Women living in a man’s world

By KENDRA BURDICK and NALEIAH MILLER

When you’re walking down a street and you feel like someone is following you, you turn to the left and right and see no one. People like to believe that their perception of being followed is just a mental construct. Humans have an instinct when they are being “hunted” just like animals do. Knowing how to handle the circumstance could potentially save your life or someone else’s life.

How Men are Attacking Women:

The reasons behind these attacks are complex and varied. In some cases, it is rooted in a culture of misogyny and patriarchy, where women are seen as prey to men. In other cases, it may be driven by the want of sexual gratification which is mainly found in testosterone according to the physiological site “Psychology Today.”

Poisoned Napkin:

One of these incidents involves Erin Mims, a woman, who was trying to get into her car when she found a tissue in the door of the car. When asked about the incident Mims replies “I didn’t think nothing of it, I just threw it out,” says Mims. “I opened the door with the tips of my fingers. I asked my husband, did you put a napkin in the door? And he said no.” 

Above is an example of what Mims saw before she touched the poison and became a victim. Other women have gone through this, and there has yet to be a stop to this. (KENDRA BURDICK/ETHIC NEWS)

She touched the tissue and threw it away and continued to her normal routine “Five minutes and my whole arm started tingling and feeling numb. I couldn’t breathe,” Mims continues, “I started getting hot flashes, my chest was hurting, and my heart was beating fast.” 

After touching the tissue, her husband took her to the hospital but there was little they could do and the effects of the tissue were high. Mims states that “They said my vitals were all over the place. The doctor came in, and told me it wasn’t enough in my system to determine what it was, but said it was acute poisoning from an unknown substance.” Her doctor even told her it was most likely a failed kidnap attempt and she was lucky that someone was there to help her get to the hospital.

Separate:

A more recognized way that men attack women is to get them separated from everyone else and that’s all they need to hurt, damage, and take a woman like hunted prey. Many police officers and detectives such as Shelly Martin say to “never go anywhere by yourself, especially women, it’s sad to say but that’s the truth.”

Backseat:

Attackers in the backseats is a well-known but very real and dangerous situation that does happen to women and typically ends in the women being kidnapped or killed. FBI.org helps to share a confession of one of these backseat killers, Samuel Little. This situation appears in movies, shows, books, and other forms of media such as the film Urban Legend.

When people hide in the backseat it’s easy to overlook them and not give notice of their presence. This allows for an easy attack on predators and an easy getaway. (KENDRA BURDICK/ETHIC NEWS)

Whatever the cause, the effects of these attacks are destructive. Women who experience violence are more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder according to PTSD.va.gov. They are also more likely to experience physical injuries, unwanted pregnancies, and even death.

Red Flags:

Predators will manipulate your emotions and take action to catch you. Even whether it comes to romantic relationships, the workplace, or even education.

Creating Emotional Dependency:

The predator’s first move in a love relationship is to establish emotional dependence. They are very supportive and lavish their victims with gifts, flattery, and undivided attention. It occurs when the abuser gives the victim everything they could need or want. Then they’ll start acting differently, mistreating them until they are placed in risky situations or even institutions.

Using Manipulative Behavior and Language:

Verbal Sexual harassment is also known as the use of manipulative language. The abuser will gradually start to turn negative, making fun of the victim’s appearance, and choice of friends, and attempting to control as much as possible. Predators will begin to make their victims believe they are to blame for everything, including the way the predator treats them leading them to reevaluate their entire existence. 

Then there is gaslighting which involves the exploitation of past experiences, memories, or things like childhood trauma. The abuser exploits this and makes the victim think that what they’ve experienced was a deception and that they were the problem. 

Megan’s Law allows anyone to see sex offenders anywhere and everywhere. Even more so, people can see what the charge is such as in this picture of the registered sex offenders in Redlands California. (KENDRA BURDICK/ETHIC NEWS)

Pushing Physical and Sexual Boundaries: Physical harassment might result from dominant and controlling behavior. Beginning with innocent touching, it will eventually progress to unwelcome and unwanted touching or nonconsensual sexual intercourse. This may occur in a variety of settings, including workplaces. In a professional setting remarks or actions might seem unoffensive, but if they become persistent over time, they’ll become harassment. 

Jealous and Controlling Behavior: 

Sexual predators will display jealousy that can often turn into controlling or dominant behavior. Predators show extreme possessiveness toward their victims, friends, co-workers, sometimes family members, or other people that are in close contact with them. The predator will begin to monitor their victims’ comings and goings, even attempting to restrict the victim’s contact with other people. 

Being in Close Contact with Children: Predators come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Male heterosexuals are more likely to be among them. To control children, they’ll employ a variety of strategies and gimmicks. Phases are one of these techniques

  • “Can you keep a secret
  • “You’re my special friend”
  • “Let’s spend some quality alone time together”
  • “Does someone need a hug” 
  • “Want to hear a dirty joke”
  • “ Your parents don’t understand you. I know how you feel”
  • “Let’s play the pocket game”

First, it will start as innocent and cute like a hug and a kiss on the cheek, or saying that’s my special friend and gift giving. Saying that their parents don’t understand them, to try and separate the parents to ensure their trust. As time goes by it will continue to escalate like spending alone time together and playing games like the pocket game (where they have money in their undergarments and the child has to find it). 

This leads to the predators encouraging sexual contact and introducing them to sexually explicit shows, movies, and videos. If your child experiences any of this take precautions and let them know they can talk to you. 

Defend yourself:

The good news is that there are ways to fight back against these attacks. Governments and organizations around the world are working to create laws and policies that protect women from violence and discrimination. Additionally, grassroots organizations are providing support and empowerment to women who have experienced violence.

It’s been proven that men have a sixth sense of spotting vulnerability. Most men like confident women dressed in modern or revealing clothes, over curvy women wearing jeans and a t-shirt. They’ll seek out kind-hearted and compassionate women who are willing to assist everyone without even knowing them. 

Predators will do anything to get you alone. All it takes is one time. However it’s the element of surprise, they think of women as helpless, petite, and fragile. When you know how to defend yourself, your attackers are taken aback, giving those few seconds to find your escape or fight for it. 

You should always use hiding as a last resort if you find yourself in a room with an attacker. If possible, instead of running or hiding, confront them directly.

Pressure points are sensitive places on the body that, when hit hard enough, can help you hurt your attacker and get yourself away from them. (KENDRA BURDICK/ETHIC PHOTO)

Tips (In your own home): 

  • Get to know your neighbors 
  • Small security cameras 
  • Get a type of animal that can protect you 
  • Know your house (entry points, a place to hide
  • Know where live (city, street, zip code)
  • Hide secret Weapons 
  • Tips (Unknown Area):
  • Always be aware of your surroundings
  • If you feel like you’re being watched, get somewhere where there are’s people.
  • Use your phone to see behind you.
  • Go on call so you’re not alone

Tools:

  • Getting portable door locks to take with you wherever you go
  • Keychain tasers 
  • Door stopper alarms
  • Window locks
  • Hammer
  • Pocket knife
  • Key in knuckles

Anything that you can find around your surroundings that is heavy can knock your attacker unconscious or damage them enough to make your escape. 

To-Go-Bag:

This can be left near your door in case you ever need to make a quick getaway and you have some supplies such as;

  • Extra clothes
  • Burner phone
  • A little bit of money
  • Medical kit
  • Notebook (to write what happened and to keep your mind off the incident)
  • Flashlight

At the same time, individuals need to take action as well. People must recognize that violence against women is a serious problem and take steps to ensure that our communities are safe and respectful places for all. People must speak out against violence and discrimination and support those who have experienced it.

The fight against violence against women is far from over. But with the right policies, support, and action, we can make a difference and create a world where all women are safe and respected.

Q&A: Second-year Wildcat teacher gives a review of his high school experience

By ALEX VERDUZCO

Brandon Ford is a newer addition to the Redlands East Valley High School staff and is in his second year teaching on campus. Before REV, he spent 18 years teaching at Redlands High School.

Brandon Ford poses at his desk in his classroom at Redlands East Valley in Redlands, California on Jan. 17, 2023 (ALEX VERDUZCO/ Ethic News Photo)

What does your involvement look like on campus?

I teach two different classes. I teach American government for two sections and sociology for two sections, mostly upperclassmen and then I am the head softball coach on campus. 

How do you hope to positively affect the staff and students here at REV?

I think the best way to impact, to be a cog in the machine, is to try and be myself. I am a pretty energetic person, I’m very passionate and I care about my students in the classroom and I care about the players that play for me and I think that the more that we have on campus [students] that the kids know that the staff is unified under the ideas of trying to help them and nurture them through these tough times of school. 

How would you describe your high school years?

I grew up in a small town, a farming area, we don’t even have a stoplight still, so it was a small school with about 350 kids when I went to high school. School for me was not easy, it was a struggle having some learning disabilities and things we didn’t know back then, and it made certain subjects hard. And so I had to go and get extra help and tutors in math and science just to get through since nobody in my family had gone to college but I was told at an early age that I was going to. I needed to make sure I was on a path to do that.

If you could leave your high school self a message, what would it be?

What I would tell myself is to just keep doing what I’m doing, keep working hard and have that work ethic—don’t be afraid to get help. Honestly, believe in yourself because you’re going to get there kid, you’re going to be able to achieve this and reach the goals you want to reach so keep believing and trusting yourself.

Where did you attend college?

I started out taking a football scholarship to Chico State University after high school, but they dropped their football program and I transferred to the University of Redlands. I finished there, with my social studies degree. I coached in college for two years while I was getting my masters in education at the University of Redlands. I never moved back home, I fell in love with this place. 

What guided you to this career choice?

I was impacted at an early age. I was involved in a lot of sports, my goal was to be a professional baseball player. I was good enough to play in college and was proud of that but I had teachers and coaches in school, who I still tell stories about in my classroom. They believed in me and pushed me. I was an athlete that responded to being challenged and they knew how to challenge me in the right ways. When you put out the work ethic, they notice that and give you positive praise for that and I built relationships with those people. I sat back in class one day as a junior [in high school] and I remember just thinking about what I wanted to do and I thought about these people, teachers, coaches. I thought, ‘That’s a good life,’ you get a chance to be on campus and play a positive role in mentoring these people that are trying to figure out their lives and need more help.

Redlands East Valley sociology teacher and softball coach, Brandon Ford, stands in front of banners and posters hanging on his classroom wall of the J-Wing of the REV campus.
(ALEX VERDUZCO/ Ethic News Photo)

What would you be if you weren’t a teacher?

I would probably be a firefighter or go into the military. What I would have liked to be but probably would have never done is be a DJ or someone working for a company that had to do with music because I love music a lot.

Which hobbies and/or interests would you like to share with students to take interest in?

I believe if you want the students to buy into your classroom then you have to get them to buy into you as a person, they have to know that you are a person with likes and dislikes. I try to show them my love of music and the places I’ve seen, and the bands I’ve seen. I like to talk about sports a lot and life stories in my classroom. I have no problem connecting who I am and what my journey has been and letting the students know that. I feel that making connections with pop culture and making connections to the students helps them buy into you as a person.

Any advice for REV students?

Life is a journey, not a destination, don’t feel like you have to have it all figured out right now. If you do that’s great, if you don’t you’re alright. Life is going to take you down these roads and paths that you’re going to have to choose and sometimes you’re going to pick the wrong ones and sometimes the right ones. Believe in yourself and understand that this is your journey and never lose sight of that. Don’t let the hard times take you far out of your path, you only get one shot. Bet on yourself and believe that you can do this and you’ll succeed. It’s not a race to get to the end, it’s how you get there.

Orangewood counselor and outdoor enthusiast takes on a new adventure

By LAUREN BISHOP AND JOSHUA ZATARAIN 

Known as an amazing counselor and great human being, students already miss him and he hasn’t left yet.

Jason Knight, Orangewood High School counselor, is known around campus as a kind and comedic counselor that can relate to students and their situations.

Although he loves Redlands, Knight is going to move to Tennessee and work as a behavioral intervention teacher at an elementary school. 

Orangewood High School guidance counselor Jason Knight and senior Lauren Bishop stand at the front entrance. Knight has been Bishop’s counselor at Orangewood and she says of Knight, “He makes me so comfortable because he can actually relate to my situation.” (JOSHUA ZATARAIN/ Ethic News photo)

Knight has been working in the fields of education for “a while now“ or to be more accurate, 30 years. 

As a guidance counselor, Knight’s favorite part of his job is “helping students graduate.” 

On the contrary Knight’ hardest part of being a counselor is “watching students struggle with stuff such as personal issues and that sort; it makes it hard for them to graduate.”

“Mr. Knight is comforting and he actually listens when you open up to him,” says Orangewood junior Xiomara Sanchez.   

Unlike traditional quarter or semester calendars, Orangewood operates in a block system where grades are due every three weeks and counselors have to check transcripts of every student assigned to them every three weeks. Having to check 150 students almost at the same time monthly can be stressful but Knight manages.

