Dragons compete in their first flag football tournament

By VINCENT CASTRO

“Expect the unexpected,” said senior Jordan Beccera, starting cornerback for the Orangewood High School Dragons flag football team.

For the first time in district history, according to Orangewood coach Mark Perkins, there was a flag football tournament for continuation high schools in the area.   

The games were played at the outdoor football field in Central City Park in Fontana on Oct. 26.

The Orangewood Dragons were coached by Perkins and Orangewood engineering teacher Matthew Stewart. 

“I was very proud of how the athletes participated and I couldn’t have done it without Mr. Stewart,” said Perkins.

In the game of flag football, it is a seven on seven. Each game is four quarters long and each quarter is 15 minutes long.  Each school that attends the tournament is guaranteed three games.  The three games are to consider where they stand in the bracket for playoffs. 

The Orangewood flag football team went into the tournament with only five weeks of practice. Practices were held everyday at lunch on the soccer field.

The Dragons played their first game against Birch High School from Fontana. When going against Birch, Orangewood never let go of the lead and proceeded to win the game 27-14.

“Winning feels better when it’s earned,” said senior Samuel Bahena, starting rusher. 

The second game of the tournament for the Dragons was against Sierra High School from San Bernardino. The Dragons lost to Sierra 26-12.  

Orangewood had a third game against Slover and took the win 30-16, sending them to the championship game against Sierra. 

In the championship game it was a back and forth between touchdowns until Orangewood got intercepted and scored on, losing the game by four, 28-24.  

“We failed, but we will be back,” said junior Jeremy Zaragoza, starting wide receiver. 

The Orangewood High School flag football team with coaches Matthew Stewart (top left) and Mark Perkins (top right). “We are not a team because we work together, we are a team because we work and respect each other,” said junior Jesus Arana, defensive captain. (Photo courtesy of Orangewood High School principal Carli Norris)

Correction: The original posting of this article stated two weeks of practice. It has been corrected to state five weeks of practice. Nov. 18, 2022 6:30 pm.

Timeline: Brooklyn Nets player Kyrie Irving may soon return from suspension over anti-semitic post

By JUSTEN NGUYEN

  • Oct. 26

    In a since-deleted tweet, NBA Brooklyn Nets player Kyrie Irving posted a link about a 2018 anti-semitic film “Hebrews to Negreos: Wake Up Black America.”  

  • Oct. 28

    Owner of the Brooklyn Nets Joe Tsai posted on twitter, “I’m disappointed that Kyrie appears to support a film based on a book full of antisemitic disinformation.” 

    Tsai said that Irving’s anti-semitic comments were unprofessional and should have real repercussions. 

  • Oct. 29

    Irving stated at an Oct. 29 press conference, “I’m only going to get stronger because I’m not alone,” along with, “I have a whole army around me.”

    He also tweeted that the anti-semitic labels of him are not justified.

  • Nov. 3

    Irving’s Nov. 3 suspension was originally only for five games, but Irving refused to apologize for his comments and found himself suspended indefinitely. 

  • Nov. 3

    Irving posted an apology on instagram on Nov. 3 after the announcement of his suspension.

  • Nov. 4

    Nike announced on Nov. 4 that they will be ending their partnership with Irving and will stop all production and remove all models of Irving’s shoes from store shelves. 

    Although Nike and Irving recently released Irving’s eighth signature shoe, it will no longer be sold.

  • Nov. 5

    According to Shams Charanie of the Athletic, the Nets established six requirements for Irving’s return.

  • Nov. 16

    As of Nov. 16, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnaroski reported that sources indicate that Irving is nearing completion of the Nets’ requirements.

  • Nov. 20

    According to reports, Irving may return for the Nets home game against the Memphis Grizzlies on Nov. 20.

Redlands High School Terriers win the 25th annual Smudge Pot

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

The annual Redlands Smudge Pot took place on Oct. 20, which ended with the Terriers taking back the Smudge Pot trophy. 

During the first quarter, the Wildcats had the first score of the game which was a touchdown but a missed kick with one minute and 57 seconds left. Being the only score of the quarter, it ended with a score of 6-0 with the Wildcats in the lead. 

By nine minutes and 37 seconds left of the second quarter, Redlands High School’s first score of the game occurred; a touchdown and successful kick. Ending this quarter with a score of 6-7 with the Terriers in the lead.

Throughout the game, cheers and jeers could be heard from both the Wildcats and Terriers. When it was the third quarter and the Terriers were leading by a point, the student section for RHS, the Boneyard, cheered “Why so quiet?”

Once with 10 minutes and three seconds and the second occurring with nine minutes and 48 seconds left in the third quarter, there were two false alarms that the REV had scored a touchdown. Just five seconds later, there was an attempted touchdown by the Wildcats, but the Terriers intercepted the Wildcats’ pass.

In the third quarter with two minutes and four seconds left, REV scored a touchdown and instead of going for a kick, the Wildcats attempted another touchdown to no avail. This ended the third quarter with a score of 12-7 with the Wildcats in the lead.

In the fourth quarter, the pace quickly picked up with the Wildcats scoring a touchdown and kicking successfully. Then with the Terriers simply scoring a touchdown making the score 19-13 with the Wildcats holding on to the lead. 

With barely two minutes left on the clock of the fourth quarter, RHS managed to score a touchdown and a kick garnering them seven points which put them in the lead by only one point. After getting one down and with only twenty seconds left, the Wildcats unfortunately were not able to make up for the loss, leading the Terriers to win the 25th annual Smudge Pot. 

The final score of the game was 19-20 with the Redlands High School Terriers winning the 25th annual Smudge Pot game.

On Oct. 20 2022 for the annual Redlands Smudge Pot, Wildcat cheerleaders lined up along the sideline for the national anthem. The Wildcat cheerleaders helped in keeping student motivation up throughout the game. For this Smudge Pot game, REV was the home team, but because of the continued construction on the Wildcat stadium, home games for the Wildcats’ 2022-2023 year of football were held at Citrus Valley High School. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)
Before the annual Redlands Smudge Pot started on Oct. 20 2022, the Wildcat cheerleaders hold a sign that says, “Hey Terriers better luck next time #smudgepotstays[home].” Immediately afterwards, the varsity Wildcat football team ran through the sign passionately and ready to take the Terriers on in the infamous rivalry. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)
The Wildcats varsity football team celebrates their first score of the game on Oct. 20, 2022 for the Redlands annual Smudge Pot game held in the Ted Runner Stadium at Citrus Valley High School. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)
Wildcat senior Carissa Perez is performing a solo on her clarinet during the Wildcats’ marching band performance for the halftime show of the annual Redlands Smudge Pot game on Oct. 20 2022. For the halftime show of the Smudge Pot game, the Wildcat marching band performed all three parts of their program for the crowd. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)
The Wildcat song team performed for the halftime show of the annual Redlands Smudge Pot game on Oct. 20, 2022. Unlike cheerleaders, song leaders focus more on hip hop, jazz, and more dance aspects of performance. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)

On Oct. 20, 2022 in the Citrus Valley High School Stadium at the end of the annual Redlands Smudge Pot game, the Redlands High School Terriers triumphantly take the smudge pot trophy back to the crowd full of Terrier fans. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News Photo)

Orangewood boys softball team works hard and plays hard

By BRIANNA SHIRLEY and VINCENT CASTRO 

“Work hard, play hard and you will succeed,” says junior Jeremy Zaragoza, who plays left field for the Orangewood High School boys softball team. 

The Orangewood Dragons took their fourth win of the season at home against Citrus High School on Friday, Sept. 30.  The Dragons were down in the second inning by ten runs.  They ended up overcoming and scored a consistent 19 runs against Citrus.  The Dragons upset Citrus with a score of 19-16.

The Dragons took their fifth win against the undefeated team from Sierra High School on Wednesday, Oct. 6.  The Dragons took the lead in the first inning going up 5-0. The game ended with a Dragon victory with a score of 13-10.

If you ask the players on the team what’s the secret to their success, they talk about their close-knit team.

“We are not a team because we work together, we are a team because we respect, trust, and care for eachother,” says Orangewood junior Jesus Arana, who plays center left field.  

“Even though we may argue and yell at each other, we are still a good team and we are close like family,” says Orangewood senior Nick Boiarski, who plays right field. 

“We play as one and we win as one,” senior Samuel Bahena, who plays pitcher.  

According to Orangewood senior Alex Sanchez,  “We the best team in years.”

The Orangewood team played Glen View High School and went head to head till Glen View hit a walk-off double to seal the game 19-18 giving Orangewood a loss.

Orangewood boys softball team made it to the playoffs this season. They played against Val Verde and was devastated 18-6 being first round exits.

Senior Andrew Gonzalez, senior Sol Ramirez and junior Jeremy Zaragoza jog off the Orangewood High School softball field. This was after the second inning the boys were coming in from getting three straight outs against Slover high school on Sept. 14. (Brianna Shirley/ Ethic News photo)

Orangewood High School seniors Alex Sanchez, Jose Hernandez and Nicholas Boilarski celebrate taking a win against Citrus High School on Sept. 30. (Brianna Shirley/ Ethic News photo)

Pictured from left to right: Orangewood High School Senior Ivan Navarro, senior Sol Ramirez, senior David Garcia, senior Victor Garcia, senior Axel Gonzalez, senior Samuel Bahena, senior Andrew Gonzalez, junior Jesus Arana, senior Nicholas Boiarski, senior Jose Hernandez, senior Alex Sanchez, and junior Chase Bass. The team watches the Dragon girls softball team compete at Orangewood High School. (Ethic news photo)

Pictured from left to right: Senior Adrian Marroquin, senior Jose Hernandez, senior Giovanni Galvan, senior and team manager Jennifer Castro, senior Axel Gonzalez, senior David Garcia, senior Vincent Castro, senior Alex Sanchez, senior Azariah Williams, junior Jeremy Zaragoza, senior Sol Ramirez, junior Chase Bass, senior Jack Bryan, senior Andrew Rosas, senior Nicholas Boiarski, and coach Mark Perkins. The team took a win against Slover High School on Sept. 14. (Brianna Shirley/ Ethic News photo)

Las Vegas Raiders host 2022 NFL Draft

By DESTINY RAMOS

During the last weekend of April, the Las Vegas Raiders hosted the 2022 NFL draft; however, the city offered much more than just the draft. The three-day weekend included games, meet and greets, obstacle courses, viewings of Super Bowl trophies and rings and much more, all free of cost. The NFL promises “to go all out to make this event the biggest and best” of them all for the very first “Vegas-style Draft.” News officials described the experience as “promising” and as a weekend “that everyone will remember.”


