News

Lion Air airplane Boeing 737 crashes

By EMILY BLOMQUIST

The flight Boeing 737 MAX 8 was discovered in the Java Sea on Oct. 29.  The plane was a newer version and had only flown 8 flights prior to the crash. The flight was only supposed to be about an hour long, but after 13 minutes into the flight it went off the radar. Many hours later, parts of the airplane were found. Divers found no survivors of the 189 that were on the Indonesian plane.

This is the logo of the Lion Air Airlines. Lion Airlines is a low-cost Asian airline and is the largest air carrier in Indonesia.

According to CNN, the night before the plane took off there was an issue with the aircraft, but technicians said they had repaired it. While looking in the sea, the divers found the flight data recorder, which helps engineers discover what went wrong and analyze how it happened. Along with the data recorder, divers also discovered that the landing gear was still intact and untouched.

The divers, however, are still looking for the cockpit recorder to hear what the pilot and copilot were saying during the incident.  During its last four flights, there were problems with the airspeed indicator; although it had been fixed, it kept malfunctioning. The pilots were unaware of the possible risk of failure in the AOA.

The angle of the plane is essential to the flight, and the AOA determines if the plane is in a stable condition or is likely to plummet. On previous flights, passengers claimed that they felt a slight drop in the first few minutes of flight. This was because of the malfunctioning AOA sensor.

Investigators are trying to understand what really made the plane descend into the sea; they looked into the documents that pilots and technicians sign, which state what the problem was and how it was fixed. Investigators started to interview workers, such as technicians, and the crews that were involved in previous flights with the troubled aircraft.

Categories: News

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