girlfriend and we became friends.  I have two dogs I adore–Rufus and Avery and a cat, Shadow, who doesn’t like me and that is just fine with me.

Q: Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share? What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

Lott: I enjoy camping, but haven’t done it in a long time.  I won’t camp in a tent and I don’t have an RV so that rarely happens.

Lott: What is a goal you have? 

Lott: I would really like to be a librarian at a high school or middle school.  It is scary to me because I have never tried that and, in the back of my head, I wonder what would I do if I did not like it and I couldn’t come back to OHS.

Opinion: Welcome students by normalizing pronoun usage and encouraging attendance

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

A goal at Orangewood High School will always be to help students feel welcomed in their learning environment. 

Normalize pronoun usage

A common issue that is experienced is uncomfortable pronoun usage or reference. 

People attach their identity to how they are referenced whether it’s he/she/they/them. After speaking and taking personal experiences from students that are a part of the LGBTQ+ community on campus, I feel it’s important to bring awareness for those that feel left out of everyday society during the school day, simply because others are uncomfortable with using a specific reference that applies to their gender identity.

A solution to this would be teachers having a brief lesson on the importance of pronouns even for heterosexual people, and get students comfortable with each reference. Many people use pronouns and ask people to use their pronouns because they want society to respect their identity.  Blogs, like Prospect, give personal reasons on why pronouns are important.

Encourage school attendance

After speaking to students on campus, being in the time frame during the year where absences are at a peak, I’d like to share helpful opinions on what would motivate students to come to school. 

Some students, like Orangewood Senior Thomas Vasquez, agree that they would be more motivated to attend if school lunch was better in quality and different each week.

Senior Sidney Hammons also mentioned more activities on campus, like movie nights or spring festivals. 

A more realistic and easier alternative to those activities that was recommended would be more interactive lesson plans like games that involve the lesson or subject being studied.
Tracking students’ absences and approaching them to check if they have a personal issue at home is helpful, according to companies like Creatix Campus. Sometimes asking them shows that someone cares and notices, which could mean more to a student if it was staff that asked.

Featured image was created by AVA LARSEN using canva.com

Opinion: Careless gun policies cost lives

By ORLANDO CEPEDA

Guns are no doubt cherished by many Americans, whether they are used for recreational uses such as shooting in the range, practicing accuracy or hunting. But others have different views on guns, and they have good reasons to view guns in a negative manner due to the tragedies guns have caused. But all in all, guns should only serve one purpose and that’s self defense. 

A gun, considering its potential to cause lethal trauma, should not be looked at lightly by America. Guns should overall be harder to obtain all around America equally, as they are able to take someone’s life in a flash. Guns should not be obtained easier in some states compared to others as it creates an inequality. 

The differences between the two political parties have caused the parties to oppose one another’s beliefs in political views, such as gun control. With the two parties opposing each other’s gun control beliefs, neither parties stop to think about the effects their decisions might cause Americans. The parties who are mainly in charge of democracy should not be so careless on crucial laws like gun control. Both parties need to wake up and realize that their decisions impact America, whether it’s positive or negative. They need to think outside the box. If they truly cared about Americans, they would put their differences aside and agree on a safer alternative rather than completely opposing the other party.  In other words, don’t oppose something that could greatly affect America; elaborate and discuss how both parties could modify their beliefs and agree on something. 

Now let’s say the Republicans and Democrats continue to act with the same beliefs, in terms of Americans’ safety, in that case heavily arming public places such as schools, malls, and supermarkets would decrease mass shootings or decrease the likelihood of these tragedies occurring. If guns are so easy to obtain, then why don’t places that have been susceptible to shootings use guns in defense? A mentally unstable 18-year-old is able to acquire a gun, but schools, while still being frequently targeted by shootings, do not arm themselves as they should.

With the frequent shootings that have occurred, America has gotten to the point where it’s “better safe than sorry,” and since anything can happen, why not prepare for the unexpected? It could save countless lives.

America should have wisened up the moment the first school shooting ever happened, but hasn’t yet learned from those past tragedies. American children should never have to go to school in fear that it might be their last school day ever.

20 Questions with Orangewood High School’s all-sport coach and teacher Mark Perkins

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

Many students have had Mark Perkins as a teacher or coach since they started at Orangewood High School and he’s always made them feel welcomed and acknowledged as students. He also motivates students to finish school and aim for success. Perkins is a favorite teacher for many students and plays a role as a model teacher at Orangewood.

Perkins, who is physical education teacher, coach of all four sports and athletic director at Orangewood, answers twenty questions about himself.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the Orangewood soccer team. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What is your position or title? Pronouns?

Mark Perkins: He, him and Mr.

Education

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, looks on as the soccer team practices at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What are some of the classes you teach or main responsibilities with this position?

Perkins: Athletics Director, Coach, PE teacher

Q: How long have you worked in education?

Perkins: 28 years

Q: Have you held any jobs outside of education?

Perkins: Not really, I have always been a teacher.

Q: What led you to the position you are in today?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a PE teacher, this was the spark that got me thinking about teaching P.E.

Q: What is one of your favorite parts of your job?

Perkins: Finding the students that are the diamonds but don’t know it yet!

Q: What is a challenging part of your job?

Perkins: The drama that the students have. It is hard to deal with every situation perfectly and drama complicates that.

Q: What is something others may not understand or know about who you are or what you do?

Perkins: I push students to be successful and sometimes that is misunderstood.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the boys and girls soccer teams at Orangewood. Perkins coaches all sports at Orangewood: basketball, soccer, volley ball and softball. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Growing up and Early Influences

Q: Where did you grow up? What was life like then and there?

Perkins: Ontario Canada is where I grew up. It is very green there and not very many people live there compared to the USA. So we have lots of country around us.

Q: What were you like as a teenager?

Perkins: I was really into sports and exercise, surprise surprise. 

Q: Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a P.E. teacher. When I was in the 8th grade I found out that in college you could go to school and be a P.E. teacher. I had no idea before that P.E. was a college degree.

Q: Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today?

Perkins: In college I took a job fishing in Alaska. My boat sank and I floated around in the ocean for seven hours until someone found my group.

Q: What advice would you give your teenage-self?

Perkins: I would tell me to not be afraid to share your emotions with the person you trust the most in life.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, stands by the field before a soccer match at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Mr. Perkins Today

Q: Do you like to travel? What notable places have you visited?

Perkins: I do like to travel. France, Switzerland, Germany, Italy are places in Europe I have visited.

Q: Which languages do you speak?

Perkins: I only speak English.

Q: What music do you like and do you play any instruments?

Perkins: 80’s Rock and when I was in high school I played the saxophone.

Q: Would you be willing to share a little about your family and/or pets?

Perkins: I have been married for 31 years and have two daughters, [ages] 21 and 24. Pets include two dogs, one Chihuahua mix — wife’s dog — and a purebred Dutch Shepherd — my dog.

Q: Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share?

Perkins: I love computers. I know how to use both PC and Mac computers. In addition to weight lifting, I also enjoy biking and the beach.

Q: What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

Perkins: I enjoy going to church, the beach, movies and hanging out with my friends.

Q: What is a goal you have?

Perkins: I want to travel more. Once my kids have both graduated from college, my wife and I want to see more countries of the world.

Review: “Wake Me When I’m Free” multimedia exhibit explores Tupac’s life beyond rap

By KAELEE CONTRERAS 

Located in Los Angeles, California, the Tupac museum experience, “Wake Me When I’m Free,” is a tribute to the late rapper Tupac Shakur and the significance of his life. Not only is this museum filled with amazing visuals and exhibits, but it also shares many of Tupac’s poems, songs and his upbringing.

One of Tupac’s poems displayed in the entrance of the museum. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)


This museum was a listening experience and required a headset to listen to Tupac’s music, his interviews, events that took place in his life, and much more. Simply aim the remote at a small sensor and listen to the audio designated with the exhibit.