Right next to the draft experience was the main stage of the event where the draft picks were first announced to the public and live TV that was “105 feet wide and 280 feet long” according to NFL officials. Celebrities such as Donny Osmund, Ed Marinaro, Emmit Smith, Marcus Allen, Wayne Newton and many more made special appearances to announce their favorite teams’ new additions. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News Photo)

The main events were held behind the Las Vegas strip, notably behind the Flamingo, Harrah’s, Linq, and Cromwell hotels, where there are usually empty parking lots. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

The Vince Lombardi Trophy for Super Bowl XI, usually held for display at Allegiant Stadium, that the Raiders won against the Vikings on Jan. 9 of 1977. The trophies from Super Bowls XI, XV and XVIII that the Raiders have won over the years were displayed for all to view and take pictures with. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News Photo)

In front of the main stage, the NFL hosted their usual talk show that was broadcasted on live television. This was not the only set up throughout the experience, as two more stages were set up throughout the experience filled with many different NFL TV personalities. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

The Hall of Fame was home to many interesting finds, including the display of football players’ lockers and their personal items. Derek Carr, Raiders’ quarterback of 5 years, had his personal jerseys, helmet, cleats, sneakers, and clothing on display. He was not the only one, as all other football quarterbacks’ belongings were displayed as well along with other NFL legends. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

In that same Hall of Fame, crystal-studded helmets of every NFL team were displayed along with the locker view of different teams’ players. The helmets were designed by Quinn Gregory with the jewelry company, Swarovski, with all 12,500 crystals being hand-applied and costing just over $1800 each. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News Photo)

In the Hall of Fame, seven of the most well-known NFL players and coaches are on display from the Pro Football Hall of Fame location in Canton, Ohio. The wall above displays John Madden on the middle top, Tom Flores on the top left, Peyton Manning on the bottom left, Charles Woodson on the top right, Howie Long on the bottom right, Tim Brown on the bottom, and Marcus Allen in the center. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News Photo)

This Lamar Hunt Trophy was first awarded to the Miami Dolphins as the winner of the AFC championship game in the 1984-85 NFL playoffs and has since been awarded to the winners year after year. As of Jan. 30, 2022, the Cincinnati Bengals are the proud holders of the trophy after winning the AFC championship game against the Chiefs and advancing to Super Bowl LVI. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

Designed by Riddell, these are roughly 72 Metallic Chrome helmets on display from the Chrome Alternate Collection. These are collectable helmets and can be found in NFL shops around the country. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

The 40-Yard Dash was where up to three people can test how fast they run compared to an NFL player. The player would run alongside the runner through the screen which would describe how fast the runner and player ran. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

In this field, parents could sign their kids up for a thirty minute training session with volunteer coaches and play a few rounds of flag football afterwards. During the training session, kids of all ages would learn to tackle, throw and catch footballs and how to play flag football. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

The streamers lounge gave video gamers and football fans alike a chance to play the game Madden 2022 on the Xboxes offered. This lounge was also used as an area for attendees and volunteers to cool off from the Nevada heat. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News Photo)

The Draft Set was a photo opportunity with their teams in the background and the ability to hold a number one jersey of the team of their choice. There were two jerseys of all 32 NFL teams. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

Meet and greets with many NFL players and coaches were offered, free of cost. Maxx Crosby, Raiders defensive end, made an appearance for a Q&A and a meet and greet with his fans on Saturday, Apr. 29. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic New photo)

After the draft concluded for the day, Ice Cube held a post-draft concert for attendees. He was one of the three artists, Weezer and Marshmello being the other two, who held post-draft concerts. (DESTINY RAMOS/Ethic News photo)

20 Questions with Orangewood High School’s all-sport coach and teacher Mark Perkins

By JOCELYN GOMEZ

Many students have had Mark Perkins as a teacher or coach since they started at Orangewood High School and he’s always made them feel welcomed and acknowledged as students. He also motivates students to finish school and aim for success. Perkins is a favorite teacher for many students and plays a role as a model teacher at Orangewood.

Perkins, who is physical education teacher, coach of all four sports and athletic director at Orangewood, answers twenty questions about himself.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the Orangewood soccer team. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What is your position or title? Pronouns?

Mark Perkins: He, him and Mr.

Education

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, looks on as the soccer team practices at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Q: What are some of the classes you teach or main responsibilities with this position?

Perkins: Athletics Director, Coach, PE teacher

Q: How long have you worked in education?

Perkins: 28 years

Q: Have you held any jobs outside of education?

Perkins: Not really, I have always been a teacher.

Q: What led you to the position you are in today?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a PE teacher, this was the spark that got me thinking about teaching P.E.

Q: What is one of your favorite parts of your job?

Perkins: Finding the students that are the diamonds but don’t know it yet!

Q: What is a challenging part of your job?

Perkins: The drama that the students have. It is hard to deal with every situation perfectly and drama complicates that.

Q: What is something others may not understand or know about who you are or what you do?

Perkins: I push students to be successful and sometimes that is misunderstood.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, huddles with members of the boys and girls soccer teams at Orangewood. Perkins coaches all sports at Orangewood: basketball, soccer, volley ball and softball. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Growing up and Early Influences

Q: Where did you grow up? What was life like then and there?

Perkins: Ontario Canada is where I grew up. It is very green there and not very many people live there compared to the USA. So we have lots of country around us.

Q: What were you like as a teenager?

Perkins: I was really into sports and exercise, surprise surprise. 

Q: Did you have any mentors or role models growing up? How did they influence you?

Perkins: I had an uncle that was a P.E. teacher. When I was in the 8th grade I found out that in college you could go to school and be a P.E. teacher. I had no idea before that P.E. was a college degree.

Q: Is there an experience or event that had a major influence on who or where you are today?

Perkins: In college I took a job fishing in Alaska. My boat sank and I floated around in the ocean for seven hours until someone found my group.

Q: What advice would you give your teenage-self?

Perkins: I would tell me to not be afraid to share your emotions with the person you trust the most in life.

Mark Perkins, Orangewood High School physical education teacher and coach, stands by the field before a soccer match at Orangewood. (JOCELYN GOMEZ/ Ethic News photo)

Mr. Perkins Today

Q: Do you like to travel? What notable places have you visited?

Perkins: I do like to travel. France, Switzerland, Germany, Italy are places in Europe I have visited.

Q: Which languages do you speak?

Perkins: I only speak English.

Q: What music do you like and do you play any instruments?

Perkins: 80’s Rock and when I was in high school I played the saxophone.

Q: Would you be willing to share a little about your family and/or pets?

Perkins: I have been married for 31 years and have two daughters, [ages] 21 and 24. Pets include two dogs, one Chihuahua mix — wife’s dog — and a purebred Dutch Shepherd — my dog.

Q: Do you have skills, interests or hobbies that you would like to share?

Perkins: I love computers. I know how to use both PC and Mac computers. In addition to weight lifting, I also enjoy biking and the beach.

Q: What do you enjoy doing most with family and friends?

Perkins: I enjoy going to church, the beach, movies and hanging out with my friends.

Q: What is a goal you have?

Perkins: I want to travel more. Once my kids have both graduated from college, my wife and I want to see more countries of the world.

Redlands Educational Partnership hosts basketball fundraiser with Harlem Wizards in Wildcat Gym

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

“A high-flying, slam dunking, rim-rattling basketball show is coming to town!” said the email sent to Redlands East Valley High School students the day before the Harlem Wizards basketball game.

In an effort to raise funds for the Redlands Education Partnership, REP hosted the Harlem Wizards for a fun and friendly game of basketball versus Redlands Unified School District staff on Friday, April 22 at the Wildcat Gym.

Both sides of the gym were packed with students, family, and staff members from the various Redlands schools including Franklin Elementary School, Crafton Elementary School, Kimberly Elementary School, Redlands High School and REV.

“It was fun for the kids,” said REV senior Arnie James Corpus. “[The Wizards] got the crowd going and I think people who came got a good show.”

Hailing from Fairfield, New Jersey, the Harlem Wizards, not to be confused with the Harlem Globetrotters despite both teams’ similar comical antics, was originally found by Howie Davis who had “a passion for the merger of sports and entertainment,” according to the Harlem Wizards website, and have five different team units: Broadway  Unit, Showtime Unit, Swoop Unit, Rocket Unit, and Assembly and Special Events Unit.

For the REP game, the crowd saw the Broadway Unit of the Harlem Wizards which included Eric “Broadway” Jones, Arnold “A-Train” Bernard, Devon “Livewire” Curry, Lloyd “Loonatik” Clinton and Leon “Space Jam” Sewell.

The players who played on behalf of the REP Rebounders were Redlands teachers, classified employees and administrators. The team captain was RUSD Superintendent Mauricio Arellano. Bill Berich, REV history teacher and recently retired head basketball coach, was the coach for the REP Rebounders.

“My favorite moments of the game were watching the staff and the Wizards play, but also, honestly and most important, was just seeing those faces in the crowd having a good time,” said Sabrina Thunderface Mercado, AP Secretary from Cope Middle School, who was the shortest player on the team at 4 feet and 11 inches. 

Mercado says she volunteered to play because she “thought it would be fun for my 19-year-old son to see his Mom out on the court playing ball with The Harlem Wizards. He loves basketball.” 

(MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News visual)

The referees of the game included Redlands East Valley High School’s new athletic director, Chad Blatchley. Brandon Ford, sociology and career foundations teacher and softball coach, Ted Ducey, badminton coach and earth science teacher and Ryan Parson, teacher, also represented REV. RHS Advanced Placement Teacher and Volleyball Coach Nathan Smith joined the high school teacher players.

“The game itself was a lot of fun and I hope it raised a lot of money,” said Smith, “I would play it again.”

Middle school staff players were Mercado, TeAnna Bermudez and Kiele Pratt from Cope and Matthew Villalva from Moore.

