REVIEW: “Squid Game” tops the charts worldwide

By Salvador Barrera

“Squid Game,” a television series on Netflix, has become a worldwide phenomenon in the blink of an eye. The show poses the question: how much are you willing to sacrifice for a chance at salvation? “Squid Game” boiled down to its core, demonstrating how much humanity is willing to sacrifice for hope.  

Salvador Barrera poses with a card that is seen frequently in the show. (Bella Espinosa/Ethic News photo)

The series starts with Gi-Hun in poverty and needs money to regain custody of his daughter after. As the show progresses, he meets a man who offers him a chance to participate in Squid Games where he gambles his life for money. He competes in children’s games and as he continues in the games, he becomes desensitized to the death of others. By the end of the series, a man is willing to persevere and not succumb to the death that longs for him. 

This series is a masterpiece in its own way. However, it leaves much more to be desired as many plot holes need to be addressed in the new season, such as what happens to Gi-Hun’s daughter and how do the organizers of Squid Games get gamemasters to host the games. 

Although many questions arise, “Squid Game” gives a thorough explanation for the current events in the story, such as the backstories of each of the main characters and the shock that the old man has a dark realization that everything is not as it seems.

Yet, the show identifies the different plot points well. The show depicts how every contestant has a life outside of the games and their different motives for wanting to win the prize. The cash prize is the incentive for the contestants since they are all currently in poverty. Despite the different plot points, the show finds a way to connect this to the main idea that all the contestants have to play. 

It successfully brings attention to the hardships that many have to endure and how they see no other way out of their pain and struggle besides the games. 

Although the contestants are faced with the reality that they can quit the games, they decline and put their life on the line for a glimpse of hope. 

Many critics of “Squid Game” say that it is too gory and insensitive to audiences. However, the show uses an adequate amount of horror to hook the audience in and keep them on the edge of their seats. It is not made for children, it was made for people seeking the truth of humanity with evil and people should expect this as they watch it.

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