An example of the remote is displayed in the image on the right. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)

As visitors walk through the museum and view these stunning exhibits, they are able to listen to the meaning and background story to each section and also get to take time for photo opportunities. One of my favorite visuals is the painting of Tupac as seen in the middle image above. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)

Tupac’s music, poetry and life had a very big impact on the world and has inspired millions of people to express themselves and pursue their dreams. He was a positive role model for people and was a very talented and influential artist. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)

One room of the exhibit was filled with a rose scent and displayed falling petals along with with an excerpt from a poem written by Tupac. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)

Tupac Shakur was widely known for being one of the best-selling music artists and sold more than 75 million records worldwide. What a majority of people don’t know about Tupac is how he began his music career as a rebel with a cause to fight for injustices endured by people of color. His music brought awareness to injustices, gun control, equality, social injustices, immoral acts and many other world issues. Due to his gangsta rap music aesthetic, a majority of people misunderstood what he stood for and saw him as a bad influence and a nusiance for society and youth.

Growing up, Tupac lived with his mother and his sister and lived a very difficult childhood. His mother, Afeni Shakur, was an American political activist and a previous member of the Black Panther party. Due to being charged with drug possession, Afeni was arrested and pregnant with Tupac while imprisoned. 

Tupac’s childhood included a lot of literature, and also him getting into trouble and involved with the company of criminals. He was exposed to violence at a very young age.

The young artist began rapping at the age of 14 and started making music to project his political view and fight against racial injustices poetically.

Tupac’s music career took off after he studied poetry, theater and music in high school and soon after became a roadie and backup dancer for the rap group Digital Underground in 1990. The growth of his music career and talent was very significant and his legacy still lives  on today even after his life was unjustly taken from him at such a young age.

The museum exhibit features information on Tupac’s mother, Afeni Shakur, and the Black Panther Party. (KAELEE CONTRERAS/ Ethic News photo)

The Decoders Podcast: Talking about the Tupac “Wake Me When I’m Free” Exhibit

Hosted by MARCO GARCIA GARCIA, SYDNEY HAMMONDS and CARLIE GONZALEZ

7 minute listen

Twenty students from Orangewood High School took a field trip to the Tupac Shakur “Wake Me When I’m Free” Exhibit in Los Angeles on April 27. Carlie Gonzalez, junior, asks Marco Garcia Garcia, junior, and Sydney Hammons, senior, about their experience visiting the exhibit and about Tupac overall.

News brief: Students invited to participate in Redlands Day of Community Service

By JASMINE ROSALES and SPENCER MOORE

All students in Redlands are invited to participate in the Redlands Day of Community Service on Saturday, May 7 from 8:30 am to noon.  

Steven Mapes, community member, invites everyone of all ages to come out and take part in the Redlands Day of community service. Mapes encourages students to wear their respective school colors to uplift others by seeing the youth serving in our community.

Digital image representing a day of community service created using Adobe Spark (MAURICIO PLIEGO/ Ethic image)

“One of the best things about the Community Day of Service is the way that it brings so many different people together,” said Judy Cannon, Director of Communications for the Redlands Stake of Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints. “We have all age groups and affiliations working alongside each other. It’s part of what makes Redlands so great.”

Students can obtain volunteer hours and take pride in their community by partaking in Redlands Day of Community Service.

“Some of our favorite volunteers are the students from our local high schools. They bring their youthful energy and a unique spirit of fun to the day,” said Cannon.

To volunteer visit Just Serve and search for “Redlands Day of Service May 7th, 2022.”  From there, choose a project to participate in.

The projects to choose from are: Heritage Park-Grounds Landscaping, State Street Planters, Redlands Sports Park Fence-Painting,  Ford Park Pond Stabilization and Gateway Ranch Cable Fencing.

For more information visit Just Serve: Annual Redlands Community Day of Service

Orangewood to implement new cell phone policy after Spring Break

By ANGELINE ASATOURIAN

At Orangewood High School, a new cell phone policy is starting on April 4. This policy was created due to cell phone abuse taking up class time. There will also be new consequences to go with it. 

The new policy states that starting on April 4, teachers may allow the use of cell phones or any electronic devices for a designated time “for a specific educational opportunity” or if there is an emergency, but there must be a verbal “explicit permission” before the electronic device is pulled out to be used. 

As with any rules, there are consequences for using these devices without the permission of school personnel. 

According to the policy, the first offense will result in the teacher issuing a verbal warning, with the parents or guardians being notified. 

The second offense will have the device confiscated for the rest of the school day, but will be “released to the student.” 

The third  offense will be having the device once again confiscated “for the remainder of the school day,” and parents or guardians will have to come to the Orangewood High School administration office and pick up the device. 

The policy states, “Orangewood High school is not responsible for stolen, lost, or damaged electronic devices.” 

Some students at Orangewood are not too pleased to be having this new policy and others say they understand the reason for it. 

Johnathan McGuire, a junior at Orangewood said, “I think they should change it, not like get rid of it, but revise it.” 

Monica Penunuri, a sophomore at Orangewood, states “I don’t like it, but I get it.” 

Students can attend School Site Council meetings and discuss their concerns with the staff. 

Opinion: Students need a weekly mental health break

By MEL MAGANA FRANCO

School is draining. Any student can agree, some more than others. 

“It’s draining because you wake up in the morning everyday and go to school for how many hours, six to seven,” says Niamonie Calloway, junior at Orangewood High School.

Students work, deal with family issues and some play sports. A break is well deserved. It would help students stay in a more calm state of mind. 

Students are the new generation coming up. It’s a lot of pressure on adults, of course, to make sure we are great individuals. But students, as kids and teens, we feel pressure. We feel like we have to meet everyone’s expectations and we become stressed. Everything is new to us.

We deserve at least one mental break weekly from all the thinking and the expectations and all of the worry.

Research shows that academic stress leads to less well-being and an increased likelihood of developing anxiety or depression. Students who have academic stress tend to do poorly in school. This mental health day will be a good thing for students’ future and mental health.

Having a mental health day off will encourage students to come to school when there is school. Students don’t come to school because they are drained or have higher priorities to deal with. With a mental break day, they will wait just for that day to come so they can get it out of the way. If you look at attendance around scheduled breaks, like Spring Break, the week before and after students are more likely to attend because they know they have that break. When there is school for days and weeks on end, students feel like there isn’t a break so they start to miss school. With scheduled mental break days, students will be more encouraged to show up to school.

It is true that some students may take advantage of this. Yes, some students may still not show up on scheduled school days. The school can make a rule that if they miss school without an actual good excuse, they can’t take the mental health day because it will be replaced with a make-up day. A few teachers on a rotating basis will be on campus on these mental health days for those students who need to make up missing work from an unexcused absence.  Those who showed up during scheduled school days should get the mental health break.

Students not only need a break, but would benefit from a mental health day off each week.

Opinion: Students should be able to excuse their own tardies

By ANDREW SIMMONS

There is an issue in high school attendance: tardiness.

There are many reasons students will not show up to school on time, as well as why students should be able to excuse their own tardies.

Mental health

Students may be dealing with mental health issues at home of which they don’t feel comfortable disclosing with school staff.

They could be living with depression and having trouble finding the motivation to get out of bed.

They could have obsessive-compulsive disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or other disorder, any of which can affect what time a student wakes up and what time they are ready for school in the morning.

Transportation

There is an assumption that all students have a way to get to school on time, but many students have compromised means of transportation and or live a further distance from the school than most students

A majority of high school students do not have their learner’s permit/driver’s license and many students or their families also do not have cars. A few examples of why students may not have access to a license or car include not being able to afford it, not being permitted by their guardian to do so, or simply being too afraid and not wanting to drive.

Some students have to bike safely up and down hills and through car-busy highways and roads, take city busses or even use costly ride-share apps.

Family size

Schools tend to neglect the fact that many students have many siblings, all in different age ranges, attending schools with different starts times, as well as possibly living in a one guardian household.

It would not be unreasonable to accept the verity of limited time in the morning. With this in mind, there is the challenge of trying to get every child in that family admitted to school on time every single day. No matter how prepared and organized a large family may be, there can always be unexpected obstacles like a traffic jam, or a type of mechanical error with their vehicle. 

Are students responsible and trustworthy enough to excuse their own tardies?

While it is understandable for teachers and staff to be skeptical about the very real possibility of students abusing the ability to call in sick, it is also important to note that the trust between students and teachers is generally strained due to prejudice from teachers towards students that are late or miss school frequently.

More than often, instead of trying to figure out why their students are missing school hours, the teacher will give the student unneeded and discouraging discipline. Students that get punished for something they had no control over may be less inclined to take responsibility the next time they could have control over their situation.