Angel Leon describes Knight as “a cool counselor.” 

“He understands the situation I’m going through because of the situations that we share,” says Leon.  

Knight is from San Diego and claims to be “like an Orangewood student, to be completely honest.” 

As a teenager, Knight says, “I didn’t like school. I think that’s part of why I do okay here.”

His advice to his teenage self would be, “Work a little bit harder in high school because it does make a difference.”

Before being a counselor, he worked for a car dealership delivering car parts and then as a teacher.

Outside of his work, Knight enjoys being outdoors and volunteering for the police department.

In his community volunteer role, Knight says that he likes the people he works with but has seen “ugly fires, bad accidents and people who aren’t always happy with you.”  

Knight describes himself as an introverted extrovert who enjoys the outdoors.

He says he’s going to miss waking up to “the view of the hills in my front yard.” 

He likes to travel and his idea of traveling is going camping, hiking and just overall being outdoors. 

He likes visiting national parks with his wife and his goal is to hit all of the national parks in the contiguous United States. 

As an outdoors person, he doesn’t play video games much now, but remembers playing Atari as a kid or going to the pizza place to play video games.

Knight also used to speak a little German but over the years he’s lost it as he never really used it. 

He loves his family and friends and likes “just hanging out and being able to talk to somebody that will listen.” 

He owns a Chiwawa Mix and her name is Trixsy who he says is very friendly.

As to the controversial question on whether pineapple belongs on a pizza, Knight says, “If you ask my wife she would say yes but, if you ask me, I’m not so sure.”

This semester is his last with Redlands Unified School District and as a counselor at Orangewood. After that, he will start his new position as a behavior intervention teacher in Tennessee.

His message is, “Let’s treat each other with kindness, because we all need it.”

Diving into who coach Bruich is

BY JASMINE ROSALES

Showing his humorous side, Coach Bruich strikes a pose for the camera (JASMINE ROSALES/ETHIC NEWS)

Growing up, Citrus Valley High School football coach Kurt Bruich was an all around athlete who dabbled in whatever sport was in season. From a young age, Bruich could always be found on the court, the diamond, the mat, or field year round, but the football field at Fontana High School where his dad, Dick Bruich coached, would be the place that would shape Bruich into the person he is today. 

As a child, Bruich grew up in Fontana, California. He is the middle child with one older sister, who is 11 months older, and a younger brother, who is nine years younger than him. While growing up, his older sister became his best friend, they did everything together. The two of them would always be outside playing sports or games until the street lights came on. 

 Jerry Sheare, an English teacher at CV, shares his fond memories of his childhood spent with Bruich. 

“I remember racing up and down the sidelines running fade routes with Kurt before, during and after every FOHI game,” Sheare says, “We topped it off with greasy pizza from Mazzullis, what could be better for the sons of two football coaches?”

With his dad as the head football coach at Fontana High School at the time, Mr. Bruich was busy coaching during the fall. So because of that, Bruich and his sister would go to school with their dad to the practices where they learned to run around the school and make it like their second home.

In high school football, Bruich was an offensive player. He played both sides of the ball, but on offense he played wingback and H-back. 

Being able to be coached by his dad really impacted Bruich because his father is his role model. Bruich grew up watching his dad impact his friends’ lives on and off the field.

Elijah Penrice, a senior at Citrus Valley states “He’s taught me to keep myself in check and i’m the one who controls my own destiny, he really has been a role model and father figure in my life for the past four years and I will always be grateful for that.”

Seeing what he was able to do, the lessons he taught them, and just the impact he made overall really inspired him to do the same as a coach now. 

Bruich’s platform is to not only teach his team how to win on the field but to also win in life. He wants to be able to mentor kids the way he watched his dad do when he was younger. It’s deeper than football.

Penrice also says, “One thing that I’ll take with me that coach B taught me is to be resilient in any situation life threw at me and keep pushing to my ultimate goal whatever that may be.”

Bruich shares how having past players come visit him 20 years later and to see how they’ve grown as a person and even as parents is what it’s all about. He takes great pride in every kid that he coaches and loves watching them become great players and people. 

Leaving high school, Bruich received a scholarship to Cal Polytechnic State University where he majored in Physical Education with an emphasis in Sports Psychology. He attended CPSU for two years and then transferred to the U of R where he received his degree in physical education and a masters in education.

Following Bruich’s college graduation, he had already begun his coaching career while assisting his dad in the spring during Bruichs’ off season. After graduating from the U of R, Bruich became a graduate assistant. 

His first head coach position was at Cerritos High School, Bruich got the position at just 23 years old. Moving from Cerritos to Redlands became a reality when one of his old college coaches called him, and asked if this is somewhere he would want to be. 

“Being in Redlands, Inland Empire, it’s home to me so it was an easy decision for me to come back” Bruich confidently answered. 

He then got hired for Redlands East Valley High School and to Citrus Valley where he is currently working as the head coach of the Blackhawks. 

Early on Bruich knew he wanted to have a family, so when he moved to Redlands to coach at REV, he had been given a miracle.

At his first head coach position at Cerritos, he met his wife, Lisa Bruich in the spring of 1988 where she worked as the cheerleading coach. The two began dating in January of 2002, they got engaged three months later on April 1, 2002. That following year she was hired to teach English at Moore Middle School. Currently, Mrs. Bruich serves as the Director of Human Resources in the district office.

Coach B and Mrs. Bruich were inseparable since. With time, Bruich would get married to his best friend.

“Because of Coach Bruich’s support and encouragement, I have been able to accomplish many things. We’re a great team and I am truly thankful,” Mrs Bruich shares.

Working together as a team, the pair have accomplished many things in their careers. Bruich achieved his 200th win this season at Citrus Valley.

On coach Bruichs right arm, he has a tattoo to signify him and his dad’s coaching. The state of california as the base, the top ring was when Bruichs dad were state champs under his coaching in 1989. The ring under that is when coach Bruich led the Redlands East Valley team to the championships in 2014. Bruich and his father are the only father and son duo who have each won state championships and won 200+ games in their career. (JASMINE ROSALES/ETHIC NEWS)

Throughout the years, Bruich had to overcome many challenges growing up which have shaped him into who he is today. From being the son of the head football coach, having an older sister who was an All California Athlete in two different sports and got a scholarship to Marymount California University. This left Bruich with a lot of pressure on him to live up to the Bruich name his family had built up. He really wanted to find his own identity and create a name for himself. 

Going through a rough patch in his early 20’s showed Bruich just how strong he was as a person, having to relay and rebound from unfortunate circumstances made him stronger. Meeting his wife and committing to a relationship, and being able to establish himself as a coach separate from his dad really helped Bruich be able to define who he is. 

One of the many mottos that Bruich heavily believes is “Find your passion & pursue it.” This motto keeps him young and motivated and hopeful. Day by day he continues to better himself and continues to find his identity. 

In his spare time Bruich enjoys spending time with his family, as his two girls give him a purpose in life, he loves to watch sports, mainly football. Bruichs’ favorite hobby is barbequing. He loves to smoke all kinds of meat, and different woods, really changing it up. His specialty and well known brisket, seasoned with his special recipe. Smoking tri tip on a day to day basis is where it’s at, boneless chicken thighs the list goes on and on. 

Coach B, as many call him, is a very uplifting person with a sense of humor, Bruich shares that he is very keen on dad jokes and even has a book on them.

Taking it day by day, Bruich strives to better himself and see what the future holds for him. Hitting a milestone of receiving his 200th win on October 14, 2022, he is setting and achieving personal goals, always pushing for more. 

Orangewood’s engineering teacher keeps it real

By NATHANIEL JOHNSON and JOSH BENNECKE

TRISTAN HOLSOMBACH contributed to this article

Matthew Stewart is a fifth year engineering teacher at Orangewood High School with a goal to ”help as many students as possible…to achieve things beyond what they believe they are capable of.”

As a teacher in the Career Technical Education program, Stewart  likes seeing his students improve and realize that they can understand engineering.

“In Mr. Stewarts we are always working on something that is fun and creative,” says Orangewood senior Cody Thorpe, “From battlebots to CO2 cars, there is never a dull moment inside the class.”

“My favorite project in the class so far has been building battle bots,” says Thorpe, “This was my favorite project because we got full responsibility over our bots. Everyone’s bot was unique and had its own mechanism to destroy other students’ battle bots.”

Orangewood junior Ronnie Garcia says, “Stewarts my all time favorite bald teacher.”

Stewart had many careers before becoming a teacher.

“I started as a carpenter out of high school, transitioned into an operating engineer, then a surveyor, then moved into the office setting of a large civil engineering company,” says Stewart. 

“From there I started as a project engineer and moved into estimating and finally a general superintendent.  I then moved into ICT and worked as an IT director for a medium sized clinical laboratory consulting firm.” 

Stewart says he left that position in 2016. He started teaching at Orangewood in 2017 as a long-term sub for Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program and, Stewart says, “never left.”

Stewart also keeps two small businesses running in his spare time from being a full-time teacher.

Looking back at his younger years, Stewart describes his teenage-self as “a hot mess.” 

In high school, Stewart says he was saved by his football coach. His coach taught him to give 100% at everything that he did. 

“My brother and I were saved by our high school football coach,” says Stewart. “Without coach P,  my life would be much different.  He taught us to give 100% at anything and everything we do.  He held us to high standards and I can’t thank him enough for doing that.”

Stewart says that his advice to his teenage-self would be, “Change nothing, it’s worked out alright.”

Orangewood High School teacher Matthew Stewart instructs Engineering I students, seniors Justin Hernandez, Josh Bennecke and Cayden Van Winkle, on how to construct a box to hold transmitters for battle bots. (TRISTIN HOLLENBACH/Ethic News photo)

Citrus Valley High School’s engineering class visited Orangewood on Dec.7 to do a shared activity racing CO2 cars.

After Citrus Valley arrived, a large table was set up, one the length of the multi purpose room, the dragsters were pulled out and they were raced.

Stewart had a positive reaction about the event with Citrus Valley, saying it was “awesome.”

He proceeded to mention about how Orangewood took eight of the top ten positions and four of the top five against Citrus Valley.

According to Stewart, Citrus Valley teacher Brian Bartlett  actually asked how Orangewood did it.

Though Orangewood stood out, the top two positions of the two fastest dragsters were that of Orangewood seniors Nicholas Boiarski and Jeremiah Lopez.

Stewart had no opinion on the rules as they are by the national committee of the specific activity.

Stewart’s students also participate in the annual Rube Goldberg competition, and have won at the national level.

Youtube viewers can watch the final product of Orangewood High School student’s winning 2022 Rube Goldberg entry. Engineering teacher Matthew Stewart guides students in this project. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCQ49a9cGlI

According to Stewart, it is different every year and the objective is to build a contraption with random materials provided to get some task done. Prior to the main competition, the event has mini games where you can win materials or tools to aid you in the competition.

In each competition there are eight highschools, eight middle schools, and eight elementary schools. 

With the provided materials the competitors get six hours with only direction from the teachers chaperoning, no physical intervention even with power tools.

The Rube Goldberg Competition is at Rialto High School this school year on Feb. 4. 

Stewart has hobbies outside of school like fly fishing, riding off-road motorcycles and learning “something new as often as possible.” 

As for the most challenging part of teaching, “this is the easiest, most fun job I have ever had,” says Stewart.

Video: Wildcat marching band members speak about what makes the sport special

By NALIEAH MILLER

The marching band has been underestimated for a long time. This behind-the-scenes video shows hard work, discipline, skill, and emotion. These students use every practice to perfect the show and strive to make it the best. There is a family within this group as they are all the parts that make up Redlands East Valley High School’s marching band.

Q&A: Academic case carrier counselor helps students overcome challenges

By NORYAH COPAS

Sophia Malsher-Lopez is an academic case carrier counselor in the Redlands Unified School District. Malsher-Lopez is known as Ms. Sophia by her students and visits different schools, including Citrus Valley High School. 

What is your position or title? 

Academic Case Carrier Counselor

Pronouns?

she, her and hers

What are some of the main responsibilities with this position?

As a counselor, my main responsibilities are to ensure that students are successful academically and in their personal lives.  I help students with academic challenges, social challenges, mental health challenges, homelife challenges and help prepare them for life after high school. 

How long have you worked in education?

I have worked in education for seven years.

Have you held any jobs outside of education? 

Yes, I previously worked in the business sector and worked for a publishing company in the motorsport industry.  I dedicated nine years to Racer Media & Marketing and started out as an office manager and ended as an advertising manager

 What made you choose this job?  

My sister-in-law recognized I could be ideal material for becoming a counselor.  She encouraged me to apply for a position as a Career Coach so I did and loved the job within minutes!  I thought, “What have I been doing with my life?!”  I helped students with college and career readiness.  I immediately went back to school to get my Master’s degree in School Counseling. 

What is one of your favorite parts of your job?

My favorite part of being a counselor is working with students and helping them overcome barriers so they can be successful. Everyone deserves happiness and success and there can be many obstacles that get in the way of that, so I love to equip them with the tools necessary to both give the best of themselves and earn the best for themselves.   