“Joining in on the fun, especially after the last few years we’ve had, where people couldn’t hang out with each other, students weren’t in school like normal. It was great to have some normalcy return to us all,” said Mercado.

Elementary schools staff players included Jennie Dyerly from Crafton, Jeff Stamners from Cram, and Natalie Wood from Judson and Brown, Carolyn Bradshaw from Kimberly, Scott Ferguson from Lugonia, John Smith from from McKinley, Damion Sinor from Mentone and Jeff Doolittle from Mission. Franklin Elementary had Rebecca Acosta, Erick Nowak, Katy Swift, Leah Timpe and Alexis Padilla participating in the game.

Numerous sponsors supported the game including Pacific Dermatology Institute, Redlands Police Officers Association, Redlands Community Hospital, Maupin Physical Advisors, Welsh Insurance Services, Neal and Joyce Waner, Holiday Inn Express, Trader Joe’s and Chick-fil-A.

As soon as one team got the lead, the other managed to tie the game again, but despite this pattern throughout the majority of the game, the Harlem Wizards left the Wildcat gym triumphant.
The Redlands Educational Partnership website  has more information on their programs and donations.

Before the game started, Jamel “The Voice” Thompson, brought by the Harlem Wizards, played music to hype up players and audience members. Thompson and Redlands East Valley High School announcer Kirk Escher watch the Harlem Wizards warmup. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Teachers from some of Redlands’ elementary schools took part in the game, and mascots from Cope middle school and Clement middle school stood in front of the crowd while watching the court. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

The REP team is seen standing in a line while high-fiving their coach Bill Berich as he runs past them with his name being announced. Berich is retiring this year from being Redlands East Valley High School’s boys’ varsity basketball coach. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Both the REP Rebounders and the Harlem Wizards leave the Redlands East Valley High School basketball court while waving to the fans. The game ended with the Harlem Wizards magically winning. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Chad Blatchley, one of the referees of the game and Redlands East Valley High School’s athletic director, watches the game as the bleachers are packed with families, students, and staff. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

With the Harlem Wizards already having a lead of eight points, their player Devon “Livewire” Curry attempted a backwards half court shot, and when the ball fell in the hoop, the players and crowd alike erupted into cheers. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

Both the REP Rebounders and the Harlem Wizards leave the Redlands East Valley High School basketball court while waving to the fans. The game ended with the Harlem Wizards magically winning. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Citrus Valley’s Lindsey Chau kicks off into a new season of her life

By JASMINE ROSALES

Lindsey Chau, a senior at Citrus Valley High School and girls varsity soccer captain, reflects on her time in high school as she prepares for the University of San Francisco with a Division I soccer scholarship.

 “My biggest accomplishment so far is either getting Offensive MVP for CBL for the second year in a row or getting Athlete of the Meet at CBL track finals,” Chau says. 

Lindsey Chau receives her Most Valued Player Award at the 2021-22 soccer season banquet. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

With her senior year coming to an end, it is bittersweet.

Chau says, “I’m going to miss my high school soccer team so much. I made some of my best friends and had an amazing time playing soccer. We’ve accomplished so much as a team so I’ll definitely miss that.”

Chau has also had an impact on the people she has crossed paths with.  

Ava Lopez, a sophomore at Citrus Valley says, “Lindsey is all around a great person and player. She genuinely cares about you whether it be on or off the field. She is so humble. She is truly a one of a kind player, teammate, and person.”

Natalie Thoe, a junior from Citrus Valley, shares, ”Lindsey is one of the most hardworking people I know. She is the definition of heart when it comes to anything. I’m so lucky to have had a chance to work with and learn from such a great player and I cannot wait to see what she does next.”

These past four years, including the COVID year, were tough on everyone. Chau admits that these past years have caused her to grow as a person. 

Chau says, “The past four years has allowed me to mature from a teenager into a young woman. I look at things in a more positive light and love to take on challenges.”

“Frankly, COVID took a huge toll on my life mentally and my junior year of high school was very hard,” says Chau. “Although I struggled, I was able to find a new version of myself that’s much stronger, open-minded, and excited to take on the world.”

Looking on the bright side in every situation, Chau pushed forward. 

Currently, her favorite hobbies include spending time with her boyfriend, hanging out with her friends, playing soccer and running track.

Chau’s overall goal in life is to run her own business, or become a professional soccer player for the National Women’s Soccer League. 

Taking possession of the ball, #10 Lindsey Chau drives the ball up the field. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

“My biggest role model is Pelé because he was a young teen from Brazil who didn’t come from much but was able to make it out and become one of the greatest soccer players of all time,” said Chau. He has such finesse and fire to him which makes him so admirable.”

Chau earned a Division I scholarship to the University of San Francisco. Before making a decision, Chau did her research on all her offers and USF had exactly what she wanted. The last step was to visit the campus and it sold her. 

Chau will be majoring in business analytics at USF and says she can’t wait for what the future holds.

Redlands East Valley High School boys basketball coach Bill Berich retires

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS and MAURICIO PLIEGO

Bill Berich has been involved in education for 41 years and has been a teacher and coach at Redlands East Valley since its opening in 1997.

Berich says, “I wanted to get back into coaching high school basketball – and REV was opening up so I applied.”

In an away game against the Redlands High School boys varsity basketball team, Redlands East Valley High School boys’ varsity basketball coach Bill Berich dismisses his team from a timeout. The end of the game resulted in a win for the Wildcats. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

He taught at Yucaipa Junior High for two years, 13 years in Yucaipa High School, and 25 years at REV. Berich has taught social studies, physical education, health, English and science classes over the course of his career along with coaching basketball and several other sports. 

Berich says, “I have so much fun teaching. I am not the best teacher, but I doubt anyone enjoys it as much as I do. I like helping kids [who want to be helped] and seeing them succeed.”

 “I have so much fun teaching. I am not the best teacher, but I doubt anyone enjoys it as much as I do.”

Bill Berich, Redlands East Valley High School Head Boys Basketball Coach

Head coach Bill Berich (far right) watches his team rejoicing as Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick and junior Jeremiah Bolaños jump with enthusiasm after winning their final CBL game of the 2021-22 basketball season in an overtime clinch. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Berich has coached basketball for 43 years and that has included six years in freshman basketball, seven seasons as the head boys’ varsity coach from 1986-1993, four seasons as assistant coach at the University of Redlands from 1993-1997 and has been head coach at REV since 1997.

Along with basketball, he has coached for softball, golf, track, junior varsity softball and badminton.

During his time as a coach at REV, basketball has won four Kiwanis Tournaments, two Beaumont Tournaments, four Citrus Belt League and several other tournaments. Since REV’s opening in 1997, the team has qualified for the California Interscholastic Federation playoffs for 20 out of the 25 years.

Redlands East Valley High School boys’ varsity basketball coach Bill Berich stands on the sideline during the first and last CIF game for the Wildcats of the 2021-2022 season on Feb. 11, 2022. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As coach, Berich can think of two memories that he can say were his favorites but he cannot choose a favorite season.

He says, “CIF Finals at the Honda Center in 2015. Winning a game in the State Tournament.  Our first CBL Title.  But, maybe above all of that, was the retirement send-off I was given at our last home game on February 4, 2022. That was amazing.”

Over the years, he has grown to love the students, faculty and everyone who works at REV. Berich feels it has “become infectious” and feels blessed to have taught at REV.

Coach Berich speaks to the Redlands Educational Partnership Rebounders team in hopes to lead them through the game against the comedic, traveling basketball team the Harlem Wizards. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As the coach for the REP Rebounders, Bill Berich talks to his team of Redlands’ teachers, classified employees and administrators before they begin their fundraising basketball game against the comedic basketball team the Harlem Wizards on April 22, 2022. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The only thing he would change is to hold the students to a higher standard regarding attendance, academics and behavior because he feels that it would be possible to do.

Berich lives by the Golden Rule, and he believes that students should know that “what is popular is not always right, and what is right is not always popular.”

He says, “I try to treat people the way I would like to be treated. I try to do my best and take satisfaction in that regardless of the results.”

During his free time, he golfs, fishes, and takes care of his disabled son, Billy. For his retirement, he hopes to be able to teach at a junior college, or community college, and continue fishing, golfing, and boating.

Originally an assistant coach to Berich, Head Coach Mike Aranda has coached REV basketball since the 1999-2000 season.

 “He has worked very hard over the years to build up the REV basketball program. We’ve won CBL titles, preseason tournaments, a state playoff game, and reached the CIF Final in 2015,”  says Aranda. “He cares deeply about his players but not just in regard to their basketball abilities, he wants his players to be successful in all aspects of life. He’s taught his players about responsibility, work ethic, and accountability to prepare them for their lives after their basketball career is over.”

Aranda says, “I am very thankful to Coach Berich for his help and guidance in my coaching and teaching career.”

Season recap: Blackhawk girl soccer are three-peat league champs

By JASMINE ROSALES

Citrus Valley High School’s girls’ varsity soccer team circle up and begin their cheer to pump each other up before kickoff (Courtesy of Mike Mccue)

Since Dec. 1, 2021, the soccer season at Citrus Valley High School has been underway. From preseason to league, the soccer girls have worked hard during their practices. From 6 a.m. to after school practices, they are dedicated to crushing every game.

At the beginning of the league, the varsity team felt they had a target on their back after being the top team in their district and back-to-back Citrus Belt League champions. Starting off with preseason, everyone worked on strengthening weak points. 

The first league game for Citrus Valley was Jan. 5 at Cajon High School. The Blackhawks came out strong with a win of 7-1. With another away game against Redlands East Valley High School on Jan. 7, the team again took the win against the Wildcats with a 3-0 victory. 

The third game of the league and the first home game of the season was against their rival Yucaipa High School. The Thunderbirds and Blackhawks battle it out on the pitch. Citrus Valley comes out hard from the start and wins the game against YHS 3-1 with a goal from Blackhawk senior Lindsey Chau, junior Natalie Thoe and sophomore Sasha Mezcua. 

After their third consecutive win, varsity girls made their way to Terrier town against Redlands High School. Working together, the Blackhawks scores ten goals on the scoreboard and earns a final score of 10-1.

Teammates No. 10 Lindsey Chau, No. 15 Vanessa Alcala celebrate with No. 8 Elizabeth Northcott after scoring a goal against the Terriers. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

The team followed up with a home game against Beaumont, finishing against the Cougars with a win of 3-1. Wrapping up the first round of games, Citrus Valley girl’s varsity held a streak of five wins. 