Many students, contrary to many adult beliefs, have very real and very complicated issues. Some of these problems, students might not be willing to share with teachers, especially in front of their peers during class time, which is more than often the time and place teachers choose to confront late students. This is a very disconcerting and uncomfortable situation that is far too familiar to many young adults in highs school. One could argue that a more appropriate time and setting to address the tardines of a student would be after class when the student is no longer occupied or in the presence of an audience of their peers.

Teachers may find that in listening to their students, they will also find understanding. Sympathy for students can go a very long way, and they may be less inclined to lie about their whereabouts, or wander the school halls with meandering minds.

The denigration of students’ personal issues is a disease among schools. The allowance of young adults to be trusted and involved with the responsibility of attendance issues may lead to a more adamant will to attend school and attend on time, of course keeping the issue of transportation in mind.

Ultimately, trusting the judgment of high school students for calling in to excuse missing class time in advance could gradually diminish tardiness. Allowing students the responsibility to excuse their own tardies may motivate an initiative in students to protect that responsibility by not abusing it.

Opinion: Students can help stop the spread of bullying

By ANGELINE ASATOURIAN

Content warning: This article mentions teen suicide.

“No one heals himself by wounding another.” -St. Ambrose

Hand drawn and colored image of how a student feels when being bullied. (AYEISHA FORDHAM/ Ethic News art)

Bullying is a serious problem not only across the United States, but also in communities that we live and go to school in. There are a lot of ways that students can prevent and help a victim of bullying, from just thinking before you post or speak to seeking resources or help from an adult.

There are many different effects of bullying, from distractions to tragedies. Students should not have to be worrying about what other people think about what they wear, who they like or how they look. Bullying can cause a lot of chaos, drama, and lead to fights in school, when school should be about having fun while getting an education. 

In the worst cases, bullying can lead to suicide. Bullying is the leading cause of suicide in the United States for the ages of 11-17, according to Americashealthrankings.org. It is a huge problem across the United States. According to research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “In the past decade, headlines reporting the tragic stories of a young person’s suicide death linked in some way to bullying (physical, verbal, or online) have become regrettably common.” 

Students should try to help anyone who is being bullied. Words and actions can help prevent it from continuing or getting worse. 

Actions you can take if you or someone you know is being bullied:

If you see something, say something 

If you see someone being made fun of, you should get an adult involved to stop the process. 

If you are being bullied, tell a trusted adult 

If feel you are being made fun of in a way that you makes you uncomfortable or you are afraid for your safety you could go to the office or the adult you trust the most. 

Image created using Canva. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News image)

Questions to ask yourself if you or someone you know is being bullied:

How can I help? 

Who is someone I can trust to assist? 

What could be the outcome if no one says anything? 

Actions you can take to prevent or help stop the spread of bullying:

Don’t start or continue rumors about others

Even if you did not start the rumor, do not continue it. Whether or not you believe that the rumors are true, do not continue them.  

On social media, think before you post 

Social media has been being used for many things and one can include bullying. Before you press that post button, think about the effects of what you are posting. 

Image created using Canva. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News image)

Questions to ask yourself when speaking or posting about others: 

Is it true? 

Is it kind? 

Is it directed against someone?

Everyone can play a role in helping their families, friends and peers so students can get an education safely without the acts of bullying on campus. 

More resources that can help:

For information on who to contact and how to approach a bullying situation: 

https://www.stopbullying.gov/resources/get-help-now

For cyberbullying resources go to:

https://internetsafety101.org/cyberbullyingresources

More resources for educators and families created for helping children being bullied: 

For Redlands Unified School District bullying resources: 

https://www.redlandsusd.net/Page/10701

Orangewood staff share Valentine’s Day memories

By ANGELINE ASATOURIAN

We asked five staff members at Orangewood High School what their most memorable Valentine’s Day has been. 

Karen Wilson is an OHS government teacher and coordinator for the Orientation Assessment Study Skills Insight Success program, better known by OHS students and staff as OASIS. Wilson said, ”My best V-day memory was finding out I was pregnant with my first baby in 2000.”

Bob Blank, OHS English teacher, shared that his first Valentine’s Day being married was the best. Unfortunately, his wife was sick and they did not have a lot of money. So being a newly-wed husband, he went out and bought her a big red teddy bear. She was very surprised and 20 years later, she still has it. 

Hand-drawn and colored Valentine’s cards. (AYEISHA FORDHAM and EMILEE WALTERS COOK/ Ethic News art)

Don’t forget to get Lou Ann Perry a Valentine’s Day card. Perry is the OHS English teacher and coordinator for the Advancement Via Individual Determination program. When she was in the second grade, Perry had filled out all of her Valentine’s cards to pass out to her classmates the night before and went to bed excited for the next day to come. Unfortunately for her, she woke up with the mumps, and could not go to school for a week. Perry never got her Valentine’s cards and candy from second grade. This “Single’s Awareness Day,” as Perry likes to call it, she would like to share the late great cartoonist Charles Shchult’z words, “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” 

Carli Norris, OHS principal, said that when she was in the third grade, her class had made the little Valentine envelopes and put them on their desks. She remembers taking them home after receiving them from her friends and classmates to open them. The candy that came with them was a plus.

Tito Costakes, OHS independent studies teacher, on the other hand, doesn’t really have any good or bad memories of Valentine’s Day. He just misses the days where he was single, playing golf and not having to spend a lot of money on a fancy dinner and fancy presents. 

Thank you to all the teachers and staff members for sharing their memories and stories.

Redlands School District gives students free COVID tests as cases rise

As a result of the surge of COVID-19 cases, RUSD schools distributed these rapid antigen tests to students today. (BELLA ESPINOZA/Ethic News)  

By ETHIC NEWS STAFF

The Redlands Unified School District distributed iHealth COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test at-home self-test kits for all RUSD students on Jan. 12. Each student was to receive a kit that contained two tests. 

Teachers and staff were given specific instructions as to how to distribute the tests and to give only one test kit per student. If a student was absent, teachers were to return their kit to the front office. 

Students were informed that there was only one test kit per student. Therefore if they lost or destroyed theirs, it would not be replaced. They were told to not self administer the test during school, but rather when they arrived home.  

Citrus Valley High School received their COVID test kits during second period. An announcement was made before teachers handed out one to each student.

Redlands High School students received their test kits during fourth period. 

Redlands East Valley High School students received their test during their English class. REV students got their tests during different periods.

Orangewood High School students received their COVID tests during their second period advisory class. 

On Jan. 12, an email was sent out to families of the RUSD by Redlands Schools Districts stating, “The test kits were provided for all students in the state of California by Governor Newsom and the California Department of Public Health.”

These tests would normally be $19.80 according to the iHealth website, but were provided for free to all RUSD students.   

Number of confirmed COVID cases in the Redlands Unified School District’s high schools in the last 14 days from Jan. 12, 2021. (Redlands Unified School District Covid Dashboard https://www.redlandsusd.net/Page/18775

Q & A: Sheriff Grant inspires Orangewood students, speaks from experience

By DEBBIE DIAZ

Photos by ALEXIS GARCIA

Officer Otis Grant, From the Riverside Sheriff’s Department, came to speak with students from Kimberly Lott’s classroom at Orangewood High School on Oct. 5. 

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department speaks to the Orangewood High School class of Kimberly Lott, Language Arts teacher, on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DEBBIE DIAZ: Okay, This is Officer Grant, Sheriff’s Department Riverside, right? Okay, and your first question, can you describe a very distressing situation in which you remained calm and collected?


OFFICER OTIS GRANT:  I’ll probably have to say, sometimes when you come across people with mental conditions, they don’t comprehend exactly what you’re trying to ask of them, so sometimes you have to slow things down and you have to really explain things to them thing to them, like you’re talking to a child. Sometimes you have to raise your voice at them to find a way to communicate with people; different people in different ways. Some people you have to be very calm and talk low too, and some people you gotta get into their head, you gotta find out what they’re thinking, and that’s why you have to just, you know, to get what we call compliance.

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department is interviewed by Orangewood High School senior and Ethic journalist, Debbie Diaz, on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DIAZ: Okay, and then you had said previously that you wanted to be a police officer since you were young — six years old. Did anyone influence you?