What’s the hardest part of your job?

The hardest part of my job is to mentally shut off at the end of the working day.

Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?

Both my parents are hard workers yet endured very troubled times from their late teens through to their early 40s, a period where they went down potentially self-destructive avenues. They have shown me it is possible to overcome barriers and difficulties and find a way back to the right path – which undoubtedly contributes to my belief that the work I do can help nudge students in a direction that can lead to happiness and fulfillment. As for my parents, both have qualities that I admire and try to emulate:  my mother has the biggest heart I know and loves unconditionally, while my father is ambitious and never gives up.   

Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today?

I was never a studious person; I actually disliked school.  I knew I had to go to college because that was what my father wanted for his children.  He never wanted us to do physical work, he wanted us to build our brains and use them in the careers we chose.  It took me 12 years to get my Bachelor’s degree; it typically takes 4-6 years.  I learned to never give up and to just keep going even when you fail or it feels like a never ending journey.   

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Pay attention in school!

Which languages do you speak?

English and Spanish/Spanglish

Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share?

I like to hike, travel and eat.  I am interested in history and love to learn about different cultures and ways of living. 

What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

I love to create memories by trying new things, going to new places or spending the holidays together.

What is a goal you have?  

Although school is not my thing, I plan to finish my doctoral program within two years.

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Song captain chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by DANIELA MORA

Directed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Brooklynn Rios. Rios responds to questions about Associative Student Body (ASB) and song for the Redlands East Valley Wildcats. As always, Rios answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Dual Enrollment program offers high school students college credit

By MEANNA SMITH

The dual enrollment program offered in Redlands Unified School District high schools, which operates through Crafton Hills College, allows high school students to get college credit while also making high school credit.

Citrus Valley High School dual enrollment counselor Christina Rodriguez states, “I encourage high school juniors and seniors… to take the offered partnership and CCAP dual enrollment courses. UC and CSU colleges will weight the dual enrollment courses when considering admission to their campus. Simply put, dual enrollment makes college more affordable.”

According to the California Community Colleges website, dual enrollment offers college courses which are taught by college professors at students’ high school campuses. Each semester taken through dual enrollment will count for one year of high school credit. These courses help students get a head start on their higher education goals.

There are many different courses offered throughout the spring, summer, and fall terms. Some of the courses offered include American Sign Language, Introduction to Sociology, English Freshman Composition, Astronomy, and many more. 

Citrus Valley High School junior Danielle Diaz took the Intro to Sociology course at Crafton Hills College through the dual enrollment program last summer.

Diaz says, “It was interesting and I really learned a lot. I would definitely recommend the dual enrollment program as well as the intro to sociology course  to other students because it was an easy and beneficial way to gain credits.”

Citrus Valley junior Riley Houser, states “I took the medical terminology class through the dual enrollment program during ninth grade. It was interesting and I would recommend the program to other students.”

To enroll in dual enrollment, students must possess a weighted academic grade point average of  2.0 or more. There are three different types of dual enrollment available to students. These categories are listed as Partnership, College and Career Access Pathway, and Standard. 

Partnership dual enrollment consists of evening classes taught by Crafton Hills college professors on a high school campus. In recent years, partnership dual enrollment has moved from high school campuses to zoom instruction. 

CCAP dual enrollment is college courses offered during the school day. This type of dual enrollment is only offered to seniors. These courses will also count for high school graduation requirements. 

Lastly there is Standard dual enrollment which consists of courses not offered by Redlands Unified School district. This type of dual enrollment may also include fees that students will be responsible for such as textbook fees, registration fees, etc. 

According to the California Community Colleges website, to enroll in any of these types of dual enrollment, students must complete six steps. 

First: Complete an online college application.

Second: Complete the orientation by watching a video and answering the following questions.

Third: Submit Transcripts

Fourth: Meet with a counselor.

Fifth: Complete and submit a dual enrollment form

Sixth: Register for your desired college course.

The California Community Colleges website provides reasons for students to consider dual enrollment. Dual enrollment can provide students preparation and an introduction to college life and the opportunity to build skills that are needed in the workforce. 

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic –  Wildcat board of education trustee chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by DANIELA MORA

Directed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Frankie Russo. Russo responds to questions including about what her usual school day looks like and who inspires her the most. As always, Russo answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Q&A: Chats with Orangewood custodial and cafeteria staff

By MATTHEW MENDES, JUSTEN NGUYEN and JOSHUA ZARATAIN

This feature does not focus on one single person at Orangewood High School, but  three: Alfred Cabral, Mynel Shelton, and Cynthia Duran. Cabral and Shelton do the custodial work and Duran does the cafeteria work. They are staff workers who don’t get as much recognition due to the jobs they do around campus, but they deserve recognition because without them the Orangewood campus wouldn’t be what it is. All of three work hard to make Orangewood a positive place for everyone.

Mynel Shelton, custodian

Mynel Shelton, custodian at Orangewood High School, stands in front of a water fall garden on the Orangewood campus, an area staff and students find peaceful. Shelton is known for being friendly and conversational with anyone he meets. (MATTHEW MENDES/ Ethic News photo)

“A lot of people say they want peace, but they don’t do the things to make peace. Just say you’re sorry and move on.”

Mynel Shelton, custodian at Orangewood High School

Matthew Mendes: What inspired you to become the person you are today?

Mynel Shelton: Initially I wanted to start working for the district. They had many departments. It was something I wanted to do. So, I applied and tested. A lot of the people that were working there were working as custodians. So naturally, I tried the position out. Working as a custodian started off as embarrassing, but it soon became very fulfilling for me. You get to know all kinds of people, students and staff. I am truly blessed working here.

Mendes: How long have you been working here and why did you choose Orangewood?

Shelton: In custodial work, the school typically chooses who they want to work there. I was selected by Orangewood to work, and accepted the position. I soon grew to love it here.

Mendes: What do you like to do in your spare time?

Shelton: Karaoke, racquetball, and chess are some of my passions in life.

Mendes: If you could have any car with money not being an issue, what car would you choose?

Shelton: I would go for an electric truck, from Rivian. Gas is too high nowadays.

Cynthia Duran, child nutrition services worker

Cynthia Duran is the child nutrition services worker that students see in the cafeteria daily for breakfast, snack and lunch at Orangewood High School. Students call her Ms. Cindy and describe her as “sweet,” “chill,” and “kind.” Orangewood custodian Mynel Shelton says that they also call her Cinderella. (Joshua Zatarain/ Ethic News photo)

“Just be kind.”

– Cynthia Duran, child nutrition services worker at Orangewood High School

Josh ZatarainWhat inspired you to become the person you are today?

Cythnia Duran: My love for kids of all ages, as I used to be a daycare teacher for many years.

Zatarain: How long have you been working here and why did you choose Orangewood?

Duran: I was assigned to Orangewood and have been here for six yearsWhen I was first assigned I didn’t want to come here but of course that changed and now I won’t leave Orangewood.

Zatarain: What do you like to do during your spare time?

Duran: I like to watch movies, read comedies. I like romance and my favorite movie is “Sleepless in Seattle.”

Zatarain: If you could have any car, with money not being an issue, what car would it be?

Duran: I would like a palisade SUV because I like SUVs.

Alfred Cabral, lead custodian

Alfred Cabral, lead custodian at Orangewood High School, stands in front of a student artwork of the school mascot. Students describe Cabral as friendly and hard-working. From before school to after school students see Cabral around campus helping people and working to keep the campus looking its best. (Justen Nguyen/ Ethic News photo)

“Enjoy it like it is because time flies fast.”

– Alfred Cabral, lead custodian at Orangewood High School

Justen Nguyen:  What inspired you to become the person you are today?

Alfred Cabral: My dad and his work ethic

Nguyen: What do you like to do in your spare time?

Cabral: I play the drums, when I was younger I played basketball, and I am also a concrete contractor.

Nguyen: How long have you been working here and why did you choose Orangewood?

Cabral: 11 years at Orangewood, because I wanted to work days instead of nights at RHS.

Nguyen: If you could have any car with money not being an issue, what car would you have?

Cabral: A Ferrari because when I was younger I had a poster of a Ferrari in my room.

Orangewood High School custodian Mynel Shelton, nutrition worker Cynthia Duran and custodian Alfred Cabral stand at the entrance of Orangewood on Texas St. in Redlands. (Matthew Mendes/ Ethic News photo)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat Drum major chats candidly

Interviewed by KENDRA BURDICK

Filmed by DANIELA MORA

Directed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Jennan Foutz. Foutz responds to questions about marching band and the 2022 marching band show for the Redlands East Valley Wildcats. As always, Foutz answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Wildcats welcome back Assistant Principal Heidi Van Deventer

By ALEX VERDUZCO

Heidi Van Deventer is the newest addition to staff here at Redlands East Valley High School as the  new assistant principal. This is not her first time teaching at REV and worked during its first two years teaching summer school. Until prior to this year, she worked locally at Moore Middle School as vice principal for eleven years. At Moore her career expanded to include teaching sixth grade math, science, eighth grade algebra and English Language Development (ELD) as well as seventh grade social studies. Her background also includes being a math teacher on assignment for two years, principal of AAA Academy of Redlands, summer school teacher at Clement and Department Chair of math. 

Redlands East Valley High School’s Vice Principal Van Deventer poses in her office in front of her wall of inspirational quotes to keep her motivated during the school day on September 8, 2022. (GEFFREY ACOSTA/ETHIC Photo)

How do you hope to positively affect the staff and students here at REV?

When I’m out there [front school gates] in the morning before school starts I like to greet the students coming into school with a smile and a wave to change their day and to possibly be someone to come and talk to. No one is perfect, not even myself, and everyone can improve.

What is your motivation in life?

My parents said that education is a gateway to college. I am a first generation college graduate in my family. They said to open up doors by reading and to always continue reading books for more knowledge.

If you could leave your high school self a message, what would it be? 

Get involved more as a freshman and sophomore, do not wait until your junior and senior years to start getting involved in clubs.

*Follow up* How would you describe your high school years?

I attended an all- girls Catholic high school in San Diego, California and I loved it. It was a different high school experience than REV, but I liked that appearance didn’t nearly matter as much and it was very comfortable going to school there. I was also the ASB historian and I played right field on the Varsity softball team. I enjoyed high school but college was an easier experience for me.

Where did you attend college?

I went to Cal Poly Humboldt State and Point Loma Nazarene University after high school. I love math and I even tested out of math in college but I took them anyway as electives.

Which hobbies and/or interests would you like to share with students to take interest in?

I like watching the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. I have always been interested in sports and I consider myself sports-minded. I also really like ceramics. I started becoming interested in high school and throughout college but I don’t make any ceramics anymore, I mostly just watch TV programs.

What are the highlights of your career?

The highlights of my career would be when I get to have students on campus and know that I taught their parents previously at Moore or Clement and see them around the school. Overall being able to see that my previous students now have successful jobs in life. Also seeing them succeed and do well in school is always a great thing.

Any words of wisdom for the students at REV?

I would tell them to believe in themselves. I am an open book and I have an open-door policy. The students are always welcome to stop by and chat.

What guided you to this career choice? 

I have always wanted to be a teacher. Even when I was a kid I loved to play school and pretend to be the teacher. However, it wasn’t until I started teaching at Clement that I had decided to go into administration.

Correction: Ethic News incorrectly published information in the original Sept. 27 posting of this article stating that Heidi Vandeventer taught English. Heidi Vandeventer was math department chair at Moore and Clement. She taught eighth grade algebra and English Language Development, but not English. The article was updated to reflection this correction at 2:29 pm on Sept. 28.

Teacher Feature Q&A: Karen Knudson Wilson welcomes students to Orangewood

By STEPHANIE ELENA PEREZ

Karen Knudson Wilson, is a teacher at Orangewood High School. She teaches American Government and OASIS. OASIS stands for Orientation, Assessment, Study Skills, Insight, Success. Every student who attends Orangewood, starts by taking the OASIS class for three weeks with Wilson and Stephanie Sachs, Foods and OASIS teacher. OASIS is an introduction class where students learn about the school, themselves and each other. For example, Wilson guides students through writing an essay about themselves, such as where they grew up, the school they came from and other topics. Students see Wilson as a caring teacher, and OASIS teachers as the “moms” of new students at Orangewood.

Wilson answer questions about her teaching career, interests, and people who influenced her.

How many years have you been teaching?

Wilson: I have been teaching for 14 years. Prior to teaching I was a school administrator and counselor. 

If you were able to choose a different career path would you still choose to teach or would you choose something else?

I really love being a teacher. Knowing I have a positive impact on young people means so much to me. I’d very likely choose being an educator all over again, even though I had the chance to go to law school.

Have you had a different job besides teaching?

Yes! I started out my career as an elementary school counselor and was then promoted into school administration overseeing counseling and intervention programs for a neighboring school district. When I became a mom I took some time off and returned to education (as a teacher) so I could be on the same schedule as my children.