Round two brought each team head-to-head one more time, starting from the top Citrus Valley had a home game against Cajon. Cajon comes in strong while Citrus Valley matches up and plays strategically. Through teamwork, they came out on top and beat the Cowgirls 2-1.

The following week, Citrus Valley went head-to-head against the Wildcats on Wednesday Jan. 26. The teams battles it out and approximately 80 minutes later, the Blackhawks are victorious beating REV 3-0. Shutting out the Wildcats and keeping their league record undefeated. 

With a challenging game ahead of them, Assistant Varsity Coach Allen Thoe said, “We used our recordings of the games and watch the film before practice. We mainly use this to devise what system we will be using, in this case, we went with a 4-3-3, but we also use it to highlight any specific players to watch out for.” 

After filming and taking note of what needs to be brought to attention, the team traveled to Yucaipa. The girls warmed up and got pumped up for the game. With a hard battle from both defenses and shots on goal from offense, Citrus Valley kicked five goals into the back of the net. Pushing through and using their studying from the previous practice, the girls find the weak points and use it to their advantage to break through and win against the Thunderbirds for the second time this season with a final score of 5-1. 

With only two games left of CBL, the varsity girls gave it their all when they went up against Redlands High School. The Blackhawks started strong in Hodges stadium a little before 5 p.m with warm ups, followed up with shots on goal and long kicks from defenders. Leaving everything on the field, the game finished up with a final score of 3-0, Blackhawks with the win. 

In the final league game, the players took the bus and enjoyed the ride to Beaumont to face the Cougars. The whistle was blown and the girls on the sidelines ran to cheer with the players on the field as they celebrate their win of 3-0 and their record of ten wins and zero losses. 

With an undefeated season, the girls and the seniors celebrated all their hard work as undefeated league champs for the past three consecutive years. 

The varsity girls pose with coach Norma Mendez after their last Citrus Belt League game. (Courtesy of Hung Chau)

Photos: Wildcat varsity girls’ basketball loses in second round of CIF playoffs

By MIA ARANDA

Redlands East Valley High School’s varsity girls’ basketball team lost to Louisville High School 43-56 in the second round of CIF Southern Section Division 3A playoffs in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16.

By halftime, REV was losing 18-26 and was able to narrow the gap further by the end of the third quarter with a score of 32-38.

However, Wildcat junior and starter Shaelyn McClain was substituted by senior Carly Copeland following an injury in the fourth quarter. McClain had a total of 13 points for the Wildcats during the game.

Louisville High School, a private, Catholic school in Woodland Hills, has an overall basketball record of 16-5 now. They advanced to the quarterfinals against San Marcos High School at LHS on Feb. 19 and lost 50-49.

This was the first time REV’s girls’ basketball team had qualified for playoffs since 2017. They qualified for Division 1A playoffs, but the team lost to La Cañada High School in the first round.

This year, the Wildcats had a league record of 5-5.

“The team showed huge improvements starting our league season and had to beat a very competitive Cajon squad to qualify this year,” said REV varsity girls’ basketball head coach Robert Tompkins. “That was a big win for us.”

REV senior Ebonny Staten, who had been on the varsity team since her freshman year, and freshman Ci’ella Pickett were attributed by Tompkins as being some of the team’s greatest strengths for having advanced to the second round. In addition, junior Myla Gibson’s improvement at the post also helped the team considerably.

“I am very proud of this team and what they achieved this season. They were able to turn a ‘rebuilding’ year into a successful CIF qualifying run,” said Tompkins.

Tompkins continues, “We set our goals preseason as making the playoffs, we exceed that goal by not only qualifying, but also reaching the second round.”

Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook makes a 2-pointer while being guarded by Redlands East Valley High School junior Shaelyn McClain during the first quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom attempts a 3-pointer during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten drives to the basket and makes a 2-pointer during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Louisville High School freshman Eva Van Lokeren guards Redlands East Valley High School junior Shaelyn McClain during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom attempts a layup while being guarded by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten looks for a teammate to pass to while being guarded by Louisville High School freshman Talya Sepand  during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez and other players watch Lopez’s 2-point shot go in during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16.  (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Leah Kibrom looks to pass to teammate Ebonny Staten while being double-teamed by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook and junior Stevie Carmona during the second quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten looks to pass to a teammate while being guarded by Louisville High School sophomore Miye Kodama during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez is eventually blocked by Louisville High School freshman Ava Van Lokeren when she attempts to go up for a 2-pointer during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Ebonny Staten is fouled by Louisville High School sophomore Taylor Westbrook with six seconds left in the third quarter on Feb. 16 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alyssa Lopez is double teamed by Louisville High School senior Katherine Csiszar and sophomore Taylor Westbrook during the third quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Following a shot attempt from Louisville High School, LHS freshman Ava Van Lokeren catches the rebound amid pressure from Redlands East Valley High School during the fourth quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Louisville High School sophomore Miye Kodoma attempts a layup during the fourth quarter in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 16. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Who is playing in Super Bowl LVI

By CRAIG MORRISON

Sunday was an intense round for the Conference Championships with both games coming down to the wire and leaving many fans breathless.  

In the Cincinnati Bengals vs. Kansas Chiefs game, the Bengals managed to comeback from an 18 point deficit at halftime to beat the Chiefs 27-24 in overtime by a field goal kick. 

Image of the Sofi Stadium that the Bengals will meet the Rams in for the Super Bowl. 70,000 spectators will gather to watch this nail-biting game. “SoFi Stadium June 26, 2020” by Don Norris- is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

In the Los Angeles Rams vs. San Francisco 49ers game, the Rams scored a field goal kick to win over the 49ers in a 20-17 game.

This means that the Rams will play the Bengals in Super Bowl LVI on Feb. 13, 2022 at 3:30 p.m. PST at the SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, CA.

This will be the first Super Bowl appearance since the 1988 season for the Bengals, and this could be their first-ever Super Bowl win, which would be a notable accomplishment for Joe Burrow, the Bengals quarterback, in only his second year in the NFL. 

The Rams have won one other Super Bowl in their team history in the 2000 season, and they have been to the Super Bowl four times previously. 

The halftime show for the 2022 Super Bowl is an electrifying show that millions of people tune in each year. This year, it will feature Kendrick Lamar, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem and Mary J. Blige. 

Online viewers can tune in to NBC to watch the Super Bowl LVI. 

Photos: Wildcat coach’s last league game ends with overtime win against Thunderbirds

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS 

The Redlands East Valley High School Wildcats had their final game of the Citrus Belt League on Friday, Feb. 4 versus the Yucaipa High School Thunderbirds. This was also the boys varsity basketball annual Senior Night and the final CBL home game coached by the Wildcat’s head coach Bill Berich.

Pre-game

Before the game, announcer Kirk Escher told the audience that “Coach Berich is retiring from teaching and coaching at the end of this year after 42 years in education.”

“It is fitting that we honor him tonight as we host Yucaipa High School, where Bill began his teaching and coaching career in the Inland Empire,” said Escher.

Berich has been REV’s only head boys basketball coach since the school opened in 1997.

The pre-game speeches started with a few words by Berich, saying “This is senior night and maybe one senior citizen night,” with laughs from the crowd.

He then spoke about how thankful he was for being involved in the basketball program at REV and the announcement of the eight REV seniors that were being celebrated on Senior Night.

Before the athletes began their warmup and after the crowd had settled down from the junior varsity game, the final game of the Citrus Belt League started with a few words from Redlands East Valley High School head coach Bill Berich. REV Athletic Director Chad Blatchley and REV ASB Advisor Matt Fashempour also made brief speeches in honor of Berich. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

During Wildcats head boys’ basketball coach’s speech before the game at Redlands East Valley High School on Feb. 4, the boys’ varsity basketball team wait in anticipation for the game to begin. Seniors sat closest to Berich with the younger players sitting near the end of the bench. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Bill Berich hugs his son, Adam Berich, also Wildcat alum, after his family surprised him on the court before the game on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

As a gift to Berich, the Wildcat Associated Student Body presented him with a banner that listed his years and accomplishments as head coach of boys’ basketball at Redlands East Valley High School. He is accompanied by his family and REV seniors are also accompanied by their families on the baseline. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

As a surprise, Berich’s daughter and Wildcat alum, Carly Berich-Brunjes, sang the Star Spangled Banner, with the audience, referees, players and coaches standing respectfully. After this, the final Citrus Belt League game for Redlands East Valley High School and Yucaipa High School began. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The Wildcat Gym was decorated with posters of the Redlands East Valley High School seniors for Senior Night on Friday, Feb. 4. Top: Posters of seniors Arnie James Corpus, Piave Fitzpatrick, Luke Mathis and Jaydin Hardy. Bottom: Posters of seniors Jacob Watson, Justin Mills, Aram Bangou and Jacob Zelaya (right).  (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photos)

Game time

The final CBL game of the 2021-23 season started with the Thunderbirds gaining first possession.

The Thunderbirds’ Nathan Hernandez at 6’5 and the Wildcats’ Jacob Zelaya at 6’2 went for the jump ball to begin the game. After the referee had tossed up the ball, Hernandez tipped the ball and gave Yucaipa the first possession of the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Luke Mathis is guarded in the corner by Yucaipa High School senior point guard Joshua Macias in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Alfred Lee looks for someone to pass to while being guarded by Yucaipa High School senior Matthew Selbert on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Yucaipa High School senior J.D. Shah, junior Nathan Hernandez and sophomore Tristan Doty and Redlands East Valley High School Piave Fitzpatrick rebound for the ball after a free throw shot in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Jeremiah Bolanos attempts a two-pointer against Yucaipa High School senior Mitchell Hendrickson in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

By the end of the first half, the Thunderbirds had a lead with 36 points and eight fouls with the Wildcats down by eight points with 28 points and 10 fouls. It looked bleak for the Wildcats, but the Litter Box continued to encourage their team.

The varsity cheer squad of Redlands East Valley attended Senior Night and sat by the sideline while still cheering. During halftime, they made three pyramids which resulted in cheers and applause from the crowd. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/Ethic News photo)

The home side stands were packed with athletes’ family and friends, as well as former co-coaches and players of retiring head coach Bill Berich as he coached his last league game. Cheers from the crowd shifted into more quiet tension as the game progressed and neither team was consistently dominating. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Fourth quarter proved to be a challenging for both teams.