GRANT: So I grew up in San Bernardino, and I remember one day, my father and I were out in the backyard, and one of my father’s friend with a police officer, he came by the house. We were talking on the roadway and got a hot call and as we were talking, what they call a priority call comes out, and the police officer took off and he was running with his lights and sirens and everything. And at that moment, I remember thinking, “Wow, that’s what I wanna do with my life. I know it.” It just hit me right then and there, I knew what I wanted to do in my life, and that was my defining moment. It was weird because I said I was five, six years old at that time. And fast forward, maybe 20 something years down the road, I went on a ride along with the San Bernardino Police Department, and I come across this guy and he doesn’t recognize… Because I was a lot older then, and I introduced myself to him and he was like, “You’re little Otis.” And I was like, “Yeah.” And I said, “Do you remember that day that you met me and my dad out in the backyard?” 

He was like, “I do remember that day.” He was like, “You were a little guy.” And I said, “Did you know that that encounter was the reason why I’m here today?” And he shook my hand and he hugged me. He was like, “Are you saying I did that for you?” And I was like, “That’s what you did for me,” and I was like, “I can’t thank you enough.” And it was a very proud moment in his career, but I know he never thought that he would have or someone like that, and it was that I got to meet the person who really opened my eyes to law enforcement.

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department answers student questions after speaking to an English class at Orangewood High School on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DIAZ: Right. Oh, that’s beautiful. Okay, now we’re gonna switch up to tobacco industry. Okay, how do you think your has affected students today… What’s that? The tobacco industry, how do you think it has affected students today?

GRANT: The tobacco industry has, it’s hurting kids because you have kids using these vape pens, you have kids that are putting chemicals in their bodies that they don’t really… No one really knows exactly what’s in these things, and they’re making kids addicted. The kids are getting addicted to these things it’s messing with their mental health and that’s with them addicted physically.. You’re seeing he is… When I worked in Heritage High School, we were getting kids once or twice a day that we’re passing out or bring found unconscious, I should say, whether it be in classrooms, the bathrooms, the PE area, and we would ask them what was the last thing that you remember doing it was like, Oh, I was going to vape pen, and you’re taking something that was marijuana, and then you’re making into a chemical form… Well, no one knows what chemicals are being used to break down the THC level… The THC levels now, and I don’t really know what they are, but the THC levels now that they’re using in vape pens and marijuana these days are a lot higher than what it was in the 60s, in the 70s, and that’s what’s really affecting people.

Orangewood AVID students visit Whitewater Preserve 

By MYA TRUJILLO BRAND and AYEISHA FORDHAM

The Advancement Via Individual Determination students at Orangewood High School visited Whitewater Preserve  on Nov. 18 to educate themselves on local environments that aren’t often being spoken about.

The trip consisted of hiking, observing, and talking. Out of the 26 students that attended, they were separated into groups with a naturalist that led them around the preserve while listing many facts about Whitewater. 

OHS AVID teacher Lou Ann Perry said, “Perfect day away for students, peaceful and a great way to reconnect with our environment, no cell phone distraction, great to take a break away from stress.”

The students and even the chaperones expressed that they loved being there. The rangers were always at work and kept busy maintaining the grounds for visitors. The hiking was slightly fast paced, but very informative as to what students were looking at while they were walking. 

John Aidoo, an AVID senior at OHS, says, “It was a great scenery that was surrounded by positive people and was very educational.”

The area and land at Whitewater is unique in its entirety. The landscape was dry land, but makes a home for many animals and its environment where “the animals don’t depend on the rangers for survival,” says naturalist Jennifer Lopez.

Izaiah Ramos, a junior at OHS, says,  “The hike up the mountains was nice and felt good overlooking something that isn’t busy roads.”

According to the naturalist, Jennifer Lopez, this land is now dry and used to be filled with water. It is surrounded by mountains. (Mya Trujillo/ Ethic News photo)

Orangewood senior Alexis Garcia and AVID teacher Lou Ann Perry hike with the group of students on Nov. 18. Naturalist Jennifer Lopez spoke to the group about where the water flows in from and how it helps the animals in the area. (Mya Trujillo/ Ethic News photo)

This pond is home to unique wildlife. (Mya Trujillo/ Ethic News photo)

Towards the end of the field trip, naturalists spoke to AVID students and thanked them for coming. (Photo courtesy of Lou Ann Perry)

Lea este artículo en español aquí: https://ethic-news.org/2021/11/21/noticias-breves-estudiantes-de-orangewood-visitan-whitewater-preserve/

Redlands Superintendent Mauricio Arellano visits Orangewood High School

By DEBBIE DIAZ and JOSEPH PACHECO

Superintendent Mauricio Arellano came to Orangewood High School on Nov. 17 to speak to students and look at the new remodels in the classrooms.

“The purpose of coming was to meet the students, meet the staff, get to look at some of the instruction that’s happening,” said Arellano. “I wanted to look at some of the remodels, like the library, some of the science rooms are still kind of in process — it’s going to take a while. I hadn’t seen the new culinary kitchen, so there’s a lot of good — the PE room, so that was a big part of coming.”

Arellano was doing the visits with Susan Abt, president of the Redlands Teacher Association. This was their second visit after their visit to Redlands High School earlier in the week. 

Arellano said, “It’s not just me coming today, this is actually a collaborative schedule…so that people see us as a united force, that we’re here for kids and the staff and the principals.”

From left: Superintendent Mauricio Arellano, Orangewood High School seniors Debbie Diaz, Linayah Timmons and Joseph Pacheco and Redlands Teachers Association President Susan Abt. (Ethic News photo)

“I think it’s been very beneficial for everyone to see us together, working together as a team, instead of two different groups,” Arellano said.

Students in Kimberly Lott and Louise Gonzales’ classes made posters to make the superintendent feel welcome. 

Senior Victor Encarnacion Ruiz said of Arellano visiting his first period class, “He felt like a future self of us, looking down on us, and it felt like someone was saying, ‘Don’t worry’.”

When Arellano and Abt visited Gonzales’ Integrated I math class, Gonzalez said Arellano would ask students what they were doing. In Lou Ann Perry’s English 11 class, he asked students about their upcoming AVID field trip to Whitewater.

“I enjoyed asking a lot of the students as I walked through, you know, do they like the school, do they feel supported,” said Arellano, “and everyone — at least that I talked to — said they really enjoy the school and appreciate and feel like they’re getting support.”

“One kid told me that he was tired and yawned,” said Arellano. 

Arellano laughed and said, “That’s okay. I’ve had those days.”

Orangewood High School students in a Mathematics II class take notes on Nov. 17, 2021, while instructor Louise Gonzales explains out the new lesson they’re starting. (JOSEPH PACHECO/ Ethic News photo)

Orangewood High School teacher Matt Stewart works with a small group of students on Nov. 17, 2021. Stewart says, “We were discussing the Rube Goldberg contest — the upcoming rube Goldberg contest — where the final step is to open a book and so we were talking in class about how many different ways we can open a book with the machine.” (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News photo)

A new Culinary Arts kitchen, recently integrated into the Orangewood High School campus, is one of the new remodels of the school. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News photo)

3-D printers are some of the new equipment upgrades in Matt Stewart’s Career and Technical Education classroom at Orangewood High School. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News photo)

A remodeled Career Center was recently finished at Orangewood High School. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News photo)

Lea este artículo en español aquí: https://ethic-news.org/2021/11/20/el-superintendente-de-redlands-mauricio-arellano-visita-la-escuela-secundaria-orangewood/

Orangewood SkillsUSA chapter donates to Redlands Animal Shelter

By CELESTE LUJAN

Photos by ALEXIS GARCIA

Orangewood High School students from the local SkillsUSA chapter decided to do a toy drive for dogs and cats. They took a field trip to the animal shelter on Oct. 28 to drop off the donations and to experience visiting the animals at the shelter. 

According to the SkillsUSA California website, their goal is to ”empower people to become world class workers to become leaders and responsible American citizens to help the citizens improve the quality and life of our nation’s future skilled workforce.” 

The OHS Skills USA chapter got students to help donate items for the local Redlands Animal Shelter. Members shared their opinion on the experience at the animal shelter and what caught their eye. 