What do you enjoy about being able to teach students?

I love the day to day fun teaching brings. Everyday is different, and it’s definitely never dull. What I enjoy most about educating students is helping them realize the decisions they make today will impact their future. 

What made you want to teach?  

I grew up with a mom who worked in public education for over 30 years. Seeing the impact she made on kids made me want to have a career with a purpose like that, too.

Did you have role models growing up? 

My parents were amazing role models. My dad served in the military, went to school at night, coached little league and still managed to make time for his family everyday. My mom took care of all of us and always made time to take us to practice, our games and the events with our friends. 

If so how were you influenced by them?

The best thing they did for me and my brothers is give us their time. It really shaped who I became as a person and a parent myself.

If you could, what advice would you give students?

Put down your cell phones. Try not to spend so much time watching everyone else’s life go by that you forget to live your own.

If you could travel anywhere in the world where would it be and why?

I love, love, love to travel and have been fortunate enough to visit many places around the world. I’d really like to make it to Bali and Greece someday…places by the water make me very happy. I also like to experience different cultures and foods.

Do you speak another language? If so what language do you speak and if you don’t, what language would you like to learn?

I know a little bit of Spanish and some ASL. I really wish I knew more!

What do you enjoy doing when you aren’t teaching? Do you have hobbies, interests?

When I’m not teaching I love to travel, read, cook and spend time with my family.

Do you have any goals you’d like to accomplish?

I would really like to move home closer to my parents. I’d also like to live by the beach someday and retire when there’s still plenty of time left to play and enjoy my life.

Is there something you would want people to know about you?

Playing little league baseball growing up and softball in high school led to a wonderful opportunity for me to attend college – I was the first person in my family to graduate.

Teacher Feature Q&A: Citrus Valley’s Stephen Howard talks about teaching life

By: Marshall Scott

Citrus Valley High Schools’ freshman English teacher, Stephen Howard answers 11 questions about himself and his years of teaching.  Howard has been teaching for 19 years, two of those 19 years spent at Citrus Valley.

Stephen Howard standing in his classroom where he teaches grade nine English at Citrus Valley High School. (Marshall Scott/ Ethic News Photo)

Q: What made you want to become a teacher?

“There was a point when I was in college and I felt like I could do more good trying to help educate people, to bring about positive change in the world as opposed to just me. That’s what kind of motivated me to become a teacher”

Q: What is one thing you wish you had known before teaching?

“I probably knew how much homework I would have going into teaching, I wished that I loved homework in high school, because teachers have lots of homework, and I didn’t like homework. I wish I had better prepared myself for all the homework that I have as a teacher.  It’s never ending”

Q: What made you want to teach highschoolers?

“I definitely didn’t want to teach middle school. I thought about [teaching for] colleges with older kids but then I thought “when you’re teaching college students, you’re limiting the interactions you have with students.” So I felt like high school would be a better fit for me so I focused on becoming a high school teacher”

Q: Is there a specific reason you wanted to teach English?

“English was my worst subject in highschool. I know how students don’t like English. I actually majored in English because I wanted to better myself as a person and improve on my deficiencies. The more I took English classes the more I started to realize just how important literature was to helping us to understand what it means to be human”

Q: In your opinion, what is the most frustrating part of teaching?

“The most frustrating part of teaching – here it’s a little different. Since I’ve been in California, I feel like I’m given the freedom to teach. I’m not burdened with [stuff like substituting without volunteering and entitled kids.] Back in Georgia we had lots of duties we would have to do. Here there’s a substitute – if they need someone to substitute for a class they ask for volunteers. Here I feel like I have a lot more freedom to be able to come to work, teach and go home. I’m much happier [in California]”

Q: If you weren’t a teacher what would you be?

“I was a farmer for a little while, I enjoyed that. It was like teaching in a way, you’re constantly learning new things everyday. I learn something new everyday in the classroom. In a classroom you learn about people, on a farm you learn about people, machines, equipment, something goes wrong everyday. In school something goes wrong everyday. I’m good at going with the flow, if something happens I don’t freak out. I can adjust”

Q: What subject is your favorite to teach in english?

“Probably the thing students hate the most, Shakesphear. I love poetry and we don’t have a lot of poetry in ninth grade literature”

Q: What would you consider to be the thing you dislike teaching the most?

“That society doesn’t truly appreciate the [teaching] that we do, though some people do. But it seems like the last couple years, all the kids are home, all the parents are like “Oh my god, go back to school, we love our teachers” and then COVID ends and all of a sudden “Oh no you can’t teach them this book, you can’t teach them this.” The whole back and forth with parents”

Q: Favorite thing to do outside of school?

“Fishing, specifically fly fishing and also traveling the world, that’s an easy one”

Q: Favorite thing about your students?

“The diversity of the kids. I have kids that like to draw, kids that like to write, kids that like to play sports. I can’t tell you how many ninth graders from last year still come by to see me. That makes [me] feel good”

Q: What would you say is your biggest pet peeve?

“Kids leaving trash in the classroom, it drives me crazy. Constantly having to go pick up water bottles and candy wrappers. Not throwing things in the trash, is one of my pet peeves in the classroom”

Q&A: New Wildcat theatre teacher talks perfectionism, plays and ‘Pride and Prejudice’

By KENDRA BURDICK

Starting in the 2022-23 school year, Ashley Visco is teaching at Redlands East Valley High School for her first year. She will be teaching Theatre Arts I and II. (Photo courtesy of  Ashley Visco)

Ashley Visco is a new teacher to Redlands East Valley High School staff. Visco teaches Theater Arts I and Theater Arts II and tries to make a colorful and inspiring learning environment for her students. Visco answers some questions about herself and her career below. 

Why did you choose this course to teach?

I loved theater forever. For as long as I can remember I was raised on it, a bit because when my dad was in high school he was heavily involved in theater. My sisters all loved musicals and things like that so I kinda grew up with a lot of plays and musical performances. Stories in general, I loved. I volunteered at my former high school Pomona Catholic High School, I volunteered for their theater program, helping out with their productions. I was working with the kids and I was like, I could teach this, it’d be fun and I’d enjoy doing it. But I didn’t know if I’d have the opportunity to teach a drama class, I’d always thought I’d go for English, so when this came up “Hey do you want to be our drama teacher?” I said “Yeah! I do.” I love this and it’s been really fun.

Did you teach at any other schools before REV?

This is my first teaching position and I did student teach at Upland High School and that is about it. Only Redlands so far.

 Why did you choose to teach at REV?

For sure I am really happy with REV and Redlands in general, Redlands Unified. I’ve had the opportunity to teach before this. I finished my program two years ago to work at charter schools and different things but I felt “It just doesn’t feel like a good fit.” Other schools just didn’t feel organized and it didn’t seem like they were prioritizing the kids. I almost worked at an arts high school which had a lot of theater kids coming in, but it still wasn’t the right fit for me. I got hired to do summer school for Redlands and I just really liked the district. Everyone was so nice and professional. Then this school interviewed me and was very nice and I hoped that I got the job. Everyone I’ve met has been so nice and lovely and the campus is big and beautiful and has this big, beautiful theater. My high school’s theater was like one-twentieth [the size of] of REV’s. 

 Why did you choose to become a teacher?

I talked to my English teacher saying “Hey, I want to be a writer.” Things changed with college. I was majoring in English and it didn’t feel purposeful enough, it didn’t feel like I was doing anything. It was like “what’s the point, what am I here for.” When I volunteered with those kids I thought it felt important. So I tried teaching because I liked working with young people and doing something that could matter. 

What would you be if you could have been anything other than a teacher?

I wanted to be a writer for a long time. I was very book obsessed and still am but my brain gets tired so unfortunately I haven’t sat down and read a good book in a while. I thought I’d be a writer because I love historical romance, Pride and Prejudice, and things like that. I wrote Pride and Prejudice fan-fiction back in the day. 

What’s important to you?

Respect is huge for me. Confidence is also very important because I like working with younger people and helping them find who they want to be. Especially because we all can remember what it’s like being at this time in your life (high school) its really difficult and you need those people who support you and build you up and being that person to students is important to me. Respect and love are all around for everybody. That’s something that I love about this theater department. “I can do anything and I’ve got people from different parts of theater that can come in here and try something new.” It’s an exciting position and I’d say that the most important thing is respect and love for everybody.

What’s something that you would like to tell students?

Focus on yourself. I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately cause it’s easy to get stuck in the day and your schedule and you try to get through it with your friends but it can get frustrating and it’s good to remember to focus on yourself and your needs. Especially with school, get done what you need to get done and you might not know where you’re going necessarily but that’s okay as long as in the moment, they are happy, healthy, and surrounded by people that are good for you.

What college did you go to?

I started at the University of La Verne right after I graduated from high school but my mental health started to slip a little bit to where I was struggling and I just wasn’t happy and finally I was struggling too. So I decided “Let’s take a break.” I worked and matured and tried to figure out what I wanted to do, that’s when I volunteered. I was like “Teaching sounds good. I worked with kids at the theater program and loved it.” So I went online and went to Grand Canyon University which is a cool program and I highly recommend that people decide if they want to go to college in person or not in person. I was struggling with the anxiety of being in college and being with all of those people and I realized that online works better for me. I got a Bachelor of Arts in English for secondary education, specifically for teaching English. 

What’s the biggest thing that you welcome into your classroom?

The bravery to try new things is huge and even if it’s the smallest thing. You don’t have to be “look at me” but if normally you’re kinda shy and you step out of your shell and do some of the exercises and games we play. The courage to do something silly is really important. Another thing I’ve been thinking about is that there’s so much shyness I think and the awkwardness of standing out in high school which I understand. Something that I value and appreciate is seeing someone willing to just do something as opposed to having the fear of standing out.

Who got you to where you are now?

My parents in the sense that they helped me get through a lot of school just by being very accepting and supportive. There was never too much pressure or too little pressure. They were like “Hey, we know you’re smart and do your best.” I didn’t struggle with school because of that so I appreciate that they were like that. I had an English teacher who was also the drama director at my high school. She was wild and wacky and we had a lot in common. We’d talk about Pride and Prejudice. We’d go out to Cal Poly Pomona and do Shakespearean competitions, we’d perform in front of people for prizes and stuff. My fiance has been super supportive, he’s somebody who helps you be yourself, to find out who you are and what you need. Finally, me. I helped myself get here and I don’t think I give myself credit enough which is something that I’m trying to work on cause I’ve worked hard and it’s difficult to look at yourself and say “You’re doing great right now.” I constantly think about what I did wrong and what I could do better. But it’s like “No. I’m doing great and I worked hard.” 

What is something that you’ve had to change about yourself to fit the job?

Perfectionism is deadly and I lived with it throughout my life. I didn’t realize it until I got older. There’s a part of you as a teacher, I found, that feels responsible for everything. I think that’s why some students see teachers as controlling because there’s a part of you (as a teacher) that makes you feel like it’s all your fault. If it’s not going well, you have to fix it. If a lesson didn’t go well it’s like “Oh my god, I’m the worst.” With cheating, I try to figure out what I did wrong and try to give the students a second chance. I’ve learned I need to just step back and realize that people make their choices. Everybody does what they do, naturally, you can’t step in and try to change it cause you’d be controlling them saying “Hey this, hey this.” Sometimes you’ve got to step back and let them make their choice and if their choice is to not do well in the class then it’s not my fault. If I did everything that I could do, it’s not my fault.

What is the main goal you want to see your students achieve?

Confidence is an important goal I want to see my students achieve. I want them to have enough confidence in themselves to be like “Hey, I can do this and it’s going to be okay.” My ultimate goal is to have them try acting, try to get up on the stage and use their voices. Acting did that for me, it built my confidence like now I can give back the wrong order and talk to people on the phone. Exploring is also a big thing. That’s why I picked the fall play that I did, cause I want them to explore different things from every culture and variety.

20 Questions with Orangewood High School’s English teacher Mrs. Lott

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

Kimberly Lott is an English teacher at Orangewood High School who is always welcoming to her students. She is known as someone who is real and honest with her students, in a way that is inspiring because she always stands in what she believes. She is unapologetically herself in the best way. Her efforts for students that are struggling don’t go unnoticed.

Q: What is your position or title? Pronouns? 

Kimberly Lott: English Teacher; she/her

Q: What are some of the classes you teach or main responsibilities with this position? 

Lott: I teach English 11 and English 12 as well as Advisory this year.  I have taught all four grades of English since I have been at OHS.  I have also taught English at the three middle school levels.  My favorite is English 12.How long have you worked in education? 24 yearsHave you held any jobs outside of education? Before I started teaching,  I worked as a teller at Bank of America; I also worked at Little Red School House which used to sell teacher supplies and a daycare with infants. I started teaching in 1998 at 23 years old.

Q: What led you to the position you are in today?  

Lott: A good friend taught at OHS and she convinced me to transfer over here.  She has since retired.

Q: What is one of your favorite parts of your job? 

Lott: My students.

Q: What is a challenging part of your job? 