At eight minutes in the fourth quarter, Yucaipa was still in the lead with 56 points and REV with 51 points, but because Yucaipa had six fouls and REV had only one, if the Wildcats continued to drive into the Thunderbird’s defense, they could garner enough fouls to get into the bonus and shoot free throws to gain more points to chip away at the deficit.

At five minutes and two seconds left in the fourth quarter, REV and Yucaipa were at a tie of 56 points, but Yucaipa had seven fouls and REV had two fouls. Another tie was hit with three minutes and 59 seconds of the fourth quarter with both teams at 58 points.

The Thunderbirds managed to break away by leading with two points at three minutes and 48 seconds left of the fourth quarter, and Yucaipa gained two more points by two minutes and 57 seconds.

With only two minutes and 7 seconds left of the fourth quarter, Yucaipa was in the lead 64-58 with five fouls for the Wildcats and seven fouls for Yucaipa which made REV in the bonus.

The Thunderbird’s continued this lead even into one minute and seven seconds left of the fourth quarter, but this time, both teams were in the bonus. If either team hoped to win, they would have to minimize their fouls and attempt drawing fouls from the opposing team.

Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick, who plays forward, catches a rebound while on offense on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Luke Mathis prepares to receive a pass from junior Malachi Williams on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Malachi Williams jumps to catch a rebound while on offense on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw attempts a lay up during the second half of the game against Yucaipa on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

At one minute left in the fourth quarter, Yucaipa continued to lead REV by five points with 64 points on the scoreboard.

At 45.4 seconds left of the fourth quarter REV was down by two points with 62 points and Yucaipa still at 64 points. The Wildcats had managed to stop the ball movement for the Thunderbirds and score.

This continued until there was 14.4 seconds left and REV tied the game at 64 points. REV maintained the tie until the end of the fourth quarter, causing the game to go into overtime.

Yucaipa High School sophomore Tristan Doty looks to pass to senior J.D. Shah during the fourth quarter of the game in the Wildcat gym on Feb. 4. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Over-time

Thunderbird Nathen Hernandez and Wildcat Ashir Shaw returned to the half court line for the jump ball to begin overtime. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

With extra minutes on the clock for overtime, players, coaches and audience members prepared for the final deciding four minutes of the game.

At two minutes and three seconds, Yucaipa led with 68 points with REV behind by a mere point.

At two minutes REV got the lead with 69 points with Yucaipa still at 68 points. The game continued it’s back and forth pattern by Yucaipa leading with 70 points with REV at 69 points at one minute and 44 seconds left in overtime, but by Yucaipa having 9 fouls and REV with eight. Both teams had the chance of going into the double bonus and for more free throws.

Redlands East Valley High School sophomore Darrell Green guards Yucaipa High School senior J.D. Shah during the fourth quarter of the game against YHS on Feb. 4 in the Wildcat gym. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

With one minute and 17 seconds of the game left on the clock, REV had the lead of 71 points, Yucaipa 70 points, and both teams with the same amount of fouls. 

The Wildcats got the possession at 47.6 seconds left in overtime, gaining more points.

At 18.9 seconds, the Thunderbirds had the possession, but time had run out and the Wildcats’ defense held Yucaipa from scoring.

The Wildcats ended the game victoriously by one point with an end score of 71-70.

Although Yucaipa High School drew a foul from Redlands East Valley High School with 1:02 left on the click, they missed both of their free throws. The Thunderbirds’ Tristan Doty was at the free throw line. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Redlands East Valley High School senior Piave Fitzpatrick and junior Jeremiah Bolaños jump with enthusiasm after winning their final CBL game of the 2021-22 basketball season in an overtime clincher. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Wildcats’ boys varsity basketball team triumphs over Terriers 62-50

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

The Redlands East Valley High School Wildcats were looking for a rematch with their cross-town rival Redlands High School Terriers on Jan. 31, three days after the Terriers had beat the Wildcats in intense game of back-and-forth with a score of 51-48 on Jan. 28.

Although REV had lost against RHS by three points, the Wildcats’ boys’ basketball team had momentum after winning first in the San Bernardino Kiwanis Tournament last Saturday, Jan. 29, 2022. 

On Monday, Jan. 31, 2022, the Wildcats faced the Terriers in the RHS main gym. 

Both students and teachers attended the game from REV and RHS; the Wildcats’ previous athletic director Rhonda Fouch had come to watch the game as well as the varsity girls’ basketball coach Robert Tompkins.

Whenever a steal, three-pointer, layup or good play was executed, students from both REV and RHS erupted in cheers or jeers. 

By the end of the third quarter, the game was at a tie of 39-39 with three fouls for RHS and six fouls for REV.

If either team hoped to win the game, they both had to leave their best on the court that night.

There was slight discourse throughout the game including the referees assigning fouls to the wrong players and a player from REV and RHS slightly arguing, but despite this, the game continued.

Energetic cheers were thrown across the gym from both REV and RHS’ sides and the echoing acoustics of the gym amplified their loud cheers.

The eventful game ended with a score of 62-50 giving the Wildcats’ their sixteenth win for their boys’ varsity basketball team.

RHS had beaten REV by three points last game, but REV made sure to leave their mark by defeating RHS by 12 points.

Tonight, Feb. 4,  the Wildcats will have their final game and senior night at the REV gym against Yucaipa High School at REV at 7 p.m.. Not only is it a final game for their seniors, but also for their head coach Bill Berich.

Redlands High School sophomore Connor Clem practices free throw shots during warmups on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

During warmup, the Wildcats’ varsity boys’ basketball team huddle and talk before they continue back into their practice shooting. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: For the Wildcats, it came down to defense to start their adrenaline to run, and for the Terriers, it came down to their quick passes and offense to excel during the game. The student section for REV, in the far left of the picture, supported the Wildcats’ team through their cheers. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw attempts to block a three pointer from Redlands High School senior Elijah Hester. RHS managed to get multiple three pointers around the three point line which helped them to get a lead during the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Arnie Corpus guards Redlands High School senior Mateo Toledo on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. The defense from the Wildcats helped to stop the Terriers’ movement of the ball and possibility to score further. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School junior Jeremiah Bolaños shoots from the three point line during the second quarter in the Terrier gym on Jan. 31. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Spirited and joyous yelling could be heard, especially from the RHS students. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands High School senior guard Cooper Bell, defended by Redlands East Valley High School junior Ashir Shaw, helps to move the ball around for the Terriers on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands High School senior point guard Elijah Hester, defended by Wildcat junior Jeremiah Bolaños, manages to drive, pass and open up the court for a chance to either deliver a jump shot or drive in the Terrier gym on Jan. 31. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Jadyn Hardy brings up the ball while being guarded by Redlands High School senior Elijah Hester on Jan. 31 in the Terrier gym. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

The Wildcat Litterbox supported their team despite the team being down in points during some parts of the game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

Above: The game ended with the Wildcats winning 62 to 50 and both teams in the double bonus. RHS and REV lined up, clapped each other’s hands, and left the gym to chat with friends and family about the eventful game. (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photo)

California football teams fight for championship game win

By ISAAC MEJIA

The San Francisco 49ers and Los Angeles Rams faced off in the second NFC championship game of the season at Sofi Stadium in Inglewood, California.  

The California teams competed aggressively for a chance to play at the 2022 Super Bowl, and the Los Angeles Rams ultimately claimed victory in the fourth quarter by interception. 

Both teams’ had a strong desire to win the game, and their desire was fueled by the possibility of redemption from their recent Super Bowl losses. The San Francisco 49ers last appeared at the 2020 Super Bowl against the Kansas City Chiefs and they lost 31-20. The Los Angeles Rams competed one year earlier at the 2019 Super Bowl and lost 13-3 to the New England Patriots.

While the 49ers have continued their pursuit to the Super Bowl with Jimmy Garropolo as their starting quarterback, the LA Rams have tackled the challenge with Matthew Stafford, the Detroit Lions former starting quarterback who was traded for Jared Goff in 2021.  

The second NFC championship game guarantees one California football team will participate in the 2022 Super Bowl at Sofi Stadium. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News art)

Overview of the game

First quarter 0-0

  • 15:00 The Rams have possession of the ball.
  • 7:00 Mathew Stafford throws an interception into the endzone.
  • Penalty called on the 49ers cornerback Ambry Thomas for holding outside receiver.
  • Jake Gervase, LA Rams safety, walks off field because of a suspected injury. 

2nd quarter 10-7 San Francisco

  • 15:00 The Rams have possession of the ball.
  • Matthew Stafford threw a controversial incomplete pass that almost resulted in a fumble and touchdown for San Francisco.
  • 8:46 Stafford threw a 16 yard touchdown pass to Cooper Kupp, LA Rams wide receiver. The Rams take the lead 0-7. 
  • 6:10 Deebo Samuel, San Francisco wide receiver, receives the ball at the 44-yard line and sprints to the endzone. The game is tied 7-7. 
  • 1:51 LA Rams kicker, Matt Gay attempts 54-yard field goal but misses. The game remained tied 7-7. 
  • 1:00 Deebo Samuel is tackled by LA Rams safety Nick Scott. Samuel remains on the ground which calls for concern. San Francisco calls a timeout, but Deebo Samuel is okay. 
  • 0:02 The 49ers kicker Robbie Gould successfully makes a 37-yard field goal. San Francisco takes the lead 10-7.

Third quarter 17-7 San Francisco

  • 15:00 San Francisco has possession and a defensive penalty is quickly called on the LA Rams.
  • 7:00 LA Rams challenge a short of the line ruling, but the ruling stands and San Francisco gains possession.
  • 1:59 Garrapalo throws a 16-yard touchdown pass to tight end Goerge Kittle. San Francisco takes the lead 17-7. 
  • 15-yard penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct on San Francisco defense for taunting.

Fourth quarter 17-21 LA Rams

  • 13:30 Stafford throws an 11-yard touchdown pass to Cooper Kupp. The Rams shorten San Francisco lead 17-14.
  • 15-yard penalty on San Francisco saftey, James Ward, for unnecessary roughness
  • 6:49 Matt Gay makes a 40-yard field goal and ties the game 17-17.
  • 1:46 Matt Gay makes a 30-yard field goal. The Rams take the lead 17-20.  
  • 1:11 Garoppolo throws an interception and Rams win the game. 