Photos above: The SkillsUSA chapter from Orangewood High School took a field trip to donate items to the Redlands Animal Shelter on Oct. 28. The students held an animal toy drive at school and walked to the shelter to donate the items. (Photos courtesy of Alexis Garcia)

“They have more pit bulls than any other animal. It sucks because pit bulls are always in the shelter,” said Isaiah Dennie, OHS SkillsUSA vice president. “A lot because people think they are ugly, but they are actually very beautiful and cool dogs.”  

Johnny Dominguez, OHS SkillsUSA treasurer, said, “I think this place needs more money to be treated a little better and wish the animals get treated a little better, but they look happy,” said Dominguez.

Lissette Atkinson, an officer at the Redlands Animal Shelter, shared about how she felt with OHS students being there and donating.

“It’s great I love having you students here and we appreciate it a lot and for you guys to come visit us means a lot,” said Atkinson.

“And we are glad to give you knowledge about what the animal control does and what the animal shelter does, because not a lot of people know and a lot of people think, ‘oh they are just dog catchers, they are just there to catch dogs and there to be mean.’ Absolutely not,” said Atkinson. “We are primarily educators and we care about the animals and we want to make sure we give you guys the proper tools to be a successful animal owner.” 

According to the Skills USA website, they are “a national non-profit organization, who is serving middle school, high school and college students. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce.” 

To learn more about California SkillsUSA visit https://www.skillsusaca.org/about

Photos: Dragons end softball season with 3 home runs against Birch

By DEBBIE DIAZ and JOSEPH PACHECO

Orangewood High School participated in their last softball game of the season on Oct. 13 against Birch High School, hitting three home runs and concluding their season with a win.

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez runs to first base versus Birch High School on Oct. 13. The OHS Dragons are coached by Mark Perkins. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic Photo)

Orangewood High School junior Jesse Navarro pitches to Birch High School on the Oct. 13 softball game. Navarro is the Dragons’ main softball pitcher. (DEBBIE DIAZ/Ethic photo)

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez prepares to bat versus Birch High School on Oct. 13. As as senior in the last game of the season, Gomez played her last softball game. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic photo)

Orangewood High School junior Alicia Zaragoza waits for the coach to announce safe or out on the Oct. 13 softball game versus Birch. “Zaragoza is our best first baseman,” says OHS senior Jocelyn Gomez. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News)

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez rounds first base in the Oct. 13 game versus Birch High School. As a senior in the last game of the season, this is the last softball game Gomez plays for the Dragons. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News)

School Talks podcast, ep.1: Talking with an Orangewood teacher about 9/11

Hosted by MIA MEDINA and ZNIA SEWARD

Transcript

ZNIA SEWARD: Hey this is Znia.

MIA MEDINA:  This is Mia. 

SEWARD:  We’re school talks with Orangewood High School and we were interviewing Ms.Sachs about the 9/11 and how she felt about it. Enjoy. 

MEDINA:  Okay so we’re just  going to ask you some questions about 9/11. So the first one is What were you feeling at that moment when you found out that the planes crashed? 

SEWARD: As you were watching it .

STEPHANIE SACHS: Disbelief and horror.

Pause 

SEWARD: And if you explain it was everything moving quickly or slow did it feel like it was real? 

SACHS:  It was surreal nothing like that had ever happened and history and truly people could not believe what they were seeing.

MEDINA: Okay and our next question is: At that moment what were you doing like then?

SACHS: I was getting ready, my whole family was getting ready. All my kids had to go to school, so we were watching. We had on a news channel and my one daughter screamed, “Mom come see this,” and then we just stood there transfixed watching.

MEDINA: Okay, so since 9/11 are there some things from that day that have stuck with you forever or anything? 

SACHS: To see the buildings in New York collapse where I had been; to see them turn to dust and see the rubble. I will never forget the look on peoples faces as they were covered in just sut 

from all the ashes.

MIA: Yeah.

SACHS: Never forget that. 

MIA: Was it traumatizing to just kind of sit there and watch it all happening and you have no way of doing anything at that moment?

SACHS: Absolutely. For one thing, we didn’t know what was going on. The first plane hit; we thought it was an accident. Oh my gosh. What happened that a plane could go so far off course? And then when the second building was hit, we realized it was intentional and then we heard that there was another plane in Pennsylvania and there was another plane in Washington, DC.

SEWARD: Did you know anybody affected by this traumatizing event?

SACHS: I did not know anyone who was there personally that day. Life has definitely changed for those of us who remember 20 years ago. 

SEWARD:  Do you feel like the event could have been preventable in any type of way? 

SACHS:  No. Not at that point in time because our country is open to all people from all over the world, right? So we were not suspicious that anybody hated us so much that they would try to do something as horrific as that. 

SEWARD: Do you, when I say preventable, I mean so much preventable such as in like the before the plane as the plane is getting hijacked do you feel that the captain or anyone else like that could have possibly called out or anyone in the building could have evacuated beforehand? 

SACHS: You know, no. Cause people just didn’t know what was going on now as far as in Pennsylvania when the people on board that plane realized that. That plane was actually — they think — going to a target in Washington, DC, that they actually brought it down. They sacrificed  their own lives to try to storm the cabin to prevent them from flying into, you know, another building so they did take action but as far as, you know, in the buildings, the united nation those twin towers were huge. I mean, you know, what they did was hit just right in the middle, right where they knew the beams would be able  to melt which would then cause everything to come down. It’s really amazing, not amazing, I mean horrifying, how that one day changed and there was no like now, looking at certain groups of people — I’m trying to decide how to say that — looking at certain groups of people with suspicion now because of the ethnicity of the people who carried out those actions.

SEWARD: After the 9/11 effects do you feel that the people of the United States, in general, around the world the way their views looked at you know these type of people and how they associated this entire specific race to all terrorisim — do you feel that, that was so much of — how do I say this — kind of like a flight or fight type response to everything? Because of the traumatizing events that took place, or do you feel that people were being cruel?

SACHS: Everybody wanted an outlet for something. Everybody wanted to be able to blame somebody and of course it’s wrong to identify a certain group of people. There’s good and bad people in all the people of the world, but it was easier for people I think to get over the pain and the shock of what happened to focus on certain groups of people.  

SEWARD: Do you personally feel like you yourself has viewed anyone differently or looked at  any type of anything differently: planes, firemen, or people just in general? 

SACHS: I think the first responders became more recognized as heroes, and it was very obvious that they put their lives on the line. So many of them died. Those that didn’t die right then often suffered tremendous respiratory damage. 

SEWARD: Cause of the fire. 

Ms.Sachs: Cause of breathing in all, we didn’t know all the chemicals that were in the building  composition that you know they were subjected to breathing. Personally, it’s hard objectifying certain people. I was raised that with everybody you don’t look at race, religion, creed.   

SEWARD: People are people. 

SACHS: People are people, so I was fortunate being raised that way. 

SEWARD: If you can tell our generation one thing to somehow in the future, look at signs or take action about anything you know, what would you tell us, or even just general information that this generation should know, what would you tell us?

SACHS: To be aware. Just like we say, “If you see something, say something,” I think that applies all around. You know in looking back, why were those people taking plane lessons? You know, but it’s just you have to be aware of everything around you. You can’t just assume something. Just be aware and, you know, it doesn’t mean be critical. It just means be aware. Be aware and don’t be afraid. 

SEWARD: Do you feel that any these you know this specific suspects and people involved in this do you believe that their families are traumatized or you know if they feel more like of a outcast or anything like that because of something their family members did? 

SACHS: Um Probably but if we’re talking about actually what’s going on right now is one of the they think masterminds of 9/11 is actually on trial right now in Guantanamo, um the others died  most of the other people died um and in the culture they live in their probably celebrated because they got over on you know they considered the United States evil so. 

SEWARD: And how do you feel we as United States people and you know how do you feel we can make these other countries all included more comfortable with the thought were just like them? You know, we’re not too — most of us aren’t –that privileged. Most of us, we have our own struggles and problems. So how do you feel we as this generation and the further generations and even past generations could possibly change how we react and treat these other countries?