Lott: My students. 🙂

Q: What is something others may not understand or know about who you are or what you do?

Lott: Students say I always look depressed, but I’m not.  That was the one good thing about masks; no one could tell if I was or wasn’t smiling under it.

Q: Who were early influences for you?

Lott: In high school, I was a TA in the library.  I got put in there because I was having a conflict with one of my teachers and that was the only place the counselor would move me.  I was so upset that I begged my parents to tell the counselor no and make her put me in another class because the librarian was so mean, but my parents said no.  It turned out to be the best part of high school.  I clicked with the librarian and we stayed in contact until she passed away.  She came to my graduation party and wedding.  Mrs. Carver taught me a lot and she had my back when I had another conflict in my senior year.  She is the reason I would love to be a high school librarian.

Q: Where did you grow up? What was life like then and there?

Lott: I grew up in San Bernardino.  My dad was raised there.  It used to be such a nice city, but that is no longer the case.

Q: What were you like as a teenager? 

Lott: A pain.  My parents would definitely agree with that.

Q: Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?  

Lott: Mrs. Carver-the librarian at San Bernardino High School and Mr. Tetlock at Golden Valley Middle School.  Mr. Tetlock introduced me to the game of basketball.

Q: Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today? 

Lott: I look back over my teaching career and I think how strict I was when I first started because I thought that was how I was supposed to teach.  I wasn’t flexible at all.  I have learned so much since coming to OHS that has impacted my teaching style.  I have learned respect goes both way. Sometimes the lesson just isn’t working and that is ok. You’re only as good as your word. The connection you make with your students is worth so much more than a grade. My students are worth fighting for.

Q: What advice would you give your teenage-self? 

Keep your mouth shut.  Once you say something, you can’t get it back.  And thank goodness there was no social media back then.

Q: Do you like to travel and What notable places have you visited? 

Lott: I have been to Mexico and Canada.  I have been to multiple states during my life.

Q: What music do you like?  

Lott: Country and early rap

Q: Would you be willing to share a little about your family and/or pets? 

Lott: I have two kids.  Emily is 21 and Justin is 18.  Both are currently in college.  My husband and I have been married for 24 years, but I have known him since I was a teenager.  He used to ride his bike down my street to visit his girlfriend and we became friends.  I have two dogs I adore–Rufus and Avery and a cat, Shadow, who doesn’t like me and that is just fine with me.

Q: Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share? What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

Lott: I enjoy camping, but haven’t done it in a long time.  I won’t camp in a tent and I don’t have an RV so that rarely happens.

Lott: What is a goal you have? 

Lott: I would really like to be a librarian at a high school or middle school.  It is scary to me because I have never tried that and, in the back of my head, I wonder what would I do if I did not like it and I couldn’t come back to OHS.

Q&A: Wildcat teacher Alexandria Driscoll talks new beginnings

By KENDRA BURDICK

Alexandria Driscoll is a new teacher to Redlands East Valley High School staff. Driscoll teaches Special Education English and tries to make a colourful and inspiring learning environment for her students. Driscoll answers some questions about herself and her career below. 

Why did you choose this course to teach?

I teach special ed and this was the opening that was here. My background is a little more in science but I thought that it’d be fun and I liked English a lot when I took it as a student.

Did you teach at any other schools before REV?

I taught at a school called Shandin Hills in San Bernardino. It’s a middle school and I taught science there.

 Why did you choose to teach at REV

I really wanted to be closer to home and closer to my daughter. I figured it was a good transition because I only live five minutes from here. I went to school in Redlands and I liked it a lot, so I thought it would be a good place to work.

 Why did you choose to become a teacher?

So, originally I studied child development and I liked it a lot. I liked learning how children grow and develop and it kind of got me into the whole ‘how children learn’ and so I was really interested in that. When I graduated from grad school, my friend and I were like “what should we do next” we didn’t really know. So, I kind of dragged her along with me to a credential program with me at the University of Redlands. We really liked it and honestly I’d say that my friend and I influenced each other and with the background in child development it was really easy to transition. 

If you could have been anything other than a teacher, what would you be?

Growing up, I really wanted to be a veterinarian at the zoo. But, that takes a lot of school. Science was not my strong suit growing up and definitely not going to the medical field. But if I could go back in time, I would just be taking care of a baby koala, just feeding it with a bottle.

What’s something that’s important to you?

I would say teaching in a way that’s inclusive for my students and making sure that they’re comfortable here and they feel like they’re represented. That’s my main goal here, even before I start teaching I make sure that this is a comfortable environment for them and that they feel when they’re here they won’t be judged. That they’re comfortable to discuss things here. That’s my main goal—to have inclusion in my classroom.

What’s something that you would like to tell students?

One, mainly for my students, is to not to give up because that’s life and it’s going to be really hard. If you give up the second there’s a struggle, you’re not going to, I think, make it in this world. I’d say, if you’re struggling and it’s hard just kind of push through the best that you can.

What school did you go to?

I started at RCC in Riverside and I got a couple of associates there then I transferred to Cal State. I got a bachelor’s and I stayed there for grad school and then I got a master’s in child development. Then, I went to the U of R and I got my credential there. 

What’s the biggest thing that you welcome into your classroom?

Difference of opinions. I tell my students if you don’t agree with what I’m saying, let’s discuss it. I really welcome an open discussion and that healthy disagreement as far as if you disagree then let’s talk about it.

Who got you to where you are now?

Mainly me because it was a lot of work. My family, they’re very supportive. Both of my parents didn’t really go to college so they didn’t really know how to help me. They were always like “She’s gonna do what she’s gonna do so we’ll just support her.” I’d say that my dad is a really big supporter of me, even if he doesn’t understand fully he’ll always agree with what path I choose.

Miss Driscoll has taught at Redlands East Valley High School for a year. (KENDRA BURDICK/Ethic News Photo)

20 Questions with Orangewood High School’s all-sport coach and teacher Mark Perkins

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

Many students have had Mark Perkins as a teacher or coach since they started at Orangewood High School and he’s always made them feel welcomed and acknowledged as students. He also motivates students to finish school and aim for success. Perkins is a favorite teacher for many students and plays a role as a model teacher at Orangewood.

Perkins, who is physical education teacher, coach of all four sports and athletic director at Orangewood, answers twenty questions about himself.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the Orangewood soccer team. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What is your position or title? Pronouns?

Mark Perkins: He, him and Mr.

Education

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, looks on as the soccer team practices at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What are some of the classes you teach or main responsibilities with this position?

Perkins: Athletics Director, Coach, PE teacher

Q: How long have you worked in education?

Perkins: 28 years

Q: Have you held any jobs outside of education?

Perkins: Not really, I have always been a teacher.

Q: What led you to the position you are in today?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a PE teacher, this was the spark that got me thinking about teaching P.E.

Q: What is one of your favorite parts of your job?

Perkins: Finding the students that are the diamonds but don’t know it yet!

Q: What is a challenging part of your job?

Perkins: The drama that the students have. It is hard to deal with every situation perfectly and drama complicates that.

Q: What is something others may not understand or know about who you are or what you do?

Perkins: I push students to be successful and sometimes that is misunderstood.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the boys and girls soccer teams at Orangewood. Perkins coaches all sports at Orangewood: basketball, soccer, volley ball and softball. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Growing up and Early Influences

Q: Where did you grow up? What was life like then and there?

Perkins: Ontario Canada is where I grew up. It is very green there and not very many people live there compared to the USA. So we have lots of country around us.

Q: What were you like as a teenager?

Perkins: I was really into sports and exercise, surprise surprise. 

Q: Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a P.E. teacher. When I was in the 8th grade I found out that in college you could go to school and be a P.E. teacher. I had no idea before that P.E. was a college degree.

Q: Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today?

Perkins: In college I took a job fishing in Alaska. My boat sank and I floated around in the ocean for seven hours until someone found my group.

Q: What advice would you give your teenage-self?

Perkins: I would tell me to not be afraid to share your emotions with the person you trust the most in life.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, stands by the field before a soccer match at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Mr. Perkins Today

Q: Do you like to travel? What notable places have you visited?

Perkins: I do like to travel. France, Switzerland, Germany, Italy are places in Europe I have visited.

Q: Which languages do you speak?

Perkins: I only speak English.

Q: What music do you like and do you play any instruments?

Perkins: 80’s Rock and when I was in high school I played the saxophone.

Q: Would you be willing to share a little about your family and/or pets?

Perkins: I have been married for 31 years and have two daughters, [ages] 21 and 24. Pets include two dogs, one Chihuahua mix — wife’s dog — and a purebred Dutch Shepherd — my dog.

Q: Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share?

Perkins: I love computers. I know how to use both PC and Mac computers. In addition to weight lifting, I also enjoy biking and the beach.

Q: What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

Perkins: I enjoy going to church, the beach, movies and hanging out with my friends.

Q: What is a goal you have?

Perkins: I want to travel more. Once my kids have both graduated from college, my wife and I want to see more countries of the world.

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat varsity tennis captain chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School varsity tennis captain Dorothy Clerk. Clerk shares laughs about her celebrity crush, pet peeves and where she will go after high school. As always, the Clerk answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Berkeley bound Wildcat chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School senior Arnie Corpus. Corpus responds to questions about his future at University of California, Berkley and on the badminton team winning first place in the Citrus Belt League this year. As always, Corpus answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Revealing the story on ‘Huggy Wuggy,’ children’s game character

By KENDRA BURDICK

“Huggy Wuggy” started out as a character for a children’s game rated for ages eight and above, but was recently updated to 12 and older due to concerns about disturbing uses of the character online.

Melonie Aunclair, a sixth grader attending Moore Middle School, says, “It’s hard to not think about your fears when toys around you remind you of them.” (KENDRA BURDICK/ Ethic News photo)

It all began with a horror PC game released in 2021 called “Poppy Playtime.” In this game, the player is investigating an old, abandoned toy factory and the objective is to retrieve VHS tapes and survive revengeful children’s toys.

Huggy Wuggy—a large creature with wide lips that showed rows of sharp teeth and bulging black eyes with long limbs— is the most recognized character from the video game. He’s a toy that follows the player around in the dark and getting caught by him means being eaten by his sharp teeth.

When the developers realized the amount of attention the character received from players, they converted the character into a children’s plush toy.

According to the news site “Parents,” the character’s high exposure resulted in “kids [who] were offering to hug classmates and whispering vulgar things in their ears and reenacting the game on the playground.”

Another place kids can get exposed to the character is through YouTube and TikTok. Deal Parochial Primary School fears the videos aren’t getting filtered because “Huggy Wuggy” doesn’t strike them as being a bad thing due to the name.

Some TikTok features make fan art with the game’s theme song, “Free Hugs,” in the background. However, other TikToks display images like Huggy Wuggy and his sharp teeth racing towards the camera.

Common Sense Media says, “While there’s no graphic violence or gore… the horror nature of the game will likely be too scary for younger audiences.”

A recently released statement by the Dorset Police Cyber Protection Officer warns parents that children may be viewing graphic fan-made videos that are popping up on platforms such as YouTube and TikTok.

“The manipulation of child-friendly items into threatening characters exploits the sense of security a child would feel around these things,” says Common Sense Media. “They may suddenly be terrified of something that had never been a worry before. Horror games could hamper that growth by creating unnecessary anxiety and stress.”

Children are exposed to the character through YouTube and TikTok, and children that get scared from the game, videos, and toys are prone to have problems, such as anxiety.

What had started as a PC game character turned out to be a character that many children fear.

Citrus Valley’s Lindsey Chau kicks off into a new season of her life

By JASMINE ROSALES

Lindsey Chau, a senior at Citrus Valley High School and girls varsity soccer captain, reflects on her time in high school as she prepares for the University of San Francisco with a Division I soccer scholarship.

 “My biggest accomplishment so far is either getting Offensive MVP for CBL for the second year in a row or getting Athlete of the Meet at CBL track finals,” Chau says. 

Lindsey Chau receives her Most Valued Player Award at the 2021-22 soccer season banquet. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

With her senior year coming to an end, it is bittersweet.

Chau says, “I’m going to miss my high school soccer team so much. I made some of my best friends and had an amazing time playing soccer. We’ve accomplished so much as a team so I’ll definitely miss that.”

Chau has also had an impact on the people she has crossed paths with.  

Ava Lopez, a sophomore at Citrus Valley says, “Lindsey is all around a great person and player. She genuinely cares about you whether it be on or off the field. She is so humble. She is truly a one of a kind player, teammate, and person.”

Natalie Thoe, a junior from Citrus Valley, shares, ”Lindsey is one of the most hardworking people I know. She is the definition of heart when it comes to anything. I’m so lucky to have had a chance to work with and learn from such a great player and I cannot wait to see what she does next.”

These past four years, including the COVID year, were tough on everyone. Chau admits that these past years have caused her to grow as a person. 

Chau says, “The past four years has allowed me to mature from a teenager into a young woman. I look at things in a more positive light and love to take on challenges.”