The Los Angeles Rams will compete against the Cincinnati Bengals next Sunday at 3:30 p.m for the 2022 Super Bowl. The Bengals scored a game winning field goal in overtime against the Kansas City Chiefs during their championship game. This will be the Bengals first time playing at the Super Bowl since 1988.

Wildcats’ first Spring Sports Fair encourages athletic participation

By ETHIC NEWS STAFF

The Redlands East Valley Associated Student Body hosted their first Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28 during lunch in order to recruit more players and fans to support the spring sports season.

This is the first year that a sports fair was organized as well as the first year for the new Athletic Director Chad Blatchley. Blatchley is now in charge of the day-to-day workings of all the sports programs at REV. With the help of the ASB and the sports representatives, he was able to organize the Spring Sports Fair.

Blatchley said, “We wanted to get more fans coming to games and build support. We plan to have a fall sports day.”

In order for students to participate in any sport, students must have a current physical, fill out a clearance form on the REV website, turn it into the office to the athletics secretary Gabi Heinel and wait for an email that confirms that they have been cleared to participate.

Softball

Softball is looking for new players for their junior varsity and freshman teams. Some tryouts have already occurred and more tryouts are coming soon.

Sophomore Ivy Walker is looking forward to having a full season since last year’s season was short due to the lack of pre-season games. 

Peyton Angelini, a senior at REV, said, “Just come out and have fun and try something new.”

Boys golf

Boys golf will be under new leadership this year with coach Jake Ducey. Ducey, a current physical education teacher at REV, played golf at REV and the University of Redlands. 

Senior Bailey Jung joined the golf team his sophomore year and feels that he has improved greatly since then. 

“It helps you learn to keep your cool, helps you learn proper etiquette, and be a better person,” said Jung. 

Due to not having a golf course on campus, the team practices at the Redlands Country Club and Oak Valley Golf Club in Beaumont. 

The team will compete in a Beaumont golf tournament at the Morongo Golf Club at Tukwet Canyon on March 14.

Redlands East Valley High School seniors Bailey Jung, Patrick McIntyre, Alex Miller and Kadin Khalloufi advertise the boys golf team during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Track and field

Track and field is unique in that it has various events to partake in: sprints, jumps, hurdles, long-distance and throws. Despite not having an all-weather track, REV’s track and field team competes in Division 2 in CIF. The team’s head coaches are Camille Andreas and Matt Sartori. 

Redlands East Valley High School junior Craig Morrison speaks to Track and Field players, seniors Felix Espericueta and Keyvon Rankin, about the incoming season during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Senior Felix Espericueta, a sprinter on the team, said, “It’s interesting to meet new people and see what their passions are about sports.”

Track and field’s first meet will take place against San Bernardino High School at San Bernardino on Feb. 22 at 3 p.m.

Badminton

The badminton team, the only co-ed sport on campus, including the fall season, encourages students to represent the Wildcats on the court.

Badminton players Quinn Larson, Ashley Hernandez Osorio, Angelita Cornejo Talavera, Prescott Neiswender and Arnie James Corpus collect sign-ups at their table during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (CYRUS ENGELSMAN/Ethic News photo)

Ted Ducey, the head coach of the badminton team, says, “My favorite element of badminton is the fast pace and approachability—there are so many strategies, that just about everyone regardless of physical ability can find some key role to play on the court.” 

Ducey, also mentioned some of the more unique aspects of badminton, saying, “A few things that make badminton unique include that it is the only sport on campus that has one team for both boys and girls. Another interesting thing about badminton is that it is very approachable for newcomers.”

Join badminton if interested in an opportunity for exercise and making lasting, strong bonds with fellow teammates.

Boys tennis

The tennis team is looking forward to new players, especially with the season starting in a few weeks. Because of COVID-19 lockdown, the boys’ team was prevented from having a full and proper season. They are confident that will have a complete season this year.

“Honestly, I don’t think it will affect us much because the last two seasons were very rough due to COVID-19. And as difficult as it was, we still continued to play through it,” says Logan Wells, REV senior and boys varsity tennis captain. 

“I’m looking forward to the whole season, but specifically our match against RHS because it is our biggest match of the season,” continues Wells. 

Tennis players Abigail Washburn, Maryn Strong, Denver Neff, Colin Hawkins, Dorothy Clerk, Logan Wells and Hayden Rentz encourage students to join their sport during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Baseball

Going into the spring season, the REV baseball team is looking for new players. Daren Espinoza is the coach for the REV Baseball team. If interested in joining the team, there are available positions.

Senior Emmanuel Palos, who plays pitcher and field, says, “It’s cool, I’ve never done it before.”

Sophomore Donovan Gonzalez, who plays first base and pitcher, says he is excited about the spring season. 

Redlands East Valley High School students Devynn Heller, Cameron Leaney, Korbin Fickett, Dayton Thompson, George Cordero, Laviel Pickett, Emmanuel Palos, Aidan Hermosillo, AJ Daniel and Donavan Gonzalez represent baseball with their sweatshirts at their table. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo)

Boys volleyball

The REV boys volleyball team is asking to have Wildcats’ support. If interested in joining the team, positions are available. Supporting fellow Wildcats from the bleachers is appreciated, as well. 

Senior varsity player Aiden Hernandez said, “I’m excited that other students that might not know about certain sports get an opportunity to find other sports they might be interested in.” 

Hernandez adds that he believes that this fair is “to get more athletic involvement in the spring sports because fall sports are more popular, like football. Spring sports are not as popular with the student body.” 

The boys volleyball team is currently having sign-ups and will be holding their first open gym clinic on Feb. 1 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wildcat Gym. 

Boys volleyball will have their first away game on Feb. 25 against Martin Luther King High School with junior varsity at 3:15 p.m. and varsity at 4:30 p.m.

Redlands East Valley High School seniors Aiden Hernandez and Noah Snodgrass represent boys’ volleyball in hopes of gaining more support and new players for their upcoming season during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/Ethic News photo) 

Swim

The swim team adds new coach and REV teacher Austin Brown to their coaching staff this year. Many new swimmers have signed up, but the team is still looking for new players. Interested students are encouraged to contact coaches. 

 Joined by coaches Julianne Ford and Austin Brown, swimmers Bryce Coen, Nathan Derry, Max Cannon, Gregory Coffield, Ethan Geureca, Emma Guerrero, Anastasia Tardie, Isabella Martinez Spencer and Nico Perna help gather new recruits during the Spring Sports Fair on Jan. 28. (MAURICIO PLIEGO/ Ethic News photo)

Ethan Guereca, a junior at REV, said, “As I saw more and more people sign up, it got me excited for the season. With the help of Mr. Brown, Mrs. Ford and all the other coaches that come out to help, I believe that myself and several others would improve as swimmers.”

Reminiscing of his first season, Guereca said, “As of competition-wise I think it would be better than we did last year. Last year was my first year being on a swim team and participating in swim meets and I was nervous and several others were the same as me. Now that I’m more experienced with how everything works I would be less nervous I was last year and I believe others on the swim team think the same way.”

Juliann Ford, assistant swim coach, said “We have the best workouts and we’re just the best.”

Editor’s note: Walker’s name was mistakenly published as Ivy Wilder in the original post. It has since been corrected on Jan. 28 at 11:09 p.m.

Citrus Valley girls’ soccer tryouts commence

By  JASMINE ROSALES

Back for another season, coaches and student athletes prepare for the 2021-22 soccer season at Citrus Valley High School. Tryouts for the girls’ soccer program were held from Monday, Oct. 18 to Thursday, Oct. 21 from 6 a.m. to 7:30 a.m..

As players and coaches alike returned for a new season, mask restrictions have been lifted and students have the opportunity to practice comfortably mask free.

Junior varsity girls’ soccer coach Cassondra Delgado and varsity girls’ soccer coach Norma Mendez observe girls scrimmaging a small game  (Photo from Allen Thoe)

Coach Kim Zollinger, the freshman coach, says, “The hype of a new soccer season is underway for the girls soccer program at Citrus Valley. As coaches, we are looking forward to another great season. The tryouts for the 2021-2022 season has blown us away with the amount of student-athletes participating and the competition is definitely present. As the freshmen coach, I look forward to having a season for the freshmen team to compete in and experience high school level soccer. I feel blessed to be a part of an incredible program of athletes and coaches.” 

During the four days of tryouts, the days were organized to give the athletes an opportunity to showcase their talent to the coaches.

 Coach Cassondra Delgado, the junior varsity coach states, “I am very excited to be back for another year of coaching. I enjoy working with the coaches and interacting with the girls in the soccer program. Something I am really excited about is the new talent coming in this year. We have a lot of great players, so I can’t wait to compete and play a high level of quality soccer.” 

On day one, coaches set up five different stations for the girls to cycle through each of them and have the opportunity to show their skills. In the five stations, there was a 35-yard kick, a small shuttle run, shots on goal, dribbling and a 40-yard sprint.

 On day two, girls were encouraged to run a mile and a half under 12 minutes for varsity due to the high amount of running the sport requires for conditioning. After the run, coaches separated the girls by their last names and finished up stats from the previous day. 

On day three of tryouts, girls were split into three to four players and played small one-on-one games and so on amongst each other.

 Nearing the end of tryouts, day four was the big day where the girls really got to show their abilities and played multiple half-field scrimmages.

Coach Norma Mendez instructs girls on what day 1 of tryouts will consist of and how they will be scoring their stats. (Photo by Allen Thoe)

After tryouts came to an end, coaches and teams began practices preparing for the preseason to kickstart the 2021-22 season. Underway for the league season as the new year rings in, teams of all three levels begin their preseason games against local high schools. Schools throughout the Inland Empire have all set up friendly scrimmages amongst one another to prepare their teams for league games. 

In the month of December, preseason gives teams the opportunity to begin playing as a team.

The Marching Wildcats end season at finals


By JOHNATHAN GHAZAL

Redlands East Valley High School marching band advanced to Division 3A finals on Nov. 20. Their success in previous competitions allowed them to reach the finals.