SACHS: You know, in realizing that we’re no better and no worse. The United States has some things that they should not be proud of over the years. Slavery was one thing, right? How could we have thought that it was right to treat people as objects? And there have been other things. So if we accept that, we might have certain things that we can share and give to other countries that would help them. We, likewise, have to believe that they can also share and improve our country as well. 

Another random silence 

SEWARD: Um and also with the events going on around that area, now how do you feel that this can also be prevented? If they just so might take action, what can we do as people to prepare ourselves for the absolute worst.? 

SACHS: You can’t, you really can’t. Again just be aware of things going on around you. You know when we talk about like earthquake preparedness here in california, okay we can have the food and have the water and blankets the batteries all those things. 

SEWARD: But nothing ever prepares you to lose things.To lose all of what you have.  

SACHS:  And you can’t live being afraid of everyday so you can just prepare yourself as best you can.  

Audio: 20 years after 9/11 Orangewood teachers recall shock and disbelief

By DEBBIE DIAZ, JOSEPH PACHECO and APRIL CABRERA

Three teachers at Orangewood High School recall when they first heard about the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks: Mark Perkins, physical education teacher, Norma Beckwith, social studies teacher and Louise Gonzales, mathematics teacher.


Mark Perkins, P.E. teacher

Audio recording of interview on Sept. 10, 2021 with Mark Perkins, physical education teacher at Orangewood High School, on what he remembers about the 2001 attacks on the twin towers. Perkins recalls shock.

DEBBIE DIAZ: What were you doing on the day the twin towers were hit?

MARK PERKINS: I didn’t find out about the twin towers until I woke up that morning and then — I don’t know how I knew it was on the news — but it was on the news. Oh, I know how I knew it was one the news. I had a cousin, my wife’s first cousin, he was doing his residency at the closest hospital to where the twin towers fell. When they were bringing victims in, they were bringing them to his hospital. So he called us just to let us know how he was okay. So that’s how I found out that morning about the twin towers. Does that answer your question?

DIAZ: Yes. What was your reaction when you first found out?

PERKINS: I would say the biggest reaction is shock. I would say, you know, my wife grew in a country, she was born in Africa, she grew up in a country where there was war and that kind of — the kind of behavior that happened in the U.S. on that day was like what she remembered happening in the country that she grew up in Malawi in Africa. And nothing like that had ever been seen before in America. So it was just shock the fact that bad guys could come in and do that to us, and we just let it happen.

PACHECO: No one have responsibility.

DIAZ: Do you know anyone that was affected physically by the attack?

PERKINS: Like I mentioned earlier, my cousin was in his second year of residency at one of the hospitals, so he got to see a lot of the victims that were brought in. So I can’t say that specifically victims, but it was interesting hearing. I mean he could look out his hospital window, and he could see the towers smoking and on fire. You know, when they collapsed, he was a first hand witness to that kind of a thing. So it was interesting to hear from his perspective.


Norma Beckwith, history teacher

Audio recording of interview on Sept. 10, 2021 with Norma Beckwith, social studies teacher at Orangewood High School, on what she remembers about the 2001 attacks on the twin towers. Beckwith recalls disbelief.

DIAZ: What were you doing on the day the twin towers were hit?

NORMA BECKWITH: Getting ready to go to work, to teach at Clement Middle School.

DIAZ: What was your reaction when you found out?

BECKWITH: Disbelief initially. You know, when the first plane hit, it was like “What is going on?” But when the second one hit, I  knew we were under attack. And then fear. Fear.

DIAZ: Do you know someone that was affected physically by the attack?

BECKWITH: No, surprisingly on the West coast I knew absolutely no one. I mean, I knew of people, friends who knew people, but I was not impacted personally — my family, my friends — but, just am forever saddened about 3,000 plus lives that were lost.

DIAZ: Right, a tragedy, right.

PACHECO: Do you believe in any conspiracies?

BECKWITH: I absolutely do not believe in conspiracy theories. We were attacked by the terrorists, Al Queda. There is no conspiracy. They’re out to ruin our way of life.


Louise Gonzales, math teacher

Audio recording of interview on Sept. 10, 2021 with Louise Gonzales, mathematics teacher at Orangewood High School, on what she remembers about the 2001 attacks on the twin towers. Gonzales recalls shock.

DIAZ: What were you doing on the day the twin towers were hit?

LOUISE GONZALES: I had just gotten to my classroom, getting ready to teach for the day.

DIAZ: And what was your reaction when you found out?

GONZALES: Shock. Shock. I didn’t really know what was going on.

DIAZ: What went through your head?

GONZALES: I just…shock. Like, “What’s going on?”

DIAZ: Do you know of someone who was affected physically by the attack?

GONZALES: No.

PACHECO: Do you believe in any conspiracies about the attack, like the government, or…?

GONZALES: No.

PACHECO: You just believe it was a terrorist attack?

GONZALES: Yea.

Lea este artículo en español aquí: https://ethic-news.org/2021/09/22/20-anos-pasado-orangewood-maestros-recuerda-memorias-de-la-sept-11-ataques/

Facebook “Adopt a Redlands Senior” group recognizes high school seniors with gifts

Originally published in La Plaza Press

By MIA ARANDA

No Homecoming or Prom. No school rallies. No fall Friday night football games. No concerts, plays, or sporting events. No painting student parking spots. No college acceptance celebration days. No paper toss. No end-of-the-year trip to an amusement park. It may be possible that seniors not experience an in-person graduation this year.

Class of 2021 high school seniors are facing the inevitable loss of their last year of high school. For them, this year is supposed to be remembered as a once-in-a-lifetime experience to cherish moments with friends and classmates before they all take on different paths following graduation. However, given the different circumstances imposed by the pandemic, seniors are forced to trudge through the year via distance learning without the in-person connections formed or developed with friends and teachers. 

Redlands High School senior Linda Estrada said, “It impacts mental health because it is stressful to try to teach yourself a lesson you didn’t comprehend in class and when it comes up to that quiz or test you feel uneasy because you don’t know if you taught yourself the correct way to do it.”

To incite positivity for these high school seniors, Marci Atkins, mother of a senior at Redlands High School, started a Facebook group titled Adopt a Redlands Senior. This event is open to any seniors enrolled in RHS, Redlands East Valley, Citrus Valley, Orangewood, the Grove, and Redlands eAcademy. Parents of the class of 2021 seniors are encouraged to post about their seniors where they tell the group about them along with a photo. Anyone else is welcome to read their post and comment if they would like to “adopt” them. By doing so, they commit to compiling a goodie basket or gift bag to deliver to their adopted senior’s house. 

With more than 200 people in the group, seniors have received overwhelming support through the delivery of gifts from people they didn’t even know. 

“I was surprised and very thankful,” said CV senior Destiny Shaughnessy, who received a blanket, car freshener, candle, bracelet and some candy in her gift bag.

“I think this helps seniors because they have worked hard and struggled to get to graduation,” said CV senior Azul Amaro. “Every senior/student has obstacles not just in school but in life as well and I think that with a small/big gift it can make a senior’s day, week, or month better.”

Amaro received a gift basket with a large assortment of items: a sketchbook, some sketching pencils, some fuzzy blue socks, a mermaid reef candle, a 2021 magnetic calendar, a blue glittery scrunchie, some candy and a bath bomb.

Estrada said, “It gave me a boost of confidence knowing people see what we are going through as seniors.”

Redlands High School senior Laura Estrada with a gift basket on Nov. 14. Estrada received a makeup palette, gift cards to Starbucks and Taco Bell, some scrunchies, face masks, and nail polishes from Sergio Vazquez, parent of a Citrus Valley high school senior. (Courtesy of Laura Estrada)

Anyone wanting to adopt a senior can find all the information through Marci Atkin’s FaceBook group “Adopt a Redlands Senior.” Even small gestures, such as flowers, balloons, or a card, truly brighten up seniors’ days. All people are encouraged to participate and appreciated greatly for making this year’s seniors feel special given these unique circumstances. 

Redlands Unified School District plans to hold the multi-school Genesis dance

By EMILY WALOS

(infographic courtesy of Citrus Valley website)

On February 28, students of all grades from Citrus Valley High School, eAcademy, Grove High School, Orangewood High School, Redlands East Valley High School, Redlands High School and RISE Program will attend a multi-school, multi-stage dance called Genesis held at the Yucaipa Performing Arts Center.