“Frankly, COVID took a huge toll on my life mentally and my junior year of high school was very hard,” says Chau. “Although I struggled, I was able to find a new version of myself that’s much stronger, open-minded, and excited to take on the world.”

Looking on the bright side in every situation, Chau pushed forward. 

Currently, her favorite hobbies include spending time with her boyfriend, hanging out with her friends, playing soccer and running track.

Chau’s overall goal in life is to run her own business, or become a professional soccer player for the National Women’s Soccer League. 

Taking possession of the ball, #10 Lindsey Chau drives the ball up the field. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

“My biggest role model is Pelé because he was a young teen from Brazil who didn’t come from much but was able to make it out and become one of the greatest soccer players of all time,” said Chau. He has such finesse and fire to him which makes him so admirable.”

Chau earned a Division I scholarship to the University of San Francisco. Before making a decision, Chau did her research on all her offers and USF had exactly what she wanted. The last step was to visit the campus and it sold her. 

Chau will be majoring in business analytics at USF and says she can’t wait for what the future holds.

Celebrating Mother’s Day at Citrus Valley: Students express appreciation for their moms on campus

By ETHIC NEWS STAFF

In honor of Mother’s Day on May 8, Citrus Valley High School students give appreciation to their mothers that work on campus. The following students responded to what they cherished about their mothers, what it is like to share a campus with their mother and if they had a message to say to their mothers.

Michelle Stover, chemistry teacher:

“I cherish her enthusiasm and care for her students.”

“It’s nice because I get snacks.”

“I love you mom.”

Michelle Stover is Citrus Valley’s General and Advanced Placement Chemistry teacher and her daughter Julianna is a sophomore at Citrus Valley. (Photo courtesy by Julianna Stover)

Kari Hill, Career Center Coordinator:

“I cherish how loving and helping she always is to me.”

“Having my mom on campus is the best because she can always give me advice where to go or what to do and help me with colleges.”

“A message I would like to give my mom would be thank you for everything you’ve done for me in the past 18 years. Now, I’m structuring a great future because of everything you’ve helped me understand and learn.”

– Ryan Hill, senior

Kari Hill is Citrus Valley’s Career Center Teacher/College-Career Counselor and her son is senior Ryan Hill. (Photo courtesy by Ryan Hill)

Kelly Teeter, counseling clerk:

“She’s really lovely, she takes care of me, she puts food on my plate, provides me with everything I need and she takes really good care of me.”

“For me, it’s nice because I’m diabetic so if something happens to me she’s there for me. She doesn’t have to worry so it’s nice for her too, and it’s just nice having her here.”

“Thank you, thank you for doing everything you do and thank you for being here.”

– Lucas Teeter, freshman

Kelly Teeter is a counseling clerk at Citrus Valley and her son is Citrus Valley freshman Lucas Teeter. (Photo courtesy by Lucas Teeter)

Maisie McCue, principal:

“I think that she is very empathetic and compassionate so she can help you through lots of stuff just because she’s able to relate.”

“It’s interesting but I’ve already had her on my campus for three years because she was my middle school principal also. But like, middle school was a little better than high school though. It’s still nice though, being able to see her every day at school.”

“Just that I love and appreciate you.”

– Kylie McCue, sophomore

Masie McCue is the principle of Citrus Valley, and her daughter is Citrus Valley sophomore Kylie McCue. (Photo courtesy by Kylie McCue)

Joan Snavely, telepresence paraprofessional aide:

“I cherish the fact that my mom is someone I can count on to be there for me.”

“Some people think having your mom on campus could be tiring, but its definitely made my high school experience easier. Whether it’s using her microwave for lunch or always having a classroom that I can feel safe in, she’s always been there for me.”

“Thanks for all the snacks during passing period, and bringing me a little bit of home while I’m in school.”

– Maggie Snavely, senior

Joan Snavely is the telepresence aide for Citrus Valley, and her daughter is Citrus Valley senior Maggie Snavely. (Photo courtesy by Maggie Snavely)

At Citrus Valley, these individuals take on the dual role of mother and staff member and this Mother’s Day their children’s appreciation for them does not go unnoticed.

Featured Photo: Ethic News thanks mothers everywhere. (Emily Walos/Ethic news image)

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Guadalajara native Dona Ayala chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Translated by DANIELA MORA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School Guadalajara native Dona Ayala. Ayala responds to questions in Spanish about her life inside and outside of school as well as maintaining her culture in America.  As always, Ayala answers fast, controversial “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

College Overview: Berkeley is divided to accommodate different majors of science

By MAURICIO PLIEGO

Basic:

The University of California, Berkeley, or UC Berkeley, is located in the Bay Area near San Francisco and it was founded on March 23, 1868. It is the state’s first land-grant university and the first campus of the University of California system.

According to its website, the University was “born out of a vision in the State Constitution of a university that would contribute even more than California’s gold to the glory and happiness of advancing generations.”

An image of the golden bear mascot of the University of California, Berkeley and its famous pose. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/ Ethic News)

Safety:

Compared to the average college campus across the country, Berkeley received a D+ based on on-campus, city, and regional crime rates according to the College Factual website. By calling 911, the UC Police Department responds to emergencies and provides programs such as the Community Service Officer program.

Tuition/budget:

According to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, the tuition cost for California residents is a total of $39,550 which includes the tuition, student health insurance plan, room and board, food, and books and supplies. Nonresidents must pay for everything listed prior, plus a $29,754 nonresident supplemental tuition, which is a total of $44,008.

Graduation and Acceptance Rates:

UC Berkeley is one of the most selective colleges in the country as it has a 17% acceptance rate. It has become more competitive each year and as of 2022, Berkeley may be forced to cut 3000 freshman seats according to the Los Angeles Times. College Simply reports that UC Berkeley has a 91.2% Graduation rate which puts it in the top five graduation rates in California, with the California Institute of Technology, Pomona College, and Stanford University ahead of it. 

Majors:

Berkeley has more than 130 academic and 80 interdisciplinary research departments separated into five colleges across one school.

  1. The College of Letters and Science is an intellectual adventure with a broad-based liberal arts education.
  1. The College of Chemistry offers courses in all fields of chemistry.
  1. Berkeley Engineering is a department known for its outstanding reputation and tradition of impacting teaching and research.
  1. College of Environmental Design involves programs in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban studies.
  1. The Haas School of Business offers courses to help understand the modern business world. This is the only college that only allows Junior year transfer students to attend.

Facilities and Amenities:

The campus itself has plenty to offer as it features three fitness and wellness centers, four swimming pools, five tennis courts, seven basketball courts, and an outdoor track and field. There are also two natural facilities such as the rope course within the redwood trees and the open waters of the Berkeley Marina.

Career Development and Services:

The UC Berkeley Career Center has plenty to offer as an organized website helps students by class, or population, and can help through jobs/internships, career planning, and getting involved in workshops and events.

Notable Alumni: 

Aaron Rodgers is the current Quarterback for the Green Bay Packers but he is also an alumni of UC Berkeley. He first attended Butte community college for about a year before transferring to Berkeley and becoming the starting quarterback and guiding the team through a 10-2 record.

Lights, camera, action: Wildcat and eAcademy performers collaborate on Spring Showcase

By ISAAC MEJIA

The Redlands East Valley High School theater department presented its Spring Showcase on Friday, March 11. While the department traditionally performs a musical in the spring, this year they decided on a showcase in which students were allowed to perform and collaborate on acts of their choosing. 

The show was also unique in that it was a collaboration between REV and Redlands eAcademy. REV is one of the Redlands Unified School District’s three comprehensive high schools. Redlands eAcademy is the district’s hybrid learning school which shares a campus with REV. Students from both schools worked together to put on the Spring Showcase.

The show consisted of many scenes from popular movies and tv shows including “Mean Girls” and “Victorious” as well as acts from acclaimed musicals such as “Hamilton” and “In the Heights.” 

“My favorite part has been working with my friends, and seeing how talented everyone is. Getting to act is amazing, but my favorite part [is] having fun with other actors,” said Connor Bromberger, a senior at REV. 

REV senior ​​Leilani Baldwin said, “The people are so supportive and loving. Needless to say, they are some of the most fun people I know.”

Many of these acts required students to work together creatively for weeks. 

Grace Castell, a senior at REV, said her favorite part about the showcase “has to be working with my friends. There’s never a dull moment with them.”

Bella Mia Fraley, a freshman at Redlands E-Academy said, “Being on stage, the lights, the sounds, it’s all so fun, and I hope I can do more productions with this school in the future.”

While preparing for the showcase was full of excitement, performers admit that the process was stressful at times. 

Nina Brown, a freshman at E-academy said, “The preparation process has been really stressful, but also really fun. It’s always fun to go to rehearsal and practice.”

Ella Fletcher, a senior at REV, said the showcase was “definitely a little stressful, but that is always a part of performing onstage because performers care so much that what you see onstage is as perfect as possible.”

(From left down to right down) Evie O’Brien, Lizeth Lopez, Rose Blatchley, Ella Fletcher, Dana Hatar and Megan Rimmer starred in Ex Wives from “Six” the musical. Their performance was the closing act of the night. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Junior Evie O’Brien (left) and senior Connor Bromberger (right) stand next to each other with weaponry during their portrayal of Henry vs his Demons. (ISAAC MEJIA/ Ethic News photo)

The actors and actresses of the showcase had their own unique individual experiences. Behind the scenes, the tech and stage crew had their own experiences as well.

eAcademy freshman Dakarai Marshall said “I have learned a lot more than I expected, such as using power tools. I have had fun learning these life lessons and skill sets that I will benefit from forever.”

Moments before the show, the cast sits around the set patiently waiting to be called by the tech crew for their last mic check. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Liliana Arroyo (left) and Lelanie Baldwin (right), two of the soloists of the night, pose for a picture outside of the theater room.  Arroyo performed “Hopelessly Devoted To You” from Grease while Baldwin performed “Breathe” from In the Heights. (ALISSON BERMUDEZ/ Ethic News photo)

(ISAAC MEJIA/ Ethic News video)

For some students, the Spring Showcase marked the beginning of their theatrical career at REV. However, for seniors, the showcase was the last time that they would set foot on the Blackstone Theater Stage and perform in front of a live audience.

Fletcher said, “I am happy to be a part of this production, but it is a little bittersweet. I do wish it was a full show though, but I’m happy to be involved!”

“It’s a surreal feeling to know this is the last time I will walk on and off of the Blackstone Theater stage as an attending REV student, ” said Baldwin. “I had grown so much in my craft in this very building.”

 “I do wish we could have done an actual play, but having the freedom to create a scene on our own is still just as great,” Catell said. “As long as I have fun and get to be with my friends, then I don’t mind! I will miss all the people I got to work with once I graduate though.”

Teacher Feature Q&A: 18 Questions with Citrus Valley’s Katie Mackenzie

By DESTINY RAMOS

Katie Mackenzie, a tenth grade honors English teacher at Citrus Valley High School, who is in her 18th year of teaching, answers 18 questions about herself.

Mrs. Mackenzie has been teaching for 18 years. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

Teaching Reflections

Q: How long have you been teaching?

Mackenzie: I think this is my 18 year of teaching.

Q: What is the nicest thing a student has done for you?

Mackenzie: Students are just very lovely. They write nice letters and say hello. Recently, my daughter’s student teacher was a former student and that was really fun to reconnect with him and he wrote me this really lovely letter where, in the end, he was complimenting my daughter but also complimenting me and saying that I inspired him to teach and that was really special. Especially since it’s so many years later. 

Q: What’s the most frustrating thing about teaching?

Mackenzie: I think it’s just things that are out of my control. Like the pandemic, it was really hard.

Q: Which of your lessons is your favorite to teach?

Mackenzie: I like teaching writing. I like after you guys have finished an essay, even though it’s kind of boring. I like going over it because I think it’s helpful. I like when it feels useful, like ‘okay we’re going to get better at this’ so I do actually like going over writing.

Q: What is your favorite thing about your students?

Mackenzie: I like the energy and I feel like sophomores, in particular, get happier as the year goes on. I like sophomores because they are funny and play a little bit and they aren’t too bogged down by stress quite yet, so I love that about them. I also like that they are open to sharing their ideas and they always have good insights that I don’t always think of and I really like learning from them.

Q: What is your favorite story you tell your students?

Mackenzie: I don’t like to talk about my life very much to my students. Like little things, but they’re often interested in how I met my husband and how I studies abroad and I do like to talk about how I studied abroad because it’s fun and it can inspire other kids to do that and I think that it was a really awesome experience but I tend to not talk about my personal life very much. 

Q: What is your favorite thing about teaching?

Mackenzie: I think it really is the connection with kids and getting to meet new people every year. It is interesting how we meet now but then sometimes I meet up with them much later and I do think that sometimes people come into your life when they’re supposed to and I feel lucky to get to meet all these different people and learn from them every year.

Other Favorites and One Pet Peeve

Q: When you aren’t teaching, what is your favorite thing to do?

Mackenzie: I like to hang out with my friends, I like to travel a lot. That’s probably my favorite thing to do actually. I love to travel.