Prior to the Great Orange Classic, REV received first place at the Citrus Valley Classic on Oct. 2 at Citrus Valley High School and fourth place at the Mustang Classic on Oct. 16 at West Valley High School while Citrus Valley had received third place and fifth place. 

On Oct. 21, the Wildcats used the Blackhawks’ Hodges stadium to finish learning their sets and positions for their performance, “The Artist.” 

Marching band is a large time commitment that involves practice sessions, the loading and unloading of the trailer, and setting up the props. It takes a whole team of students and parents to simply get all the equipment to each practice away from REV, as they do not currently have a football field.

The Marching Wildcats perform their show “The Artist” on Oct. 22 at Ramona High School. They are performing one of their squatting visuals. (Courtesy of Richelle Ghazal)

Wildcat High Winds Captain, Carlos Cruz, said that the key to success for the band as a team and in competition is the strong bond that they have formed after having spent many hours together.

“We [have] spent over 200 hours together since school started,” said Cruz. 

In addition, the majority of the REV band members attended band camp over the summer before the school year began.

Since the Citrus Valley Classic, the Wildcats have admitted that their enthusiasm and focus have waned. Practices have not been as productive as others have been. However, through the determination of the band members, they have been able to improve their score each time throughout the following competitions.

At Ramona High School in Riverside, they performed the entire show and used their newly painted black props for the first time in competition on Oct. 22. 

After the performance, Sarah Bocanegra, a sophomore REV tenor saxophone player, said, “[I’m] tired. [It was] well worth it, and [I feel] relieved.” 

After the other bands performed that afternoon, the awards were distributed with the scores read out by the announcer. Citrus Valley placed seventh with a score of 74 points and REV placed third with a score of 76.30 points. 

Daisy Felipe, a sophomore REV alto saxophone player, said, “I feel we did our best, and we all deserve what we got. We will keep pushing further.”

The next competition for the Marching Wildcats occured at San Gorgonio High School. They scored 79 points earning third place, followed by the semi-finals in Mission Viejo where they scored 80.79 points in 12th place, qualifying them to compete at the finals amongst 14 other bands. 

Having advanced into the finals on Nov. 20, they placed 11th with a score of 81 points at Newport Harbor High School in Newport Beach.

Marching Wildcats perform at Newport Harbor High School for the California State Band Championships finals on Nov. 20. They are seen without their colorful smocks, as they transition into the “Painted Black” portion of the show. (Courtesy of Richelle Ghazal)

NFL Coach Jon Gruden’s emails get exposed

By KENDRA BURDICK

Through emails sent, the Raiders head coach, Jon Gruden, was pushed out of his position due to his explicitness, usage of homophobic slurs and denunciation of the emergence of women as referees. 

Networks such as ESPN and NFL express disapproval for his use of profanity in his emails to players. The Raiders’ lead coach was pushed out of his position because of an email sent to the wrong people.

Gruden’s emails were sent to a wide range of people such as current NFL coaches, players, and various media entities; many of which questioned Gruden’s use of these terms and expressed distaste towards his comments. Photo by Official Travis AFB, Calif. is licensed with CC BY-NC 2.0.

The issue started when Gruden sent an email with explicit content to a former player, Derek Carr. This cost him his job because he was not allowed to send emails like this to other players.

The email also was sent to a group of high-ranking executives at NFL league offices, such as the former President of the Washington Football Team Bruce Allen and the American football coach and defensive coordinator for the Washington Football Team Jack Del Rio.

This email used the homophobic slur which is considered offensive and unacceptable to LGBTQ individuals.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell responded to the emails, “Next time you call me, stop with the homophobic slurs and get to what’s need to be said; you can use any other offensive language that you want.”

The emails say, “I don’t like women officials, I don’t like female coaches, I don’t like kids [. . .] women should not ref. We all know this is true.”

The main story about the email incident also stated that several NFL coaches and players were pressuring the Raiders’ coach, but he declined to comment, according to The Guardian. Gruden was officially let go after half a season. He is expected to become the head coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Concerning the media, the NFL was not interested in this story because of “confidentiality” issues. The NFL has an anti-discrimination policy and relies on each team and each staff to follow it.

The Raiders were not interested in this story because they were not mentioned in the emails and said that Gruden was a veteran coach, and he had been working for the team for years.

The NFL Players Association was not interested in the story because they were not included or mentioned in the emails. CBS, ESPN, Fox and NBC were not interested in the story because of “confidentiality” issues.

What are others’ thoughts about the Raiders Coach getting fired due to inscripting emails found?

Many fans of the Raiders and others were appalled by this type of behavior by someone who is supposed to be a leader in his field. While some people believe that it is a way to get rid of people who are not talented enough for the job, others think that this is a way of punishing someone for their offensive comments.

Redlands East Valley takes home the smudge pot

 By CRAIG MORRISON

The Smudge Pot game took place on Oct. 15 between the Redlands East Valley Wildcats and the Redlands High School Terriers.

The Smudge Pot game was a thrill to watch. Fierce competition was present in the field and stands as the game ran into two overtimes. 

In the first quarter of the game, both teams showed great defense. The ball hardly moved from the Terrier’s end zone as both defenses were making great stops. 

The first touchdown graced the audience in the second quarter with a passing play that resulted in a 7-0 lead for the Wildcats. After this touchdown, Redlands High School made a fantastic kickoff return that would have tied the game; if the flags were not against them. Shortly after, the Terriers threw long for a touchdown to make the score 7-7. This tie would stay for the remainder of the first half of the game.

Redlands East Valley, in the red uniforms, attempting a field goal kick against Redlands High School, in the blue and white uniforms. This field goal kick by the Wildcats to win the game in overtime was just shy of the uprights. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News photo)

Seven minutes into the third quarter, the Terriers threw another touchdown to make the score 14-7. Tension and excitement was audible in the stands as chants and cheers increased. Two fumbles by the Wildcats and Terriers were seen before the end of the third quarter resulting in the Wildcats having possession going into the fourth.

After another passing play by the Wildcats, the score was once again tied at 14-14 with 9 minutes left of the fourth quarter. The defense increased dramatically on both sides as the clock winded down. 

The last two minutes of the game seemed to crawl by. The Wildcats were holding the Terriers to their end zone and created many attempts to get a touchdown. With just a few seconds remaining before the last quarter ended, the Wildcats attempted a field goal kick to win the game. As the game clock expired, the ball was sent flying into the air, heading just right of the uprights. This sent the game into overtime.

The Terriers started with the ball in overtime. They began a drive that led to an almost game winning touchdown pass. But, it was blocked by the Wildcat defensive player Nate Wells. The Terriers decided to finish their overtime possession with a field goal kick that was just shy of making it in, giving the ball to the Wildcats.

The Wildcats used many quarterback runs to gain yards in their drive. A few long shots were seen but were unsuccessful. The Wildcats resorted to a field goal kick that went to the Terriers sideline and stayed in bounds. This was recovered by the Terriers and almost led to a win for the Terriers, if not for the Wildcat kicker Yaqiym Halliburton. 

The second overtime of the game started with the Terriers’ drive but with no touchdown or field goal, giving possession to the Wildcats. The Wildcats moved the chains with more quarterback runs which ultimately showed little success. An unfair matchup was spotted on the field by Wildcats coaches with Wildcat receiver Laviel Pickett and Terrier cornerback number 15. The sizable height difference gave huge advantages to the Wildcat receiver. 

The Wildcats decided to use this matchup and threw up the ball to Pickett in the endzone. Pickett caught the ball and landed in the endzone, securing the Wildcats as the winners of the Smudge Pot game.

Redlands East Valley Wildcats holding up the Smudge Pot trophy. This win was no easy feat for the team, so the excitement was apparent. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News photo)

Both teams showed great effort. The suspense and tensions of the game made for an enjoyable experience that will leave many fans waiting in anticipation for next year.

Photos: Wildcat varsity boys water polo team crushes Beaumont

By MIA ARANDA 

Redlands East Valley High School varsity boys water polo team defeated Beaumont High School with a score of 22-3 at REV’s pool on Oct. 18. Their win has allowed them to maintain their rank as first place in the Citrus Belt League.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Nick Sadowski (right) attempts to block passes from Beaumont High School’s Sean Dickinson (left) during the first quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Sadowski scored one goal overall in the first quarter. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photos)

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Gavin Oliver dribbles the ball toward Beaumont High School’s half during the first quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Oliver had a total of five points scored throughout the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Beaumont High School goalie Noah Lopez attempts to defend a shot from Redlands East Valley High School junior Ruben Villanueva during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Lopez surrendered 22 goals throughout the game.  (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

REV secured the lead quickly as they were winning 8-0 by the end of the first quarter. REV seniors Gavin Oliver and Riley Bour tied for most goals in this quarter with three goals scored each.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Riley Bour receives an assist prompting him to successfully score against Beaumont High School during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Bour had a total of five goals scored during the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

Above: Beaumont High School’s William Peters prepares to pass the ball while being guarded by Redlands East Valley High School senior Ralph Veach during the second quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Peters would go on to later score Beaumont’s third goal in the fourth quarter. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

By the end of the second quarter, REV maintained their spacious lead by continuing to not surrender any goals to BHS. They also scored nine goals in this quarter equating to a score of 17-0.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Nico Perna guards Beaumont High School’s Peter Williams during the third quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. Perna had a total of three goals scored throughout the game. (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

During the third quarter, Santino Nicassio-Ortiz scored the first goal for BHS while REV continued to gain five more goals.

Above: Redlands East Valley High School senior Luca Smith guards the goal during the fourth quarter of REV vs. BHS on Oct. 18 at REV. REV varsity water polo captain Gavin Oliver said, “Luca Smith [was] great in the goal. Not too many shots on the goal, but everytime there [was] one, it’s mostly blocked.” (MIA ARANDA/ Ethic News photo)

With a final score of 22-3, Brady Hall and William Peters were able to score two additional goals for BHS during the fourth quarter. 

REV seniors and varsity captains Nico Perna and Gavin Oliver attribute their team’s strengths to being cohesive and adaptable. Perna and Oliver have both been playing water polo for about six years, thus have gained much experience. 

Oliver said, “If someone says to another person ‘hey, do this,’ they’ll do it right away. We listen to each other. We respect each other.” 