The dance will not only include multiple dance floors with several DJs, but also activities such as rock climbing, karaoke, arcade games, human foosball, caricatures and a chill lounge that are all fully included with the ticket purchase. 

Genesis’s doors will open at 7 p.m. however lines are expected and the dance will conclude at 11 p.m.

Before purchasing a ticket, students must turn in an additional waiver with the standard dance permission slips. This waiver allows students to participate in the rock climbing activities. 

The dress code for the dance is casual attire, however the school dress code still applies. Students are encouraged to dress warmly or in layers as the event has activities both indoors and outdoors. 

Students will be able to enter the dance by showing their student ID at the entrance as it will serve as their ticket. Re-entry to the dance once outside the doors will not be permitted.

This event that includes all of the RUSD schools is traditionally held once a year. However, it was not held the previous 2018-2019 school year, therefore this 2019-2020 school year is the dance’s comeback year.

Opinion: Orangewood student makes a case for return of school buses

Graphic design created using ibisPaint X. (Mia Aranda/ Ethic Media)

By MALIK GAYNAIR

What keeps students motivated to get up and get ready for school? Maybe it’s friends, maybe it’s food, or maybe it’s educational excitement. But, amid all this motivation, some students still find reasons to not come to school.

As a model continuation school, Orangewood High School works to reignite students’ motivation to attend school again and catch up on work. However, a major impediment stands in the way: transportation. Many students are unable to secure regular transportation to home and from school.

Orangewood no longer offers school busing anymore. Why don’t we have it anymore, you say? Allegedly, budget cuts. No matter the reason, a bus system is crucial for student success.

Local city bus stops are often too far from most students’ houses, or too far from Orangewood in general. Despite this, most students still go the extra mile to take the public city bus and walk to school. This system puts a strain on regular and timely attendance, because students do not want to depend on unreliable public transportation wherein they run the risk of harassment by strangers on the city buses. 

Moreover, some students experience problems at home that may prevent them securing regular rides from family members. Occasionally, students’ parents can’t take them to school, because they have work. Additionally, when the our city experiences inclement weather, students are more inclined to stay home because they are faced with the following question: Why go to school if I don’t have a ride or don’t want to walk to school?

Orangewood’s goal should be to encourage students to attend school; it would be a good idea if the district gave the school its transportation back. At the end of the day, it should be about ensuring that students have what they need to be successful and giving them a better chance to graduate on time.

Opinion: AVID program makes a positive impact on Orangewood students

By MECCAYDA GREGARY

At such a small school like Orangewood High School, the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program has made a widespread, positive impact on students.

AVID is a college preparation program designed to provide students with the skills they need to be successful for college. AVID intends to support low-income, struggling students. The program teaches critical thinking, organization, teamwork, note-taking, and key writing skills.   

Orangewood High School AVID students play an interactive game that demonstrates the importance of teamwork and critical thinking in real-life settings. (Meccayda Gregary / Ethic News)

According to a statement released by AVID, 75 percent of participating students come from a low-economic status background while 80 percent are students from underrepresented demographics. Although students come increasingly varied backgrounds, they still outperform their peers across various subjects due to their AVID training.

Orangewood High School AVID students participate by learning about possible college opportunities at a college fair held in the Jerry Lewis Center. (Meccaryda Gregary/ Ethic News)

AVID helps struggling students by guiding them to a path to success with training in study and time management skills. According to an AVID statement, over 90 percent of participating student graduates attend college, and 89 percent of those students continue to attend college after two years. This goes to show the AVID program is effective in teaching students the skills they need to be successful in college and in daily life.  

The Orangewood High School AVID family poses for a photo together in front of their high school. (Meccadya Gregary / Ethic News)

Through the program, students are able to prepare for college, apply to the colleges that spark their interest, visit countless campuses, receive scholarships and engage with alumni. Otherwise, students may not have had similar opportunities or encouragement to even apply, much less pursue higher education. At Orangewood, involvement in AVID has had countless benefits. As a participating senior, I have applied to college, received acceptances from some universities and junior colleges, and obtained pending scholarships.

Students learn to appreciate and adapt to their AVID “family,” an experience that is helpful to those who need support from peers and teachers. In all, AVID is a beneficial program to struggling students and minorities with its high-preforming track record of leading students to success at Orangewood High School.


Severo joins Orangewood High School staff as new career center teacher

By GABRIELLA GODINEZ

Deborah Severo is Orangewood High School’s new Career Center teacher. 

Prior to working for Redlands Unified School District she worked for what is now known as Accenture, as a senior consultant for their Change Management division in Connecticut. Right after that she was head of the Education and Training division of the Western region for Aetna/U.S. Healthcare. 

While working for RUSD she worked at Redlands High School, Redlands East Valley High School, and Citrus Valley High School for ten years as the Career Center Teacher. 

She said that what she likes most about Orangewood is the students and staff because everyone is very supportive. At Orangewood, she is able to do what she enjoys, which is helping students prepare for their futures. 

Severo has a son who graduated from REV. The rest of her family lives on the east coast. 

For fun, Severo likes reading, writing, painting, taking hikes and traveling. She was born in France and lived there until she was about three years old, then moved to Connecticut where she grew up. Later, she left for college in Massachusetts and New Jersey. She has also lived in Hawaii, Georgia, and Louisiana. She’s lived here in California for the past 25 years. 

During her high school years, she started at Sheehan High School for her freshman year and for the rest of high school she went to Southington High School. For her college courses she went to Mount Holyoke College for freshman and sophomore years. Then she could not afford it anymore because her parents would not complete the FAFSA forms. Severo paid for it herself. She then applied for transfer to Rutgers University and graduated with her Bachelors Degree in Psychology with a minor in Biology. 

Severo’s favorite foods are Italian and seafood. Her favorite music is mainly groups like Imagine Dragons and One Republic. 

Severo says that in 10 years she sees herself at Orangewood High School and also she aspires to have a book of her own poetry published. In the next 20 years she sees herself retired from the RUSD. 

Negrette begins new school year as office manager at Orangewood High School

By GABRIELLA GODINEZ 

Melissa Negrette is the new office manager at Orangewood High School. She worked at Citrus Valley High School for seven years as an administration manager. Before that she also worked at the San Manuel Administration Office for nine years.

Negrette had been looking for a change and that led to her promotion at Orangewood High School. 

Negrette has a husband and two children: a teenager and a toddler. She grew up in Highland, California and still lives there with her family. She says she likes where she has grown up.

While growing up in Highland she went to San Gorgonio High School and managed to graduate a whole year ahead of her class in 2003. After high school she chose to further her schooling and went to Ashford University to get her Bachelor’s Degree in Education Administration. 

Melissa Negrette sits at her desk in the Orangewood High School main office. (Ethic photo)

In Negrette’s likes spending her free time with her family and doing some self motivating activities such as group classes at the gym. She likes to listen to all types of music, but at the moment her “go to” music is country.

She says in 10 years she hopes to still be working at Orangewood High and in 20 years she hopes to be retired. 

Editor-in-chiefs’ letter: Ethic unites schools

BY MAYA SANCHEZ & LAURYN BEST

Coming into the school year in August, I didn’t know how much time and energy that I would put into newspaper, into Ethic. I didn’t know how much it would mean to me nor did I know how much that it would shape who I am today. I say this as I am giving recruiting speeches to classrooms (If you are reading this and are eligible to be in the newspaper class next year, I strongly encourage you to do it.), but I really and truly believe it: newspaper is great.

Sure, not everything about it is the best and there are some bumps in the road that are bound to get in your way, but the experience of it all is above anything else. I got to be a part of a deeply creative and innovative part of my school and I’m proud of it. I’m proud of starting the year with one product and ending the year with an even better one. I’ll be proud of next year’s staff for doing the exact same thing.

But what’s the thing that really made newspaper so great? No, it wasn’t the freedom of being able to write what I want (Although, writing about the musicals I went to this year was phenomenal.) No, it wasn’t covering the major sporting events. (While I say that, every time that I see Seth’s video compilation of a game, I get a little wonderstruck.) No, it wasn’t introducing myself as ‘Maya Sanchez, Redlands East Valley Senior and Ethic’s Editor-in-Chief’. (Okay, I have to admit, it was a little bit of that.)