Q: What’s your favorite place that you have been?

Mackenzie: So I studied abroad in Oxford, that’s where I met my husband, and while I was there I got to travel a bunch, and so we went to Prague and Scotland and France and all those places because it’s easy. And my husband’s from South Africa so I’ve been there and I really like South Africa and New Zealand, we’d go because it’s where his brothers live so I don’t know. I feel like I could live in New Zealand but I really liked Prague as a city.

Q: Who is your favorite author?

Mackenzie: Honestly Shakespeare. I know it’s lame but he is my favorite author.

Q: What is your favorite holiday?

Mackenzie: Christmas 

Q: What is your biggest pet peeve?

Mackenzie: I don’t like bad attitudes, like when people are grumpy all the time.

Fun Facts

Q:  If you never became a teacher what do you think you would have become?

Mackenzie: : I used to think it would have been fun to be a lawyer because I like to argue and because I like to think about stuff like that and I like to debate and I love lawyer shows but I don’t think I would have liked the lifestyle. But, I think I would have liked to be a lawyer.

Q: Are you a tea or coffee person?

Mackenzie: Tea

Q: What movie can you constantly watch and never get sick of?

Mackenzie: I really like the A&E miniseries Pride and Prejudice with Colin Firth as Mr. Darcey.

Q: What brightens your mood when you are having a bad day?

Mackenzie: My family, being with my daughter and husband makes me really happy.

Q: If you could live anywhere, where would it be and why?

Mackenzie: I think I would move to New Zealand. Of all the places I’ve visited, I think it’s the place where I would be the most happy living. It’s a little bit like Southern California because it’s coastal and it’s kind of metropolitan but there is a lot more open space and it’s very beautiful. 

Q: What was the last book you read?

Mackenzie: It’s from my book club. It’s kind of dark but it’s called ‘Deep Water.’

Lea este artículo en español aquí: https://ethic-news.org/2022/05/21/preguntas-y-respuestas-sobre-la-caracteristica-del-maestro-18-preguntas-con-katie-mackenzie-de-citrus-valley/

Seneca Village: Integration in the 1800’s

By ELIZABETH MOLLOY

Central Park is an American icon however the history of the park is not widely known. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News Photo)

When thinking about Central Park, one of the last things that come to mind is what was there before the park. The area where Central park is located was very rural considering most people lived in what is now lower Manhattan. 

With slavery ending in New York and European immigrants flocking to the city, there was a feud between free African-Americans and immigrants concerning jobs and housing. With a need for jobs for free people and a need for immigrants to get jobs, Lower Manhattan became violent. There were fights over jobs and homes so people decided to move upwards to start fresh. In the 1820s land started going up for sale in what was Seneca village. Andrew Williams, a shoe shiner,  bought three lots of land. After Williams bought the lots, other free people began to buy land and a community developed. According to www.centralparknyc.org  the land was being sold by John and Elizabeth Whitehead who owned all 200 lots of Seneca Village.  Moving out of lower Manhattan into the Village provided black families an affordable safe place. This was also the beginning of equal rights between people. In New York in the 1800s African-Americans could only vote if they owned land and by buying the affordable land in Seneca Village, they could vote. According to www.ny1.com, when Irish and German immigrants started to move uptown as well, they moved into the village. Seneca village was one of the first integrated communities with African-Americans and White people living together. The African Methodist Episcopal Zion church then bought several more lots and the church was founded then in 1821.

Over 30 years, the population in NYC quadrupled and the white “elite” believed that the island would be swallowed by development. In 1853 they called for a city park to be lungs for the booming city. Since most of the so-called elite were from Europe seeing the Champs Elysees, Kensington Park, and other such parks, they believed NYC should have the same.  750 acres were set aside to build this park and unfortunately, that included the community of Seneca Village. About 1,600 lost their homes since they lived among those 750 acres of land. The people who proposed the idea of a central park sugarcoated how people in Seneca village really lived, and not in a good way. They described the residents of Seneca village as living in “shanties & shacks”. They were calling it no man’s land, squatters village, and used other very derogatory terms. Although integration was starting, racism was still very much an issue. Seneca Village residents did what they could to salvage their land but nothing helped. 

The idea Seneca Village was a poor ‘shack’ village was just not true. In 2011, a team of archaeologists excavated the area where the village was located between 82nd-89th street. They had 250 bags of objects to analyze, the bags are now located in NYC’s Archaeological Repository.  By analyzing the objects, it was found that Seneca Village was more wealthy than it was assumed to be. Comparing artifacts from Seneca Village and Greenwich Village, which was an upper-middle-class neighborhood, it was found they had many similarities. Ironstone plates, porcelain, a comb, a smoking pipe, a roasting pan, and part of what used to be a toothbrush were found. The toothbrush was not common among the middle class until the 1920s. From records, it was found there was a high level of education in the village.

Seneca Village was not filled with poor people living in shacks, it was an upper-middle-class neighborhood and an educated integrated community. But to the elite, it was nothing to save. Residents filed objections against the forced removal but that didn’t help. Seneca Village residents as well as the other 1,344 people that lived on that land, had their homes seized. The neighborhoods were destroyed and pathways, bridges, arches, and thousands of trees replaced them. Central Park was finally done and Seneca village was no longer.

New York is finally acknowledging this history. A temporary exhibition with plaques of information was set up in the park. “Land, property ownership…that’s how you get wealth and you pass wealth on from generation to generation…but when a new highway needs to be built the bulldozer comes in, Seneca Village was no different,” says Cynthia Copeland, a public historian. 

The key takeaway is although Central Park is an American icon and NYC wouldn’t be the same without it, we still need to recognize the history and what was there before the park. Although the park is a beautiful piece of nature tucked away in one of the largest cities in the world, the way it was created was not. People lost homes, jobs, and their safe places to create this park. This history needs to be recognized, or else history repeats itself. Because it’s not African-American history or integration history, it’s American history.

In the heart of Redlands: The Kimberly Crest House

By ELIZABETH MOLLOY

A drawing of the historical Kimberly Crest House located in Redlands. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News)

In search of places with deep history, local places don’t usually come to mind. Downtown Redlands or the Smiley Library might stand out, however, there are plenty of hidden tokens of history around Redlands. 

The Kimberly Crest House is one of many. The Kimberly Crest House and Gardens were built in 1897 by Cornelia Hill. The house is built on six acres of property and was originally built without the Gardens. The Gardens were added by the second owners, John Alfred & Helen Cheney Kimberly, in 1909. After the death of Kimberly, Mary Kimberly Shirk inherited the house. 

Shirk was an advocate for women’s education and her mother was an avid supporter of The Women’s Club Movement. Shirk’s father was a founder of the Kimberly-Clark Paper Company. Today, the company manufactures paper products as well as medical instruments. 

The inspiration for the house was a French castle that Hill had visited. The specific architecture the house is based on is French Chateau architecture. French Chateau architecture showcases a type of home inspired by French country homes, specifically built in the Loire Valley. These houses have asymmetrical plans with ornate and complicated roofs and facades. 

According to the CityOfRedlands.org, most of the inspiration for the home is French, the Gardens were added in 1909 with the Italian Renaissance architecture in mind. The Gardens include ponds, fountains, rose gardens, plenty of trees, and more. 

 According to KimberlyCrest.org, the house is a Petite Chateau with 22 rooms and 7,000 square feet. The house consists of three stories: the first floor was used for greeting and entertaining guests, the second floor was a personal floor used strictly for the family, and the third floor has another bedroom and a screened porch. The porch was used most likely during the summertime. Part of the third floor was sectioned off as the servants’ quarters that also included a separate bathroom. 

The house has an attic and basement but these cannot be accessed on a public tour. A separate carriage house was built for the horses and carriages that the Kimberly family-owned with an extra bedroom inside for the horse caretaker. 

Today, the house is open to private and public tours. Weddings, baby showers, bridal showers, birthday parties, memorial services and luncheons are also held at the house.

East Valley’s new Maker Lab encourages creative skills

By CYRUS ENGELSMAN

Sophomore Deacon Carreon stares at a sign made by the librarians that says, “THE LAB”.  Each letter of the sign is meant to represent a different piece of technology available for students to use in the Maker Lab at Redlands East Valley High School. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)  

The Redlands East Valley High School has had a few recent additions on campus, renovating and updating the library, including a new Maker Lab.  

The Maker Lab is a new area filled with technology to help benefit and to inspire creative passion for students.  The Lab is managed by head librarian Korrie Krohne, who was excited to finally be able to show off the Maker Lab.

The Lab is equipped with sewing machines, cricket machines, arts and crafts supplies, fifteen cameras, and 3D printers and scanners.  

The new Maker Lab had been in preparation and construction stages since 2019 and had it soft opening in the Fall of 2021 with a few events.

Krohne said, “I am so thrilled to have the space available to students. When we came back from Winter Break this year, all the scaffolding and other parts of the renovation were out of the way, and we can now use the lab the way it was meant to be used.”

Redlands East Valley High School junior Josh Burdick adds strings to a face mask he recently created in the new Maker Lab in the school’s media center as Korrie Krohne, teacher-librarian, guides him and other students.  Adding strings is one of the final steps of the face mask making process.   (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

To counteract large amounts of students from overcrowding the area, students have to sign up in advance to use the lab.  There are a variety of ways to sign up for the maker lab: the library tab on the schools webpage can bring up a form for personal projects, teachers can sign up the entire class to do a lab, and the librarian-led labs that students can sign up for.  

Librarian-led labs can be a variety of activities. The first of which was face mask making, students from all grades came together to create their own masks to make and keep.  When the second librarian-led lab was announced in December of 2021, students created their own Christmas ornaments.

Senior Amira Carthell sews her face mask together with the help of librarians at Redlands East Valley High School. This is the first step to the face mask making process.   (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Krohne plans to have many more maker lab events in the future.

“I intend to run labs using the different lab equipment both after school and during lunch,” said Krohne. “Additionally, starting in the month of March, I plan on opening the lab one day a week during lunch time to support what people need–if they are working on a project they can come up on that day and use supplies available to them in the lab.”

Korrie Krohne, head librarian at Redlands East Valley High School, demonstrates how to use a sewing machine to the participating students.  The machines were used for students to sew face masks together and take home.  (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/ Ethic News photo)

Teacher feature Q&A: 15 questions with Citrus Valley’s Shannon Rooney

By NADIA CENICEROS

Shannon Rooney, an advanced placement and honors biology teacher at Citrus Valley High School, in her 28th year of teaching, answers 15 questions about herself.

Mrs.Rooney has been a teacher for 28 years (Jasmine Rosales/Ethic News Photo)

Teaching Reflections

Q: Is there anything that you wish you’d known when you were a first-year teacher?

Rooney: I wish I knew that it was OK to be friendly and chat with students. I was afraid to be a person that first year and I had a lot of classroom discipline problems as a result.

Q: In your opinion, what is the best part of teaching?

Rooney: I love watching my students grow and decide what they want to do when they graduate from high school.

Q: What is the most frustrating thing about teaching?

Rooney: The state is constantly changing the responsibilities placed on schools. It is hard for all of us to keep up; classified, teachers and administrators. That or the lack of cell service in the E building.

Q: If you never became a teacher, what do you think your other job would be?

Rooney: I would probably have been a veterinarian.

Q: Who inspired you most to become a biology teacher?

Rooney: It’s a tie: My 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Fields or Mr. Rooney (Shannon Rooney’s husband, Rob Rooney, also teaches AP Physics at Citrus Valley High School).

Q: What is the most difficult topic that you have taught your students?

Rooney: Gene Regulation is very complicated. Students must work hard to understand how most cells contain the same DNA, but cells use that DNA differently.

Favorites and pet peeve

Q: What is your favorite life story you tell your students?

Rooney: I did not intend to be a teacher. After I graduated with my Bio degree, I was a substitute teacher at Colton High School. I was subbing in a biology classroom, and I was having a great time answering genetics questions. Long story short, Colton High offered me a job. 28 years later and here I am, still teaching high school Biology. I love my job. Keep your options open, try different things, you never know where one of those choices will take you.

Question: What is your favorite lesson to teach in biology? (In AP or Honors Biology)

Rooney: The Bacterial Transformation lab in AP Biology. We insert a gene into a bacterium, and it produces a blue pigment.

Q: What is your favorite thing about your students?

Rooney: I just enjoy chatting with my students. Teenagers are full of energy.

Q: When you are not teaching, what are your favorite activities to do?

Rooney: Reading, walking with Ozzy (my dog) and Mr. Rooney or Pilates

Q: What is your favorite thing in your classroom?

Rooney: The University and Navy Pennants that represent each of my family members.

Q: What is your biggest pet peeve?

Rooney: I dislike when someone asks a question, and another person makes a comment that makes the other person feel bad for asking.

Fun Facts

Q: Are you more of a coffee person or a tea person?

Rooney: Tea

Q: What is that one movie you can constantly watch and never get bored of?

Rooney: Inception

Q: What brings your mood up when you are down?