“Our current game plans are working pretty well and we can adapt quickly,” said Perna. 

Despite the win, Perna and Oliver express personal improvements they could have made during the game. 

Oliver said, “I feel like in this game, I could have made better passes. I made a few that were too high, too low, but if they were more accurate, we could have had two more goals maybe.” 

Perna feels he could have improved on his shooting.

The REV junior varsity boys water polo team also beat BHS following the varsity game on Oct. 25. The final score for junior varsity was 22-2. 

The REV junior varsity team captains are sophomores Zachary Cash and Lucas Torres.

Torres, who has been playing water polo for two years, said, “The JV team worked great together and excelled in defense. It’s amazing seeing how all our practices helped bond the team to where we can trust each other’s decisions versus how we first started.”

With the season wrapping up, Torres said, “I just hope all my boys had some fun and consider joining the club team [Renegades Waterpolo] or maybe continue next year if they’re up for it.”

REV varsity boys water polo will play in the CIF playoffs  on Nov. 13.

Blackhawks take victory over Wildcats football

By DESTINY RAMOS and CRAIG MORRISON

Photos by DESTINY RAMOS, MARSHALL SCOTT and CRAIG MORRISON

The Redlands East Valley varsity football team faced off against Citrus Valley High School in Dodge Stadium on Friday, Oct. 8. A well-played game by the Wildcats, but the Blackhawks took the win with a final score of 7-57.

REV Analysis:

Redlands East Valley put up an admirable performance at the game. With the score aside, they showcased many great traits of the team. 

However, a few crucial flaws gave way to the landslide victory. These hiccups revolved around inconsistency.

Inconsistency with tackling was a huge part of the problem. Many times Wildcat defensive players were in the correct position but were unable to bring the opponent down. These occurrences resulted in Blackhawks gaining points and eventually touchdowns.

 Citrus Valley High School, wearing the white and black uniforms, kicked off to Redlands East Valley High School, wearing the red and black uniforms, on Oct. 8 during the third quarter of the game. This sight was a common occurrence due to Citrus Valley’s high score. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News photo)

Another area of improvement is speed. The Wildcats’ safeties and cornerbacks were simply not fast enough for the Blackhawks’ wide receivers. The Blackhawks’ receivers would gain a lead between their defenders and easily catch a throw for massive gains of yards.

On the positive side, the Wildcats displayed many noteworthy attributes during the game.

The Wildcats’ quarterback had great, fast and accurate throws. He was throwing the ball quickly after receiving it which really helped the Wildcats pick up some yards. 

The Wildcats’ offense also improved play variety. More passing plays were seen in this game compared to the previous one and even a fake punt was attempted.

In addition, the Wildcats’ defensive line was working hard this game. Kaden Khalloufi, linebacker for the Wildcats, was able to sack the quarterback in the middle of the third quarter.

All in all, the Wildcats have some areas that need improving but put up a great and entertaining game on Friday.

Citrus Valley Analysis:

Citrus Valley made their ultimate comeback on Friday, Oct. 8 as the varsity football team faced off Redlands East Valley. The Blackhawks put much hard work into this game, which clearly paid off with the win and score of 7-57. The varsity team had lost their previous two games to Centennial and Cajon high schools, with the winning teams leading by ten or more points.

One of Citrus Valley plays during the third quarter that resulted in another touchdown for the Blackhawks. (DESTINY RAMOS/ Ethic News photo)

The Blackhawks were off to a great start. Eight minutes into the game, player number four made the first touchdown of the night, which was the beginning of the Blackhawks’ touchdown streak. 

The Citrus Valley Spirit Crew attended the game and led students with chants such as “you have no field” and “we can’t hear you.” Although the chants were well unexpected, the Blackhawks did not disappoint their team. 

The first quarter ended with Blackhawks leading 0-14. 

The second quarter was consistent with two touchdowns and one field goal. Wildcat player number 23 had gotten REV’s first touchdown, but that would have been the only time the Blackhawks would allow the Wildcats to score that night. At second-and-27 in the game, player number 4 made a 20-yard touchdown pass. The score was 7-27, Blackhawks leading by halftime. 

The third and fourth quarters had the Blackhawks leading by more and more points. Great plays were made that eventually resulted in the high score and victory against REV. The Wildcats may not have gotten the best score, but they did fight hard and gave an entertaining game.

Spiritleaders Ashley Pham, Jenna Negrete and Malani Tauli cheer for their team after the final Blackhawk touchdown in the fourth quarter. (DESTINY RAMOS/Ethic News photo)

Justin Tucker set a new record for the NFL

By CRAIG MORRISON

The NFL record for the longest field goal kick made was set on Sunday, Sept. 26. Justin Tucker, NFL placekicker for the Baltimore Ravens, set the record during the Baltimore Ravens and Detroit Lions football game. Tucker set it by hitting a 66 yard field goal to set the Ravens over the Lions in points and win the game.

Tucker took the field in the final seconds of the game with the Ravens trailing by one. As his foot made contact with the ball, the game clock expired. The ball sailed across the field, coming down directly on the crossbar and bouncing in through the uprights for the three points the Ravens needed to win.

This made Tucker 16 for 16 in the last minute of regulation field goal attempts. This record setting hit goes alongside his record for being the most accurate kicker in NFL history.

The record for longest field goal kick made in the NFL was previously set with a 64 yard field goal by Denver Broncos placekicker Matt Prater in December 2013. This record was undisputed for eight years but was finally beaten by Tucker’s amazing kick.

Before the game, Tucker practiced hitting 65 yard field goals but was coming up short each time both ways.

“Thankfully, we found an extra yard-and-a-half that I didn’t have three hours before,” said Tucker as reported by ESPN.

This new record will secure Justin Tucker’s legacy and his path towards the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

File:Justin Tucker 2020.jpg

Photo by All-Pro Reels, CC BY-SA 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Photos: Dragons end softball season with 3 home runs against Birch

By DEBBIE DIAZ and JOSEPH PACHECO

Orangewood High School participated in their last softball game of the season on Oct. 13 against Birch High School, hitting three home runs and concluding their season with a win.

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez runs to first base versus Birch High School on Oct. 13. The OHS Dragons are coached by Mark Perkins. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic Photo)

Orangewood High School junior Jesse Navarro pitches to Birch High School on the Oct. 13 softball game. Navarro is the Dragons’ main softball pitcher. (DEBBIE DIAZ/Ethic photo)

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez prepares to bat versus Birch High School on Oct. 13. As as senior in the last game of the season, Gomez played her last softball game. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic photo)

Orangewood High School junior Alicia Zaragoza waits for the coach to announce safe or out on the Oct. 13 softball game versus Birch. “Zaragoza is our best first baseman,” says OHS senior Jocelyn Gomez. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News)

Orangewood High School senior Jocelyn Gomez rounds first base in the Oct. 13 game versus Birch High School. As a senior in the last game of the season, this is the last softball game Gomez plays for the Dragons. (DEBBIE DIAZ/ Ethic News)

Smudge Pot football game fuels burning school rivalry

By AILEEN JANEE CORPUS

Wildcats celebrating their 5th consecutive Smudgepot victory in 2017. (ANDREW VINES/ Ethic News photo) https://ethic-news.org/2017/10/17/wildcats-win-smudge-pot-for-fifth-year-in-a-row-against-terriers/

It’s October and that means two things for Redlands East Valley High School and Redlands High School students: Halloween and the annual Smudge Pot football game. The Smudge Pot game is the rivalry between the REV Wildcats and the RHS Terriers.

To start off, what even is a smudge pot? A smudge pot is a device that burns oil and is placed in orchards in order to keep the trees from frosting their leaves and their fruit.

Although the use of these orchard heaters has been illegal in California since 1947, that does not stop the symbolism of the smudge pot from prevailing in Redlands, California, once home to more than 15,000 acres of orange groves.

On the smudge pot, a statement is engraved: “A perpetual trophy, honoring redlands’ citrus industry heritage, passed to the winner of the annual Redlands High School vs. Redlands East Valley High School football game, in the spirit of friendly competition and sportsmanship.” (AILEEN JANEE CORPUS/ Ethic News photos)

The beginning of this rivalry amongst two schools started in 1997, the first year that REV was open, and continues to this day every school year in October.

Per tradition, whichever school wins the football game also wins the smudge pot with the score of the game engraved on the smudge pot. In the past 23 years, Redlands East Valley High School has taken the smudge pot 14 times, and Redlands High School has taken it 10 times.

The Smudge Pot game is also a great opportunity for the REV Litterbox and the RHS Boneyard to show their school pride and high spirits. In past years, students have painted their bodies according to their school colors and have cheer-offs against the opposing school.

For this 2021-2022 school year, the Smudge Pot game will occur Friday, Oct. 15 with gates opening at 5:30 p.m. and kickoff at 7:00 p.m. at the RHS football stadium, Dodge Stadium.

Tickets to the game can be purchased at any time on the website gofan.com, and game-day tickets will be available for purchase. Tickets for adults are $8 and tickets for students are $5. Children 6 and under and students with an ASB card will be admitted to the game for free. 

Good luck to both teams, and may the best team win.

Wildcats lose homecoming game against Beaumont

By CRAIG MORRISON

The Redlands East Valley High School varsity football team faced Beaumont High School at Citrus Valley High School on Oct. 1. With both teams known for their offenses, this game was going to be the one to see. 

Beaumont scored their first touchdown and two-point conversion within the first eight minutes of the first quarter. Shortly after, Beaumont High School recovered their onside kick and brought the football down the field for another eight points.

Redlands East Valley, wearing the black and red uniforms, at Citrus Valley High School kicking off the football to Beaumont, wearing the white and blue uniforms, to start the first quarter of the game. This marks the beginning of the REV homecoming game on Oct. 1, 2021. (CRAIG MORRISON/ Ethic News)

This trend continued for the rest of the first and second half resulting in a devastating 61-21 loss for REV. Beaumont’s size and skill difference proved too much for REV to handle.

Even though the score difference was great, there were still many great highlights for the REV team. Outstanding runs, catches, and even a hurdle were seen by REV and made many in the crowd go wild. 

At halftime, the Redlands East Valley ASB announced the homecoming court and the king and queen for Homecoming for the 2021-2022 school year. This was topped off with a display of fireworks to celebrate the event.