The best part was being a part of the community of not just my high school, but of Redlands as a whole. Before joining, the most interaction I got of the other high schools were the girls on my soccer team and the few times that our athletic teams played each other throughout the seasons. But beyond that, it was always REV centered. And while that isn’t a bad thing in the slightest, being able to see my high school experience as a Redlands experience and not just a REV experience has been for the better. I’ve gotten more involved in the happenings in my community, have met new people that I’m proud to call my friends, and most importantly I get to truly call myself a part of this Redlands Community.

I know our schools try to bring us all together under a common cause, and while I do not think in any way that they have failed, I think that Ethic has succeeded. By covering three schools in the Redlands Unified School District, Ethic has really embraced what it means to be inclusive and it’s that quality that has made newspaper outstanding for me.

I am beyond grateful to be able to serve as your Redlands East Valley Editor-In-Chief and I hope that next year will be just as prosperous as this year. Thank you reading and I hope you have enjoyed this year’s publications and that you will enjoy all the years that will follow.

Again, thank you. This year has really been a year to remember.

If someone were to tell the middle school me that high school senior me would write my innermost thoughts and publish them for the world to see, I’d think they were full of it. If someone told the middle school me that high school senior me would make friends with kids across the city, I’d brush it off. If someone told middle school me that high school senior me that I, with my sometimes crippling social anxiety, would be the Editor-in-Chief of a student run newspaper; I would have laughed in their face. But none of these situations are hypothetical.

Living in a city big enough that the school district has to dictate where you will go to school , thus dictating who you interact with, you can settle in your area of comfortability. The people you’ve known for 3 years are the ones you continue to see for another 4. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Of course there are opportunities to cross these invisible lines if you wished, but I didn’t really.

The summer before my senior year, I attended AAA summer school to get ahead before the school year began. There I met Ethic News’ very own founder: Mrs. Aranda. One thing led to another, and I soon found myself staring at kids across the city through a flat screen t.v. The experience was unsettling to say the least. I wondered if I had a hard enough time communicating with people face to face, how was I supposed to succeed in this way?

But in all honesty things kind of just fell into place. Soon enough we were sharing jokes through a camera, and texting each other about things unrelated to newspaper. Things were actually more weird on the rare occasion we got the chance to see each other in person (all of these of which I can count on one hand). After a few moments of awkwardness, we just picked up where we left off last. Soon, I was calling the students who went to our so called “rival school” my classmates and friends.

It’s so easy to hide behind invisible barriers and decide we’re too different to ever get along without actually attempting to bridge the gap. Victimizing ourselves instead of trying to be the solution to the factionalized world we live in is something we have to end- and it starts in our own backyard. There is more than enough room in Redlands for the diverse group of people we have. This is exactly what Ethic News accomplishes through its determination to cover all schools, and the community as a whole.

I have so much pride in what we Citrus Valley Blackhawks do, and I also have so much respect for REV and Orangewood for their efforts to become good students and community members. This is a respect I wouldn’t have gained without stepping out of my comfort zone and joining Ethic News.

It’s been a wild ride, and I’ve grown in a lot of ways along the journey. I hope next year’s team passes on the tradition of inclusivity through covering the great city we all call home.

Orangewood Starts New Fitness Club

By CECILIA VALENZUELA

At Orangewood High School there is a new activity called the Fitness Club. It first began Thursday, Jan. 26 and helped begin a new start for 2017. This was created to complete athletic goals for students and staff of Orangewood High. This program is to help provide new physical ways to stay fit and healthy. So far, the program has been running successfully and is managing well.

The program is managed by the Blue Cross Athletics Team, Redlands University, and the Redlands Police Department. The club is scheduled every Thursday for the next 11 weeks. The students and staff that attended the program were overjoyed to see that the instructors were extremely motivated to help students and staff get to their potential goals of 2017. They also provided all types of equipment ranging from cowbells and pull up bars, to kettlebells and stability balls; it also included many more different physical supplies.

The class begins right after school from 1:45 to 2:45, every Thursday of each week through the rest of the school year. The fitness club consists of three fitness instructors that are also involved in the police force and some students and staff that come along from Redlands University. Every week there is a new unit of movement that consists of different body workouts, so that every time you come it is a different routine. At the end of the program, the participants stretch out and talk about different ways that they can help themselves start a new lifestyle of living.

“Every 15 Minutes” sparks conversation

By JAYLEN ALLAN
On 16 Feb. and 17 Feb. the Orangewood High School leadership team attended the Every 15 Minutes program at Redlands High School accompanied by OHS leadership adviser Louise Gonzales.
The Every 15 Minutes program is a way to make people aware of drunk and distracted driving. Every 15 minutes someone dies from a driver who is either drunk or not paying attention to where they are going. This causes a lot of grief and loss in families and friends.
The program’s goal is to ensure that people are looking where they are going and not driving intoxicated so that the world can be safer.

Hobbies of Mike Strozier, a Student at Orangewood High School 

By JAYLEN ALLAN

Mike Strozier has many hobbies such as skateboarding, biking, playing with his dog and yugioh. He has many friends that had some wonderful things to say about him. Lots of people have good things to say about him.

One person is Diana Becerra who says that Strozier is “a very interesting person”. Andrew is another person who says that “Mike is odd in a cool way”.  Dwayne Ford says that “he is quite the friend to have”.

Strozier also enjoys going off of jumps on his bike going really fast and sometimes faceplanting. He is quite the adventurous type when it comes to thinking in class. He will go far beyond in his work in class and surprises even the teacher he could be a teacher himself.

OHS’s Andrew Davis has Many Options and Words to Describe Him

PictureOrangewood High School student Andrew Davis

By JAYLEN ALLAN

Andrew Davis is a busy high school student who enjoys drawing, film, Yugioh, skateboarding, story writing, music writing, and gaming as his hobbies. After he graduates he looks forward to being either a blacksmith or a massage therapist.

Before Andrew came to OHS he says he was a lazy student who was dealing with what is known as super depression. Andrew is always looking for some new way to help people.

Aiden Martin says that Andrew is, “a cool friend to have.” 

“He is a nice and kind person,” says Blanca Madrigal.

“He is supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” Mike Strozier.  

​Christian Aichele says that, “He is very respectful person.”

​Caileb Misale said Andrew was, “A person I enjoy being around.”

Many people describe him as, “funny,” “smart,” “creative,” “crazy in a good way,” and “charismatic.”  


OHS Root Beer Floats Sell Rapidly

By JAYLEN ALLAN

PictureJaylen Allan serving root beer


Picture

Orangewood High School began the school year with a successful event on Aug. 26, selling root beer floats to students as a Leadership fundraiser.

The root beer floats were sold out quickly, as the cups were very popular because of the unique light-up design.

​Many people expressed disappointment that the cups sold so quickly, stating that they were willing to even buy a second cup just to get another root beer float. For health reasons, another root beer float could not be sold in the same cup.

The leadership teacher, Mrs. Louise Gonzalez, was surprised at how quickly they sold. She expected it to take all of the lunch period, but instead it took about three quarters of the lunch.

The cups must have been special, because to this day people are still carrying them around school.


OHS Staff Member Cindy Kaiser Makes the Switch from Teacher to Counselor 

By LIAM McABEE and JAYLEN ALLAN

​Orangewood High School counselor, Cindy Kaiser, has previously been a teacher at Judson and Brown Elementary, Beattie Middle School, Kingsbury Elementary, and Fairfax Elementary for 19 years collectively.

Kaiser decided to become a counselor because, “my friend got a degree for counseling and I thought, ‘hey I can get that too!”. So Kaiser got her counseling degree and became a counselor at Orangewood High School. She has been working at Orangewood for four years now and enjoys it very much.

Kaiser’s favorite hobbies include shooting her 9mm pistol, hiking, and traveling. Her favorite breed of dog is a hound puppy.

Kaiser also loves frogs, mainly because when she was teaching first grade a student gave her a frog. Over the years, she received more and more frogs throughout her 19 years as a teacher, and got more while being a counselor. The students at Orangewood are lucky to have her. Diana Becerra says that “Mrs. Kaiser is strangely amazing” and the Orangewood principal Carol Ruhm says, “Mrs. Kaiser is a phenomenal counselor.”