Rooney: Chatting with my daughters, talking to my students or playing with Ozzy (my dog).

Video: 50 Questions with Ethic – Wildcat Key Club president chats candidly

Interviewed by MAURICIO PLIEGO

Filmed by ELLA FITZPATRICK and DANIELA MORA

Directed by ISAAC MEJIA

Come join Ethic News as they interview Redlands East Valley High School Key Club President Audrey Yoh. Yoh responds to questions about how she balances taking all AP classes while also being a varsity athlete and what her future plans are after high school. As always, Yoh answers fast, controverisal “this or that” questions at the end of the interview.

Orangewood staff share Valentine’s Day memories

By ANGELINE ASATOURIAN

We asked five staff members at Orangewood High School what their most memorable Valentine’s Day has been. 

Karen Wilson is an OHS government teacher and coordinator for the Orientation Assessment Study Skills Insight Success program, better known by OHS students and staff as OASIS. Wilson said, ”My best V-day memory was finding out I was pregnant with my first baby in 2000.”

Bob Blank, OHS English teacher, shared that his first Valentine’s Day being married was the best. Unfortunately, his wife was sick and they did not have a lot of money. So being a newly-wed husband, he went out and bought her a big red teddy bear. She was very surprised and 20 years later, she still has it. 

Hand-drawn and colored Valentine’s cards. (AYEISHA FORDHAM and EMILEE WALTERS COOK/ Ethic News art)

Don’t forget to get Lou Ann Perry a Valentine’s Day card. Perry is the OHS English teacher and coordinator for the Advancement Via Individual Determination program. When she was in the second grade, Perry had filled out all of her Valentine’s cards to pass out to her classmates the night before and went to bed excited for the next day to come. Unfortunately for her, she woke up with the mumps, and could not go to school for a week. Perry never got her Valentine’s cards and candy from second grade. This “Single’s Awareness Day,” as Perry likes to call it, she would like to share the late great cartoonist Charles Shchult’z words, “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” 

Carli Norris, OHS principal, said that when she was in the third grade, her class had made the little Valentine envelopes and put them on their desks. She remembers taking them home after receiving them from her friends and classmates to open them. The candy that came with them was a plus.

Tito Costakes, OHS independent studies teacher, on the other hand, doesn’t really have any good or bad memories of Valentine’s Day. He just misses the days where he was single, playing golf and not having to spend a lot of money on a fancy dinner and fancy presents. 

Thank you to all the teachers and staff members for sharing their memories and stories.

Meet Redlands East Valley new counselor, Arline Troncoza

By SPENCER MOORE

Arline Troncoza is the newest addition to Redlands East Valley High School counseling staff. Troncoza is just like a regular counselor; however, she specializes in helping freshman students acclimate to the high school experience as they transition from middle school distance learning that occurred over the 2019-2020 and the 2020-2021 school years. 

The freshman Counselor Arline Troncoza smiles for a photo. (SPENCER MOORE/ Ethic News photo).

Troncoza says, “Typically, freshmen are mixed into the alpha for all counselors. But, this year because they have a single counselor assigned just to them, they are able to receive more one-on-one support.”

Troncoza says that she wants “to provide as much support as possible to ease the transition.” 

Troncoza would like the students at REV to know that she was the first person in her family to attend college, earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology at California State University, San Bernardino. 

Troncoza further cemented her place in her family legacy by being the first person to also attend and complete a master’s degree, continuing her education at California State University, San Bernardino.

As a student, Troncoza was very introverted and didn’t ask for help because she didn’t feel that there was any for her. 

As the new freshman counselor, she plans to help students who possibly feel the same way as she did to be as successful as possible. She plans to do this by being available for her students’ needs including social, academic or even if they just need someone to talk to. 

“This is my passion, being a counselor is not just a job for me, it’s something that I love to do, and I’m here for the students who need me,’’ Troncoza says.

Troncoza further details efforts that the counseling department has put in place for this new, post-distance learning Class of 2025, saying, “The goal is to be a bit more preventative to prepare them for the next three years, so we are doing whole class presentations and academic interventions for those who are struggling with grades.”

“I try to put myself in their shoes, and try to share similar struggles that I had when I was a student, to let them know that they are not alone, and that it is possible to get past the obstacles that they may be going through,” Troncoza says. 

One piece of advice that Troncoza thinks that every freshman would benefit from hearing and adhering to is “to not be afraid to ask for help.”

Troncoza says, “This is a new phase of your life, and high school is very different from middle school, so if one is struggling, ask us for help, ask us to teach you what we don’t know.”

Arline Troncoza is here for every freshman that may need her, and she wants everyone on campus to know that the counseling department is there for them, no matter what their need may require.

Citrus Valley spirit week leads up to Winter Rally

By NADIA CENICEROS and ELIZABETH MOLLOY 

Citrus Valley High School had a ‘CV Gets Trendy’ Spirit Week leading up to the winter rally. Citrus Valley students were encouraged to participate in this Spirit Week as a way to get excited for the upcoming Winter Rally.

Monday Jan. 24: Material Girl Monday (Dress in your best attire)

Jasmine Gurrola, Amaya Pantaleon, Lailyenna Ngo, Soriah Brunson, Natlie Velasquez, Emma Irene, Annabell Crummey and Nickolas Ramirez showed off their best attire. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Tuesday Jan. 25: I Wanna be a Cowboy Baby

Michael Okere and Amber Sibbett give a thumbs up for Cowboy Day. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Edith Gomez, Alexa Cano and Brooke Mendez smile for a picture dressed as cowgirls. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Angela Dov and Alexa Gonzales pose as cowgirls. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Wednesday Jan. 26: Anything but a backpack day

Alexa Gonzales poses with her toy shopping cart. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Erik Serenson holds a canvas bag for Anything But A Backpack Day. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Bailey Sacco decided to utilize a Home Depot bucket while Brooke Mendez used a PlayMate cooler instead of their backpack. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Angel Leon uses a cardboard box for her take on Anything But A Backpack Day. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Natalia Contreras shows off with a Lightning McQueen buggy on Jan. 26. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Thursday, Jan. 27: The Man, The Myth, The Legend (Dress like Adam Sandlar)

Natalia Contreras and Emma Vara showing off their best ‘Adam Sandler’ attire on Jan. 27. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

Arianna Rodriguez poses for Adam Sandler Day on Jan. 27. (ELIZABETH MOLLOY/Ethic News photo)

College Overview: New York University equates to Ivy League status

By MAURICIO PLIEGO

NYU mascot Bobcat holding the Statue of Liberty’s torch. (NADIA CENICEROS/Ethic News art)

New York University is a private, non-profit, research four-year university that was chartered in 1831 by the New York Legislature led by Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin. According to the College Gazette, NYU is not categorized as an Ivy League school, however, due to the high prestige within the academic, research and athletic programs it has made it to be widely considered to be equal to any of the six schools within the league. 

Size:

Located in lower Manhattan, the urban campus is near Union Square and Greenwich Village and is one of the three largest landowners in New York City with it being 230 acres, triple the size of Columbia University. It also has a second campus near Brooklyn and has two other campuses around the world in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai.

Time Square, a famous tourist destination located in the center of New  York City and is known for the New Year’s Celebration and the billboards across multiple buildings within the major commercial intersection. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Safety:

Crime rates within the area are known to be fairly low. Any crimes committed in the area of Greenwich Village are recorded in a Daily Crime Log located in the NYU Department of Campus Safety.

Tuition:

The tuition as of 2018 has been $77,632, which includes costs for books, on-campus room and board. Through aid given from the institution, state and or the federal government it can decrease to $39,772 and the tuition can decrease even further depending on household income and if New York is the applicant’s resident state. 

Graduation and Acceptance Rates:

According to College Simply, NYU has an acceptance rate of 21% making it one of the most selective schools in the nation as it is very likely that most of those who are accepted have high SAT and ACT scores, however, currently it is a test-optional school. This means that upon applying, it is not necessary to show them your scores. The graduation rate is 83% which is still higher than most, but it is low compared to other Ivy colleges, such as Harvard with a 97.6%

Majors:

The University offers over 143 distinct undergraduate degrees that are concentrated into 94 majors and 25 broad fields of study. Majors such as Visual and Performing Arts, Social Sciences and Liberal Arts and Sciences are the most popular among students. 

Facilities and Amenities:

The campus itself has plenty to offer as it features various athletic facilities such as an eight-lane swimming pool, weight room, state-of-the-art aerobic fitness room, climbing wall, basketball courts, dance and class space, pro shop and a snack bar. There is the Office of Global Services that handles any immigration matters for students and the NYU Box Office which offers discounted tickets for movies, broadway shows, sporting events and musical concerts. The campus offers areas to make students feel included such as the NYU LGBTQ+ center and the NYU Center for Multicultural Education and programs.

Career Development and Services:

Another facility on the campus is the Wasserman Center for Career Development, which allows students to use a variety of resources and services like a step-by-step process that involves mock interviews, workshops and on-campus recruitment opportunities. 

There is the NYU Handshake website that helps students to find internships and jobs on and off campus which has helped students to receive job offers after graduation. 

Notable Alumni: 

Elizabeth Olsen is a famous actress known for her role within the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Scarlet Witch or Wanda Maximoff. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, California and graduated from NYU in 2007 with a degree in acting.

Q & A: Sheriff Grant inspires Orangewood students, speaks from experience

By DEBBIE DIAZ

Photos by ALEXIS GARCIA

Officer Otis Grant, From the Riverside Sheriff’s Department, came to speak with students from Kimberly Lott’s classroom at Orangewood High School on Oct. 5. 

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department speaks to the Orangewood High School class of Kimberly Lott, Language Arts teacher, on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DEBBIE DIAZ: Okay, This is Officer Grant, Sheriff’s Department Riverside, right? Okay, and your first question, can you describe a very distressing situation in which you remained calm and collected?


OFFICER OTIS GRANT:  I’ll probably have to say, sometimes when you come across people with mental conditions, they don’t comprehend exactly what you’re trying to ask of them, so sometimes you have to slow things down and you have to really explain things to them thing to them, like you’re talking to a child. Sometimes you have to raise your voice at them to find a way to communicate with people; different people in different ways. Some people you have to be very calm and talk low too, and some people you gotta get into their head, you gotta find out what they’re thinking, and that’s why you have to just, you know, to get what we call compliance.

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department is interviewed by Orangewood High School senior and Ethic journalist, Debbie Diaz, on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DIAZ: Okay, and then you had said previously that you wanted to be a police officer since you were young — six years old. Did anyone influence you?

GRANT: So I grew up in San Bernardino, and I remember one day, my father and I were out in the backyard, and one of my father’s friend with a police officer, he came by the house. We were talking on the roadway and got a hot call and as we were talking, what they call a priority call comes out, and the police officer took off and he was running with his lights and sirens and everything. And at that moment, I remember thinking, “Wow, that’s what I wanna do with my life. I know it.” It just hit me right then and there, I knew what I wanted to do in my life, and that was my defining moment. It was weird because I said I was five, six years old at that time. And fast forward, maybe 20 something years down the road, I went on a ride along with the San Bernardino Police Department, and I come across this guy and he doesn’t recognize… Because I was a lot older then, and I introduced myself to him and he was like, “You’re little Otis.” And I was like, “Yeah.” And I said, “Do you remember that day that you met me and my dad out in the backyard?” 

He was like, “I do remember that day.” He was like, “You were a little guy.” And I said, “Did you know that that encounter was the reason why I’m here today?” And he shook my hand and he hugged me. He was like, “Are you saying I did that for you?” And I was like, “That’s what you did for me,” and I was like, “I can’t thank you enough.” And it was a very proud moment in his career, but I know he never thought that he would have or someone like that, and it was that I got to meet the person who really opened my eyes to law enforcement.

Officer Otis Grant from the Riverside Sheriff’s Department answers student questions after speaking to an English class at Orangewood High School on Oct. 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of Alexis Garcia.

DIAZ: Right. Oh, that’s beautiful. Okay, now we’re gonna switch up to tobacco industry. Okay, how do you think your has affected students today… What’s that? The tobacco industry, how do you think it has affected students today?

GRANT: The tobacco industry has, it’s hurting kids because you have kids using these vape pens, you have kids that are putting chemicals in their bodies that they don’t really… No one really knows exactly what’s in these things, and they’re making kids addicted. The kids are getting addicted to these things it’s messing with their mental health and that’s with them addicted physically.. You’re seeing he is… When I worked in Heritage High School, we were getting kids once or twice a day that we’re passing out or bring found unconscious, I should say, whether it be in classrooms, the bathrooms, the PE area, and we would ask them what was the last thing that you remember doing it was like, Oh, I was going to vape pen, and you’re taking something that was marijuana, and then you’re making into a chemical form… Well, no one knows what chemicals are being used to break down the THC level… The THC levels now, and I don’t really know what they are, but the THC levels now that they’re using in vape pens and marijuana these days are a lot higher than what it was in the 60s, in the 70s, and that’s what’s really affecting people.